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Thread: Nano-sized computers

  1. #1 Nano-sized computers 
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    Nano-size computer hailed as breakthrough

    Scientists in California say they have built a functioning microscopic computer made of carbon "nanotubes" instead of silicon. The step could lead to faster, ever-smaller electronic devices.

    Stanford University researchers said they have overcome downsizing limits posed by silicon transistors in everyday computers by using tiny semiconductors from rolled-up arrays of carbon atoms called "nanotubes" in a basic computer.
    Carbon nanotubes are rolled-up, single-layer sheets of carbon atoms. Tens of thousands can fit into the width of a single human hair.
    The minute prototype using several thousand carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was able to perform basic counting and number-sorting functions, said engineering professor Subhasish Mitra.
    "People have been talking about a new era of carbon nanotube (CNT) electronics moving beyond silicon," Mitra said. "Here is the proof."
    Manufacture possible
    A Stanford University announcement - also covered by the journal Nature - quoted the director of a computer chip design consortium, Naresh Shanbhag, as saying that industrial-scale production of the CNT semiconductors was possible within years.
    Another Stanford project leader, Philip Wong, said carbon nanotubes used less power and were smaller than silicon circuits.

    He was referring to a postulate first raised in 1965 that manufacturers can double the density of silicon transistors roughly every two years, but only down to 5 nanometers. Silicon's limit is expected to be reached around 2020."CNT's could take us at least an order of magnitude in performance beyond where you can project silicon could take us."
    Furthermore, silicon transistors packed onto conventional chips generate more heat and waste power.
    Stanford University said its researchers had achieved an "unprecedented feat" with the nanotube technology, which has been around for 15 years, by also creating a "powerful algorithm" to handle imperfections in the carbon tunnels and map out a circuit. This was "guaranteed to work no matter whether or where CNTs might be askew," the university said.
    'Significant advance'
    German hybrid electronics expert, Frank Kreupl of the Munich's Technical University commented in the Nature edition that the Stanford nanotube computer represented a significant advance.
    He added, however, that the CNT transistors would have to become even smaller for the technique to be feasible and the processors quicker.


    Nano-size computer hailed as breakthrough | News | DW.DE | 27.09.2013


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  3. #2  
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    This is interesting. Do you think it's also possible to build a functioning microscopic camera/video camera/bug which records in good quality?


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    Quote Originally Posted by GadgetMan987 View Post
    This is interesting. Do you think it's also possible to build a functioning microscopic camera/video camera/bug which records in good quality?
    I think if you looked closely enough you could find one in a single ray of light.
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    Quote Originally Posted by serloco View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by GadgetMan987 View Post
    This is interesting. Do you think it's also possible to build a functioning microscopic camera/video camera/bug which records in good quality?
    I think if you looked closely enough you could find one in a single ray of light.
    What the hell are you talking about? Stop spreading woo on the forum.
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  6. #5  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by serloco View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by GadgetMan987 View Post
    This is interesting. Do you think it's also possible to build a functioning microscopic camera/video camera/bug which records in good quality?
    I think if you looked closely enough you could find one in a single ray of light.
    What the hell are you talking about? Stop spreading woo on the forum.
    Hi Harold nice to meet you. I wouldn't get upset about if I were you but see it for yourself. I have been studying light for a long time actually, and know much about it. I knew for about 8 years these things, and everything in the video here too, and more. Many here like to troll me, insult my advanced findings but that's OK, I understand being closed minded to new things, I used to be that way myself. Although i didn't insult them.

    I have told many people here that I study deeply the quantum science, light, for a great many years. But they seem to hate it as well as hate me for it, and just attack me for being me.

    I suggest keeping up to date in the sciences before attacking.




    CBC News: 'LED lights at airports can record video, alert staff to long lines and track behavior deemed suspicious'
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  7. #6  
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    A MEMS-compatible, simple fabrication technique for a nano-sized light source was developed, and its characteristics were investigated. This technique is a combination of top-down electrode fabrication and bottom-up nanoparticle trapping. As regards this technique, nanoparticles (CdSe/ZnS core-shell nanoparticles) in a solvent were electrostatically trapped in a nanometer-sized gap between two electrodes formed on a p-type silicon on an insulator (SOI) wafer. The width of the nanogap, which was created by electron-beam lithography, was 200 nm. The trapped nanoparticles maintained a bridged form between the electrodes even after the solvent evaporated. Electroluminescence from the nanoparticles in the gap was observed when a voltage was applied to the electrodes. We measured an optical spectrum of the emission to find a peak which corresponds to the bandgap of the nanoparticles. A micro-photoluminescence measurement using a 405 nm laser suggested that the rest of the electrically induced emission was the black body emission of the locally heated nanoparticles. SEM observation showed that the emission area was small, i.e., 60 000 nm2. The nano light source fabricated by our new method is useful for integration with other devices owing to the simplicity of the fabrication method.
    http://iopscience.iop.org/0960-1317/...7_16_7_023.pdf


    and this...
    nanoLight Technologies

    The nanoCam™ concept sidesteps the old external lens, allowing the camera to overcome physical-optical limitations to become truly nanosized. This revolutionary technology allows a high definition mega-pixel camera to be flattened to about the width of a human hair.
    Introducing The NanoCam™
    NanoCam? - An Ultra-Miniature Multi Lens Array 3D Camera
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  8. #7  
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    Not exactly a camera in a single beam of light is it? You are hopeless. Goodbye.
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    Been reading through a little and have a question here. Correct me if I am wrong, because I do not know very much at all. But... Have you ever heard of a beam splitter? Or broad lights that contain the full spectrum? These lights can be made into singular beams then split into other arrangements. I also have read that a camera uses light to record all information it comes into contact with, sending back the information to the source so it can then be translated and converted into physical forms of media. And so the light itself is not really a camera par se, but it is the part that sees and retains the information it comes into contact with. So if you look close enough at a ray of light you can see it as a camera already, just not in physical form. It has the information within it you just need a way to translate what it has within it. And this is a property of light, if you make it singular or an array. But I suppose that merely one ray would be hard pressed to attain a vast area of information and so would only illuminate a small section.
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  10. #9  
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    oh coolness, get this... imagine that since retains information and bounces it back to the source, in a way like our eyes send out and back to us information and retain it in memory... imaginbe that light retains all information every 'touched' at one source position!!! Wow you could potentially have an infinite camera, or all information recording array, inside of one ray of light even....

    pretty cool huh?

    too far out right??? a real stretch...

    well at least i imagine so... is that OK?
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  11. #10  
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    Quote Originally Posted by emilito View Post
    So if you look close enough at a ray of light you can see it as a camera already, just not in physical form.
    The light does have information in it. That doesn't make it a camera.
    It has the information within it you just need a way to translate what it has within it.
    Yes. You need a camera.
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  12. #11  
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    I wouldn't be so sure about that...

    Harvard and MIT scientists are challenging the conventional wisdom about light, and they didn't need to go to a galaxy far, far away to do it.


    "Working with colleagues at the Harvard-MIT Center for Ultracold Atoms, a group led by Harvard Professor of Physics Mikhail Lukin and MIT Professor of Physics Vladan Vuletic have managed to coax photons into binding together to form molecules a state of matter that, until recently, had been purely theoretical. The work is described in a September 25 paper in Nature.
    The discovery, Lukin said, runs contrary to decades of accepted wisdom about the nature of light. Photons have long been described as massless particles which don't interact with each other shine two laser beams at each other, he said, and they simply pass through one another.
    "Photonic molecules," however, behave less like traditional lasers and more like something you might find in science fiction the light saber.
    "Most of the properties of light we know about originate from the fact that photons are massless, and that they do not interact with each other," Lukin said. "What we have done is create a special type of medium in which photons interact with each other so strongly that they begin to act as though they have mass, and they bind together to form molecules. This type of photonic bound state has been discussed theoretically for quite a while, but until now it hadn't been observed.
    "It's not an in-apt analogy to compare this to light sabers," Lukin added. "When these photons interact with each other, they're pushing against and deflect each other. The physics of what's happening in these molecules is similar to what we see in the movies."
    To get the normally-massless photons to bind to each other, Lukin and colleagues, including Harvard post-doctoral fellow Ofer Fisterberg, former Harvard doctoral student Alexey Gorshkov and MIT graduate students Thibault Peyronel and Qiu Liang couldn't rely on something like the Force they instead turned to a set of more extreme conditions."


    Scientists create never-before-seen form of matter
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  13. #12  
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    Quote Originally Posted by serloco View Post
    Nano-size computer hailed as breakthrough

    Scientists in California say they have built a functioning microscopic computer made of carbon "nanotubes" instead of silicon. The step could lead to faster, ever-smaller electronic devices.

    Stanford University researchers said they have overcome downsizing limits posed by silicon transistors in everyday computers by using tiny semiconductors from rolled-up arrays of carbon atoms called "nanotubes" in a basic computer.
    Carbon nanotubes are rolled-up, single-layer sheets of carbon atoms. Tens of thousands can fit into the width of a single human hair.
    The minute prototype using several thousand carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was able to perform basic counting and number-sorting functions, said engineering professor Subhasish Mitra.
    "People have been talking about a new era of carbon nanotube (CNT) electronics moving beyond silicon," Mitra said. "Here is the proof."
    Manufacture possible
    A Stanford University announcement - also covered by the journal Nature - quoted the director of a computer chip design consortium, Naresh Shanbhag, as saying that industrial-scale production of the CNT semiconductors was possible within years.
    Another Stanford project leader, Philip Wong, said carbon nanotubes used less power and were smaller than silicon circuits.

    He was referring to a postulate first raised in 1965 that manufacturers can double the density of silicon transistors roughly every two years, but only down to 5 nanometers. Silicon's limit is expected to be reached around 2020."CNT's could take us at least an order of magnitude in performance beyond where you can project silicon could take us."
    Furthermore, silicon transistors packed onto conventional chips generate more heat and waste power.
    Stanford University said its researchers had achieved an "unprecedented feat" with the nanotube technology, which has been around for 15 years, by also creating a "powerful algorithm" to handle imperfections in the carbon tunnels and map out a circuit. This was "guaranteed to work no matter whether or where CNTs might be askew," the university said.
    'Significant advance'
    German hybrid electronics expert, Frank Kreupl of the Munich's Technical University commented in the Nature edition that the Stanford nanotube computer represented a significant advance.
    He added, however, that the CNT transistors would have to become even smaller for the technique to be feasible and the processors quicker.


    Nano-size computer hailed as breakthrough | News | DW.DE | 27.09.2013
    Very interesting article, though how much would have to change for this technology to replace silicon given that 99.9999% of today's electronics are based on silicon technology? And what percentage of the current industry would have to change? I'm still a year away from taking any integrated circuit design or manufacturing courses at university so I have a very limited understanding of that industry.
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