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  1. #1 power 
    Forum Senior anand_kapadia's Avatar
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    What would be the voltage required to electromagnetize 3-5 kg of iron?
    I want it for one of my project.


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  3. #2  
    Forum Professor leohopkins's Avatar
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    Im not sure that voltage makes a difference ?
    I think its more amps that you need ??


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  4. #3  
    Forum Ph.D. Nevyn's Avatar
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    i am sure this same question was posted in a different topic a while agp
    Come see some of my art work at http://nevyn-pendragon.deviantart.com/
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  5. #4  
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    Any coil wrapped around the iron, with a current flowing through it will magnetise the iron. It just depends how long you want to wait.....
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  6. #5  
    Forum Freshman wonkothesane's Avatar
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    It depends on how strong a magnetic field you want to generate. The magnetic field is proportional to the number of windings in your magnetising coil and the magnetising current. The properties of the iron are also important as well as the shape and size. I'm assuming a DC supply in which case the voltage drop over the coil can be neglected except when switching on and off so the required voltage depends (given you have chosen a magnetising curent) on the resistance of the rest of your circuit. The circuit resistance should be large enough to damp the transient response to avoid voltage spikes when you switch the circuit on or off. Better still a capacitor and resistor.
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  7. #6  
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    Yep I gave him all that the first time he asked, including pointing him to maxwell's field equations, and a set of empirical tables, but he keep asking....

    see:-

    http://www.thescienceforum.com/viewt...gnetize+++iron

    Incidentally, I'm not sure your comment on transients is correct, although there will be a back emf, this does not reverse the magnet field it merely collapses, the back emf opposes the applied voltage only.
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