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Thread: New Ultra battery design

  1. #1 New Ultra battery design 
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    New ultra-battery is the most powerful non-nuclear energy storage ever

    How much do you think this would store? Would you think it was rechargeable (the article doesn't say)?
    1 million atmospheres is about 14,700,000 lbs/in^2.


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  3. #2  
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    This thing is going to take some REAL hard thought to implement large-scale! But, who knows? jocular


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  4. #3  
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    Why? Say a single 2"x3"x1/2" cell has the storage capacity of a lawnmower battery (just for discussion). Why would you need to think hard to implement this? As it is crystalline in nature, it will probably just shatter when you draw the energy out of it, not explode as some would think.
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  5. #4  
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    How much do you think this would store? Would you think it was rechargeable (the article doesn't say)?
    What they describe is not electrochemical battery at all but some hypothetical energy storage which works in better case as an explosive.
    Antislavery
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  6. #5  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stanley514 View Post
    How much do you think this would store? Would you think it was rechargeable (the article doesn't say)?
    What they describe is not electrochemical battery at all but some hypothetical energy storage which works in better case as an explosive.
    Why? Diamonds are formed under great pressure, and they don't explode. This stores pressure energy as chemical energy in much the same way. If the crystals are polarized, however, why would it work better as an explosive?
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  7. #6  
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    Diamonds are formed under great pressure, and they don't explode.
    Right - which means they are not very useful as energy storage devices. An energy storage device has to be able to release the energy stored within itself. If it can release it quickly the risk of fire or explosion is significant.
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  8. #7  
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    Diamonds are formed under great pressure, and they don't explode. This stores pressure energy as chemical energy in much the same way. If the crystals are polarized, however, why would it work better as an explosive?
    Could they produce direct current in a battery? It is not feasible as an electric energy storage. But diamonds could burn and release some energy...
    Antislavery
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  9. #8  
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    It may have taken enormous pressure to make diamonds but you won't get any more energy burning them than a lump of coal. The energy released by C + O x 2 ought to be the same (or only marginally different due to the energy requirement to break existing chemical bonds) whether the C is diamond, graphite or coal. I think graphene has more potential for batteries than XeF2 and may turn out to be a more valuable allotrope of carbon than diamonds and more important than coal.
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  10. #9  
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    The problem wouls be cost. If it cost to much then why build it. Say it cost over 1000.00 to build , with rechargeable batteriues you could use them over and over for a whole lot less money than this one. I'm sure it costs more than it is worth but perhaps one day those costs might come downand it could be used at room temperatures.
    When the power of love overcomes the love of power the world will know peace.
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  11. #10  
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    I wonder how diamonds would work as the carbon in a Li-ion battery. Could you make capacitors out of thin layers of diamonds?
    Just a thought.
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  12. #11  
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheUnknowable View Post
    I wonder how diamonds would work as the carbon in a Li-ion battery. Could you make capacitors out of thin layers of diamonds?
    Just a thought.
    Or you could try graphene.
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  13. #12  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Fabos View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by TheUnknowable View Post
    I wonder how diamonds would work as the carbon in a Li-ion battery. Could you make capacitors out of thin layers of diamonds?
    Just a thought.
    Or you could try graphene.
    The thing with graphene is that it can only handle 3.5 volts at 550 farads (theoretical max) per gram in a typical capacitor. The closer you put the plates, the more capacitance you get, but the lower the voltage is. The equation for the amount of energy stored in joules is .5*capacitance*Voltage^2. The best way to increase that amount is to have both high voltage and high capacitance. A 100 farad cap at 100 volts would hold 500,000 joules of energy, or 138.9 amp hours at 1 volt. At 12 that would be 11.57 amp hours, but would weigh next to nothing and could easily be stacked to give you the storage capacity you needed.
    Diamonds have much stronger molecular bonds, so they should be able to handle more voltage.
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  14. #13  
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    The thing with graphene is that it can only handle 3.5 volts at 550 farads (theoretical max) per gram in a typical capacitor.
    If I no make mistake this limitation mostly relates to liquid electrolyte. Graphene is used in supecaps because it is conductor, not because it is dielectric. Principally you could replace grapheme with copper if you will succeed to achieve the same porosity and surface area.
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