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Thread: Low Noise Amplifier

  1. #1 Low Noise Amplifier 
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    How to design a CMOS Low Noise Amplifier for a frequency range of 100 MHz to 1.77 GHz in Agilent Advanced Design System, only complete schematic?


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    Enter the ever present homework question.


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    Quote Originally Posted by seeiumaan View Post
    How to design a CMOS Low Noise Amplifier for a frequency range of 100 MHz to 1.77 GHz in Agilent Advanced Design System, only complete schematic?
    As TheUnknowable has commented, you are obviously working on a homework problem. This forum's policy is not to do homework for you. However, if you've gotten stuck somewhere, tell us what you have done so far, and specifically where your problem lies. Don't just ask us to do your work for you. That won't fly.
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    Hmmmm to sound like a complete noob, an amplifier for this frequency range that would simply be for broadcast right? I'm a sound tech and come from a land of 20-20KHz amplification (which is a completely different kettle of fish) just want to know what this would be used for
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jrace View Post
    Hmmmm to sound like a complete noob, an amplifier for this frequency range that would simply be for broadcast right? I'm a sound tech and come from a land of 20-20KHz amplification (which is a completely different kettle of fish) just want to know what this would be used for
    It's hard to say, but we can make up something. The frequency range covers a lot of the spectrum used by terrestrial wireless -- including TV bands, cellular, and GPS, all of which would presumably benefit from low-noise amplification. The range also includes the all-important (to radioastronomers) 21cm hydrogen line (the "HI line"). That corresponds to about 1.42GHz; a 100MHz lower band edge would allow for observation of redshifted hydrogen lines from the distant past (the "epoch of reionization").

    Observations of the HI line (their Doppler shifts), by the way, is used to infer things like galaxy rotation curves. These observations led to some of the earliest quantitative hints of the existence of cold dark matter.

    ETA: I asked an astronomer friend about the curiously specific 1.77GHz upper frequency limit in the OP. He noted that it's a frequency commonly used in satellite communications.
    Last edited by tk421; August 20th, 2013 at 03:01 PM.
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    A low noise amplifier and shaper chip has been designed and built in 1.5 μm CMOS technology to be used for readout of Si microstrip detectors. The chip is optimized with respect to noise. Microstrip Measurements on the performance of the prototype chip are presented. Ghz freequency not perfect for Satellite purpose uses Khz, MHz may run long distance. GHz unable to run long. Thanks>>>>Engineer Remon
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    Hmm... July 16th to Sep 11th... If it was a homework question, it's long since passed. If it was a project, he's lost interest.
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    Amplifiers for those frequencies are probably hard to design.Mostly sizes and parasitics are a problem.My approach,if it would be of any help,would be like any other amplifier design.Do one circuit at a time.And don't forget in phase feedback from a couple of stages up.My experiences have been mostly with analog designs.With cmos and programable digital circuits it might be a little different.
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  10. #9 Thanks Pot Raost" 
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pot Raost View Post
    Amplifiers for those frequencies are probably hard to design.Mostly sizes and parasitics are a problem.My approach,if it would be of any help,would be like any other amplifier design.Do one circuit at a time.And don't forget in phase feedback from a couple of stages up.My experiences have been mostly with analog designs.With cmos and programable digital circuits it might be a little different.
    i agreed with you. cmos and programable digital circuits it might be a little different. in this case.
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    I couldn't answer your question....the amp is there...the mic, if I even need one is there....

    if I have to test them before performance...not a problem

    but how they work?

    er ...

    never was in my field...I rarely need a mic unless I have a rock band
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    here CMOS Low Noise Amplifier attached Imgur Photo about it. imgur: the simple image sharer
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    Please highlight ur message receiver name... Thanks @babe
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    Quote Originally Posted by tk421 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Jrace View Post
    Hmmmm to sound like a complete noob, an amplifier for this frequency range that would simply be for broadcast right? I'm a sound tech and come from a land of 20-20KHz amplification (which is a completely different kettle of fish) just want to know what this would be used for
    It's hard to say, but we can make up something. The frequency range covers a lot of the spectrum used by terrestrial wireless -- including TV bands, cellular, and GPS, all of which would presumably benefit from low-noise amplification. The range also includes the all-important (to radioastronomers) 21cm hydrogen line (the "HI line"). That corresponds to about 1.42GHz; a 100MHz lower band edge would allow for observation of redshifted hydrogen lines from the distant past (the "epoch of reionization").

    Observations of the HI line (their Doppler shifts), by the way, is used to infer things like galaxy rotation curves. These observations led to some of the earliest quantitative hints of the existence of cold dark matter.

    ETA: I asked an astronomer friend about the curiously specific 1.77GHz upper frequency limit in the OP. He noted that it's a frequency commonly used in satellite communications.
    "Hey Ma!!!! I done learned me sumthin'!"
    Fixin' shit that ain't broke.
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    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    I couldn't answer your question....the amp is there...the mic, if I even need one is there....

    if I have to test them before performance...not a problem

    but how they work?

    er ...

    never was in my field...I rarely need a mic unless I have a rock band
    The vibrations from your voice move a diaphragm inside of the mic which is attached to a coil of wire and a magnet. When the magnet moves inside of the coil of wire, (or vice versa) an electrical current is created in the same vibration pattern as your voice. This signal is tiny, and is sent into the amp.

    Imagine the amp is your garden hose faucet. the small signal is like your hand, turning the faucet on and off, in the same pattern as your voice vibrations...so a small current, is controlling the flow of a much bigger current. You can add extra stages of amplification, and use the garden hose to control a fire hydrant....so you end up with a signal that is the same as the original, only much more powerful, and can deafen Pete Townshend.
    Fixin' shit that ain't broke.
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    Quote Originally Posted by remon7 View Post
    Please highlight ur message receiver name... Thanks @babe
    Sorry, usually do
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  17. #16  
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    I couldn't answer your question....the amp is there...the mic, if I even need one is there....

    if I have to test them before performance...not a problem

    but how they work?

    er ...

    never was in my field...I rarely need a mic unless I have a rock band
    The vibrations from your voice move a diaphragm inside of the mic which is attached to a coil of wire and a magnet. When the magnet moves inside of the coil of wire, (or vice versa) an electrical current is created in the same vibration pattern as your voice. This signal is tiny, and is sent into the amp.

    Imagine the amp is your garden hose faucet. the small signal is like your hand, turning the faucet on and off, in the same pattern as your voice vibrations...so a small current, is controlling the flow of a much bigger current. You can add extra stages of amplification, and use the garden hose to control a fire hydrant....so you end up with a signal that is the same as the original, only much more powerful, and can deafen Pete Townshend.
    Thanks.
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    Got it Thanks
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