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Thread: Re: Remote control fan regulator

  1. #1 Re: Remote control fan regulator 
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    Hi, i am a student of electronics & communication engineering 2nd year,i want to make a project like "remote control fan regulator "..can u give some suggestion please.


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  3. #2  
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    It would probably be a pretty simple thing to do using remote control actuators such as made for robotics or remote control cars. What kind of fan are you talking about, and why would it need a remote control?


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  4. #3  
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    Remote control anything you need to decide how remote you want to make it. IR's or bluetooth will work for short range, dedicated radio for longer range. Depending on what you choose it will alter your design.
    Ignorance more frequently begets confidence, than it does knowledge. [Charles Darwin]
    Physical laws are kinda like Pringles. It is hard to break just one law. [Dr. Rocket]
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  5. #4  
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    Since a fan only has a few settings...low, medium, high and off....what about using a DTMF chip to send and recieve a signal? I could see a system where you have 4 buttons on the remote. Press a button and a DTMF signal get passed through an amp to an antennae. (or IR LED) On the reciever end, the recieving DTMF chip enterprets the signal, and logic gates turn on or off one of 4 relays that applies the appropriate amount of current to the fan for that setting.
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  6. #5  
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  7. #6  
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    Actually i want to construct a remote by which i can operate rpm speed & on/off of the ac fan which I use in daily life(i.e. a normal fan in ac) .It enables the user to operate a fan regulator from approximately 10 meters away. The remote transmits a tone using an infrared light-emitting diode. This tone is decoded by a receiver, since the receiver only switches when the tone is received.
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  8. #7  
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    With two of the dual tone/ multiple frequency transceiver chips (like the one I posted) You could use one for the remote, and one for the receiver. Since most fans (and I assume yours does too) have 4 settings, the 4 bit data bus would be easy to use. Just have 4 buttons that each apply power to each one of the pins of the input so that:
    0001 = Off
    0010 = Low
    0100 = Medium
    1000 = High

    Then connect the output of the DTMF chip to a IR LED (or throw an op amp in between, if the chip output doesn't have enough power to directly drive the LED) On the receiver end, connect a photocell to the input of the DTMF reciever (again with an OP amp in between if needed) The 4 output pins would connect to 4 small relays (via a gate to keep them on) that would apply AC power to the fan through the fan's existing rotary switch. Just get rid of the roter, and directly connect to each one of the terminals on the fans switch.

    Does that make sense?
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  9. #8  
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    Do I have to use any micro controller program or can you give some simple circuit that I can build it ?
    what about the transmitter portion ,what I have to do & how we receive the signal can you please enplane that ?
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  10. #9  
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    Super simple circuit that I described. The two MT8880C's do the transmitting and recieving. You just need to connect an IR LED on the output of the transmitter, and a photocell to the input of reciever. How much experience do you have with electronics?
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  11. #10  
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    I am 1 year 6 months experience, in this i can build the circuit & solder the circuit , but I have not much experience in electronics because I have not done any training on micro controller or embedded system .Now I am doing some projects so that I can get some practical knowledge & I will do the training on next semester.That is why I am doing this little project.
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  12. #11  
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    I tried to come up with the most basic design I could. You will probably will need some classes on basic DC and AC theory, transitors, op amps, and digital circuits before you would be able actually design and construct a circuit like this. I went to a 2 year electronics school, that was broken up into 8 quarters. I was in 5th quarter before I had everything I needed to build something like this.
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  13. #12  
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    If your just starting out....there are a few things you will need. One of the most helpful things for prototyping circuits is a bread board:


    Example: https://www.google.com/shopping/prod...d=0CJwBEPMCMAc

    This allows you to plug in components and connect them together to test the circuit before you finalize it. Another is a variable DC voltage power supply. Now this is something you could build for yourself, and would be useful with other projects. Here's an example of what it would look like:

    If I were you, I would put the remote control fan project on the back burner, until you get a little training in school. I would be happy to help you with the design and construction of a power supply. This would be something that you could use to help you learn. A couple of other things you might consider getting yourself is a multi-meter:

    That's a Fluke 87...I used to have one. Fluke is the "Cadillac" of meters. They are kind of expensive ($400us)...but you get a basic meter for much much less. Example: https://www.google.com/shopping/prod...d=0CLEBEPMCMAY

    You also might get your self a package of assorted resistors:

    example: https://www.google.com/shopping/prod...ed=0CFQQ8wIwAA

    Resistors will be the first component that you learn about in school. They will help you learn how Ohm's law works.

    The first thing they teach you in electronics school is "Ohm's Law". It's like the foundation for all electronics learning. I would "wiki" ohm's law and do some reading. It tells you the relationship between voltage, current, resistance and power.

    The two main formulas of Ohm's law are:

    Voltage (Volts) = Current (Amps) X Resistance (Ohms)
    and
    Power (Watts) = Voltage (Volts) X Current (amps)

    One other thing you can start training yourself in is reading the color codes on resistors. Resistors are too small to actually print text on, so they use 4 color bands to indicate how many ohms of resistance that resistor has. You can read about it here: Electronic color code - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



    The first band tells you the first digit. The second tells you second digit. The 3rd tells you how many zeros to put behind those two numbers. The 4th band tells you the tolerance..or the % of accuracy of that value.



    On the example I gave above, you can see the color code is brown(1) black(0) red(2) and gold(5% tolerance)....so That's 1, 0, and 2 zeros behind or 1000 ohms or 1Kohm. The 5% tolerance means the actual measured resistance will be between 950 ohms and 1050 ohms.

    Being able to instantly recognize the color codes will be very useful for you. (It's also the reason you'll never find a color-blind electronic tech. )

    Let me know if any of this interests you, or you have any questions. It's no inconvenience....I love this sort of thing!!!
    Last edited by MacGyver1968; January 29th, 2013 at 11:00 AM.
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  14. #13  
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    One other thing you might consider if you're going to get into electronics (and your wife will hate me for this ) is to start stock-pileing junk electronics...particularly older stuff...like from the 70's. Going to the parts store and buying brand new components can get expensive. Many of the standard components can be salvaged from used stuff. You said you can soldier, I assume you can also de-soldier.

    Check this out:



    Just a bunch of junk boards from something...but look at all of the useful parts you could salvage. That middle one is especially cool. There's a couple of nice transformers, a bunch of electrolytic capacitors, diodes, connectors, a heat sink for a transitor. Just guessing, but 3/4 of parts you would need to build your power supply could be harvested off that one board. The board below has a bunch of nice push buttons..the other has some potentiometers (variable resistors) and small dip switches. Hey...why pay for stuff when you can get it for free!
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  15. #14  
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    I have done several experiment by the breadboard in the college lab,I know the color code of the resistance also & I use it some experiment, also I have done the classes of op-amp ,transistor,diode etc.
    The main thing is that I am not so much clear about the application of this electronics equipment or devices .that is why I am asking .I can do soldiering but I do not know what is de-soldier.
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  16. #15  
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    Please ex-plane this line I am not understanding "why pay for stuff when you can get it for free!" ,my English is not very good.
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  17. #16  
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    If you are interested in building a variable DC power supply, here is a schematic of the design:



    Pretty much the only thing you would have to buy is the LM317 voltage regulator. All of the other components could easily be found on salvaged boards...because a basic power supply is a super common circuit...virtually everything uses one.

    Basically the parts you would need to look for are:

    1. An AC power cord recitical, on/off switch and fuse holder. Here's one all together:


    2. A small step down transformer:


    3. A bridge rectifier:


    4. 2 electrolytic caps: 1000 uF (microfarad) and a 1 uf:



    5. A .1 uf capacitor:


    6. An LM317 with a small heat sink:


    7. A 5k ohm potentiometer:


    8. 240 ohm 1/4 watt resistor (red(2), yellow(4), Brown(1):


    9. Maybe some banana plugs and recepticals to connect the output to your breadboard:



    With these parts and a small prototype board...you're good to go.
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  18. #17  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dibyendu View Post
    Please ex-plane this line I am not understanding "why pay for stuff when you can get it for free!" ,my English is not very good.
    Going to the store to buy components is expensive. You can find many old boards in the trash for no cost, and salvage the components you need for free.
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  19. #18  
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    De-soldier means to remove the soldier from a board so you can remove a component from the board. You heat up the solder with your iron, then use either a copper wick or suction device to suck up the melted soldier.
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  20. #19  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dibyendu View Post
    I have done several experiment by the breadboard in the college lab,I know the color code of the resistance also & I use it some experiment, also I have done the classes of op-amp ,transistor,diode etc.
    The main thing is that I am not so much clear about the application of this electronics equipment or devices .that is why I am asking .I can do soldiering but I do not know what is de-soldier.
    If you have those classes then you probably would be able to build the remote fan circuit. I'm sorry...misunderstood you, I thought you hadn't been to school yet.


    Just curious...where are you from? I live in Dallas, Texas.
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  21. #20  
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    Would you like me to try to put together a schematic and parts list for my remote fan control design?
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  22. #21  
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    Here's a basic concept design for the transmitter. Not all connections and components are pictured. Just to give you basic idea.



    The diagram says DPDT...but thats incorrect. They should be double pole, single throw momentary push button switches.

    When you push button 1, pole one sends 5 volts to the first data pin, and pole 2 grounds the other 3 pins....and so forth.
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  23. #22  
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    And here's the receiving circuit:

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  24. #23  
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    yes I would Like to try to put together a schematic and parts list for my remote fan control design.
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  25. #24  
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    please give me some doc or PDF/URL on the equipments used in this circuit,that will be better to understand the logic because to make this we have to understand this properly.
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  26. #25  
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    Can any receiver( you have given me the circuit diagram of receiver) be run without being coding of micro-controller ,because I doc not know how to code in a micro-controller?
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  27. #26  
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    Dibyendu, are you online? If you are, lets talk in the chat room on the main page of this forum. It might make explaining some things easier. If you aren't into that, that's ok...we can talk here.
    Last edited by MacGyver1968; January 30th, 2013 at 11:12 AM.
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  28. #27  
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    The two circuits I designed are just "off the top of my head"...they are just concepts. I'm not really sure if they will even work as planned. All of the components in the designs are standard components: Momentary push buttons, resistors, capacitors, relays, opamps and flip-flop latch gates. The only IC is the 8880C. It's not a micro-controller, and doesn't need coding. It's a dual tone multiply frequency encoder/decoder. You have probably used one before, but didn't know it. They are in every touch tone phone. When you press the "1" button on a touch tone phone, you hear a funny sounding tone out of the ear piece. It's actually two tones playing at once. They sound a bit funny because the frequencies of the two tones are selected specifically so their harmonics don't interfere with each other. Those two tones are sent down the phone line, and on the other end, a DTMF decoder recognizes the tones, and outputs a "1".

    DTMF tones are standardized. Here's a graph of them:


    So when you press "1", two tones, one at 1209hz and one at 697hz are generated at the output. There are 16 combinations of tones. That's why the chip has 4 digital data pins:

    0000 = 0
    0001 = 1
    0010 = 2
    0011 = 3
    0100 = 4
    0101 = 5
    0110 = 6
    0111 = 7
    1000 = 8
    1001 = 9
    1010 = 10
    1011 = 11
    1100 = 12
    1101 = 13
    1110 = 14
    1111 = 15

    16 combinations for 4 bits. Since we only have 4 states for our fan...to make things easy I choose the numbers 1, 2, 4, 8 since they only need one pin to be activated to work. On our circuit, when you press "button 1", it puts "0001" on the 4 data pins, and the 8880c will output tones at 1209hz and one at 697hz. Those tones are sent through the infared LED. On the other end, the photocell picks up the tones, and sends them to the input of the DTMF decoder. The decoder interprets the two tones, and puts "0001" on its 4 output data pins....the same number we put in. When that data pin energizes, it closes a relay (with a latch to keep it closed) which sends 120/240AC power to the fan.

    Does that make sense?

    Here is a datasheet for the 8880c:
    http://www.zarlink.com/zarlink/mt888...et-sep2005.pdf
    Last edited by MacGyver1968; January 30th, 2013 at 12:04 PM.
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  29. #28  
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    Please let me know if my Texas English is hard to understand...or if I use any phrases that are hard to understand. I will try to re-phrase things.
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  30. #29  
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    Yes I am online But can U tell me how can WE chat directly?
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  31. #30  
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    On the front page there is a chat box...here is a link to the full chat box:

    Smilies - The Science Forum
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  32. #31  
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    Once again mac please give the diagram of relays you have been Used......What is the value of the relay you have given me the circuit?
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    What is the value or reading in watt/volt of op-amp 1 &2,relay,8880c,photocell,bridge rectifier,pot 1,LM 317,IR led that you have given me in the circuit .Please give me the details of that so that we can arranged the equipments.
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  34. #33  
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    If your around...I'm in chat again.
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  35. #34  
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    The circuit I designed isn't a fully finalized circuit...it's just a basic concept idea to work from. But I'll see if I can answer your questions. For op amps...we could a few LM741's. Here's the data sheet for them. http://www.ti.com/lit/ds/symlink/lm741.pdf. They can be powered by up to 22 volts....but we will just be powering them with 5. They have a 1/2 watt power capability.

    For relays. We can use something like this : Relay SPDT 5v 5 volt coil. The switch will handle up to 16 amps.

    I already posted the datasheet for the 8880c. It should have all of the information you need. I've never used one...so you'll have to just give it a try.

    For bridge rectifiers...something like this will work: https://www.google.com/shopping/prod...ed=0CGoQ8wIwAw

    For pots...we could use a trimmer pot like this...just needs to be a 5kohm. https://www.google.com/shopping/product/4242553117801477540?q=5 k potentiometer&hl=en&safe=off&biw=1920&bih=1094&sa= X&ei=_4YKUaWnMbDs2AW354HoCwved=0CIQBEPMCMAQ4Cg

    We don't need an LM317 for this project. But you might get one to build yourself a variable voltage power supply to power other projects you may have.

    Something like this for the LED :https://www.google.com/shopping/prod...ed=0CGQQ8wIwAA

    Most of this stuff can be salvaged from old, broken electronic equiptment. I would look around the trash bins before buying anything.
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