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Thread: About electrons and holes.....

  1. #1 About electrons and holes..... 
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    Hi everyone!

    A friend and I have been having this debate for the last couple of hours about holes and electrons. The question basically is "When a free electron moves a ______ is formed in its place." She says it has to be a hole, and I take the opposite view that a positive ion would develop.

    I've already talked of the absence of holes in metals but well, I just haven't been able to convince her.

    Now, I am assuming I am right (do correct me if not!), I just need some points to validate my view and counter hers. Thanks in advance!


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  3. #2 Re: About electrons and holes..... 
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    Quote Originally Posted by netnut
    Hi everyone!

    A friend and I have been having this debate for the last couple of hours about holes and electrons. The question basically is "When a free electron moves a ______ is formed in its place." She says it has to be a hole, and I take the opposite view that a positive ion would develop.

    I've already talked of the absence of holes in metals but well, I just haven't been able to convince her.

    Now, I am assuming I am right (do correct me if not!), I just need some points to validate my view and counter hers. Thanks in advance!
    I was taught that an electron only moves because there is an abundance of them in one place compared to another place. The abundance just pushes them to the area short of electrons.

    No holes. Just less electrons, in one place, with the same volume of space, as another equal volume of space, with more electrons in it.



    Sincerely,


    William McCormick


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  4. #3  
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    Thank you so much. Anymore arguments that I can put forward?
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  5. #4  
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    That depends on how you're learning. Strictly speaking, William is mostly correct.

    However, electrons and holes are used as a teaching tool in universities now. The basic idea is that when an electron jumps from one material into another, you have a lack of that electron in the original material. In school, or at least my classes, this was described as a Hole. A hole is a non-existent entity/place holder for the positive charge left in the original material.

    So, the OP was correct in the sense that that is how it is taught. In my experience, it just makes things more confusing. Just remember, when an electron leaves a material, it "leaves" a positive charge behind.
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  6. #5  
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    In my experience, it just makes things more confusing. Just remember, when an electron leaves a material, it "leaves" a positive charge behind.
    Hmm.... so do you mean to say that when a valence electron leaves atom 'A' and goes to 'B' without having left the material entirely, it has left a positive charge behind? How would the situation differ if the atom were a metallic one instead of a semiconductor element's?
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  7. #6  
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    Quote Originally Posted by netnut
    In my experience, it just makes things more confusing. Just remember, when an electron leaves a material, it "leaves" a positive charge behind.
    Hmm.... so do you mean to say that when a valence electron leaves atom 'A' and goes to 'B' without having left the material entirely, it has left a positive charge behind? How would the situation differ if the atom were a metallic one instead of a semiconductor element's?

    There is no difference to my knowledge, between metallic atoms and free electrons. And semiconductor atoms and free electrons. Electrons and matter are what they are.

    Despite the vast differences of opinion about them.

    The actual technology was all put away with a God awful might in the sixties. Some older fellows would say it was all put away during World War Two. And it just resurfaced in the late forties and early fifties.

    MADD radar fell off the earth, for the cold wars. Ha-Ha.

    It is really unbelievable, but they really came out and said, that they were going to hide the secret of the atom form American citizens. For our own safety. Meanwhile every freak and criminal had the information already.

    It really just hurt honest American citizens by causing a lot of factory accidents.

    Sincerely,


    William McCormick
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    THe answer is Positive ion. THink about it, there really is no such thing as a hole! if you believe there is, send me one. THe word is merely used to describe an object that has had a piece removed or ar an object that looks as though it may have had a piece removed.
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  9. #8  
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    Hmm. Try and remember that an electron strictly speaking s a "potential" and due to the heisengerb uncertainty principle it is impossible to say "there it is!" and then notice a "hole" when its not there.

    Besides, the "hole" you speak of I presume you mean the vacuum of space. Well, space is not a perfect vacuum at any point, it is always filled with latent energy, photons and very possibly, the higgs field.
    The hand of time rested on the half-hour mark, and all along that old front line of the English there came a whistling and a crying. The men of the first wave climbed up the parapets, in tumult, darkness, and the presence of death, and having done with all pleasant things, advanced across No Man's Land to begin the Battle of the Somme. - Poet John Masefield.

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