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Thread: Question about chemistry webinars

  1. #1 Question about chemistry webinars 
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    Hello! My name is Alexey, a private chemistry teacher from Russia (the Russian Federation). I plan to organize free-of-charges webinars on chemistry for students and schoolchildren who intend to pass university entrance examinations. Please, suggest me how I can find the audience for my courses? Is such distance education valuable in countries as USA, Canada and UK?
    There are a couple of words about my background. I took a PhD Degree in Plant biochemistry at the University of Bremen (Germany) and have many years’ experience in teaching chemistry.

    Thanks for your attention!


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  3. #2  
    exchemist
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chemon View Post
    Hello! My name is Alexey, a private chemistry teacher from Russia (the Russian Federation). I plan to organize free-of-charges webinars on chemistry for students and schoolchildren who intend to pass university entrance examinations. Please, suggest me how I can find the audience for my courses? Is such distance education valuable in countries as USA, Canada and UK?
    There are a couple of words about my background. I took a PhD Degree in Plant biochemistry at the University of Bremen (Germany) and have many years’ experience in teaching chemistry.

    Thanks for your attention!
    We have a member of the forum (PhDemon) who has a D Phil in chemistry and is now practising as a teacher. He may be your best adviser.

    My own impression is that web-based learning aids are often used as supplements or exercises to school work, but not so much as direct substitutes for it. As for audiences, I'd have thought that would be a matter of advertising on the web. Maybe you might consider starting with information and exercises first and then progress to interactive webinars once your reputation is established. But I am really speculating.


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    Bullshit Intolerant PhDemon's Avatar
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    I agree, they are handy to point students to for revision help or extra-curricular assignments / general interest but we don't tend to use videos or webinars as direct teaching aids. The students do tend to use youtube videos a lot (there are some good worked examples and guides on how to solve certain questions out there) so if you upload them there and give them a catchy title you will get some hits and may be able to start to build up a reputation.

    (And it's a PhD, I did my doctorate at "the other place" )
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  5. #4  
    exchemist
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhDemon View Post
    I agree, they are handy to point students to for revision help or extra-curricular assignments / general interest but we don't tend to use videos or webinars as direct teaching aids. The students do tend to use youtube videos a lot (there are some good worked examples and guides on how to solve certain questions out there) so if you upload them there and give them a catchy title you will get some hits and may be able to start to build up a reputation.

    (And it's a PhD, I did my doctorate at "the other place" )
    Oops sorry, force of habit.
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  6. #5  
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    Thanks for your responses, guys!
    Under the word “webinars” I mean online communication via Skype, not prerecorded video lessons like on youtube. There is another question: Is such method of distance learning popular in western countries?
    As I said before I intend to gather some people who have troubles with chemistry. The lessons I offer are quite practical rather than theoretical. There are a plenty of types of computational problems on chemistry and I can teach how to solve them. Teaching foreign students I will also have opportunity to strengthen my English that I want to be as perfect as my native Russian language.
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  7. #6  
    exchemist
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chemon View Post
    Thanks for your responses, guys!
    Under the word “webinars” I mean online communication via Skype, not prerecorded video lessons like on youtube. There is another question: Is such method of distance learning popular in western countries?
    As I said before I intend to gather some people who have troubles with chemistry. The lessons I offer are quite practical rather than theoretical. There are a plenty of types of computational problems on chemistry and I can teach how to solve them. Teaching foreign students I will also have opportunity to strengthen my English that I want to be as perfect as my native Russian language.
    Yes we understood that. But the doubt is whether many people will sign up for interactive sessions with someone with no reputation. Hence the suggestion - only a suggestion - of creating stand-alone material first, to get yourself known and respected, before trying the interactive stuff. Stand-alone materials can be reviewed by teachers, for instance and then recommended to their students if they find it good. Whereas they are less likely , perhaps, to spend the time attending webinars to check the quality of what you offer.

    Your English appears to be already excellent by the way - at least your written English.
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  8. #7  
    Bullshit Intolerant PhDemon's Avatar
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    A number of our students do pay a private tutor for one to one help (I've done some tutoring myself) but it is very rare for them to do this online, the parents normally want teachers from local schools and/or references to ensure they are CRB checked etc, I don't think you will get much interest for Skype tutorials in these security conscious times...
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    Forum Radioactive Isotope zinjanthropos's Avatar
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    Hey Demon, do you worry about the effects of exposure to certain chemicals?
    All that belongs to human understanding, in this deep ignorance and obscurity, is to be skeptical, or at least cautious; and not to admit of any hypothesis, whatsoever; much less, of any which is supported by no appearance of probability...Hume
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  10. #9  
    Bullshit Intolerant PhDemon's Avatar
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    Not really, if you wear the correct PPE and handle them properly the risk is very low... Occasional accidents will kill/damage you immediately or be of no long term concern. The exposure problem is that cumulative effect of being exposed to high levels for long periods (years) most of the hazardous chemicals I use are only used occasionally and in small amounts.

    Having said that my employer makes me have a lung function test and other medical tests once a year to see if I'm suffering any long term effects (tbh they are just covering their arse)
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    Forum Radioactive Isotope zinjanthropos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhDemon View Post
    Not really, if you wear the correct PPE and handle them properly the risk is very low... Occasional accidents will kill/damage you immediately or be of no long term concern. The exposure problem is that cumulative effect of being exposed to high levels for long periods (years) most of the hazardous chemicals I use are only used occasionally and in small amounts.

    Having said that my employer makes me have a lung function test and other medical tests once a year to see if I'm suffering any long term effects (tbh they are just covering their arse)
    I know they're covering but aren't you personally in favor of it? IOW would you get checked without their prompting?
    All that belongs to human understanding, in this deep ignorance and obscurity, is to be skeptical, or at least cautious; and not to admit of any hypothesis, whatsoever; much less, of any which is supported by no appearance of probability...Hume
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    Bullshit Intolerant PhDemon's Avatar
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    I have a check up with my GP every year, the work one is an extra as part of my contract.
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    Forum Radioactive Isotope zinjanthropos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhDemon View Post
    I have a check up with my GP every year, the work one is an extra as part of my contract.
    Not trying to delve into your private life but someone in the same position as you might need to know.....Are these blood tests and are CT scans or other imaging techniques used during these checks?
    All that belongs to human understanding, in this deep ignorance and obscurity, is to be skeptical, or at least cautious; and not to admit of any hypothesis, whatsoever; much less, of any which is supported by no appearance of probability...Hume
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  14. #13  
    Bullshit Intolerant PhDemon's Avatar
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    The doc normally checks out lung function, my skin, eyes, hearing, blood sugar, cholesterol etc. The work one checks my lung function and skin. If the lung function is impaired (hasn't happened yet) then they would move on to scans and further tests.
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  15. #14  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope zinjanthropos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhDemon View Post
    The doc normally checks out lung function, my skin, eyes, hearing, blood sugar, cholesterol etc. The work one checks my lung function and skin. If the lung function is impaired (hasn't happened yet) then they would move on to scans and further tests.
    Ok Demon, just making sure you're looking after yourself.

    With regard to chemical exposure, I don't know if there is such a thing as a pristine environment to work or live in.
    All that belongs to human understanding, in this deep ignorance and obscurity, is to be skeptical, or at least cautious; and not to admit of any hypothesis, whatsoever; much less, of any which is supported by no appearance of probability...Hume
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  16. #15  
    Bullshit Intolerant PhDemon's Avatar
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    Nope, everything is made of chemicals and all chemicals are poisonous/dangerous for a given value of poisonous/dangerous... It's the dose that is important.

    The MSDS sheets for common things like salt, aspirin and bleach would scare anyone off from using them if they were of a nervous disposition!
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