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Thread: Are these right? if so, what is their difference meanings?

  1. #1 Are these right? if so, what is their difference meanings? 
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    I told the stylist I wanted my hair cut short
    I told the stylist I wanted my hair to be cut short
    I told the stylist I wanted that my hair be cut sh


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    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nima_persian View Post
    I told the stylist I wanted my hair cut short
    I told the stylist I wanted my hair to be cut short
    These are both correct with, as far as I can see, no significant difference in meaning. The second one might be considered slightly more formal (just because it is longer).

    You could have an optional "that": I told the stylist that I wanted ...
    This, again, just makes it slightly more formal. Occasionally, sentences can be ambiguous with it (I can't think of an example immediately) so, in writing, is usually better to include the "that", just in case.

    I told the stylist I wanted that my hair be cut sh
    This has been cut short.

    This is an example of the subjunctive, I think. It is rarely used in modern English and may sound a little "stilted" or too formal to many people.


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    Thank you so much.


    I told the stylist I wanted my hair cut short
    I told the stylist I wanted my hair to be cut short
    I told the stylist I wanted that my hair be cut short.


    However, at the moment, my BIG problem has to do with the followings:


    I told the stylist I wanted my hair cut short
    I told the stylist I wanted my hair to be cut short

    ARE those PASSIVES?

    What about HAIR CUT? -- I am wondering whether hair cut is a VERB?

    And, I can not UNDERSTAND such constructions:

    my hair cut short
    my hair to be cut short

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    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nima_persian View Post
    I told the stylist I wanted my hair cut short
    I told the stylist I wanted my hair to be cut short

    ARE those PASSIVES?
    The sentence isn't. But the final clause is. This document describes it as an "embedded passive": http://lel.ed.ac.uk/~gpullum/passive_loathing.pdf (page 5).

    More from the same author on passive constructions here (if you are interested): Language Log » The passive in English

    What about HAIR CUT? -- I am wondering whether hair cut is a VERB?
    No. (You can't say "to hair cut".)

    1. It can be analysed as a compound noun (hair+cut). In which case you might say things like: "That is a nice hair-cut." Or: "Are you going to get a new hair cut?"

    In this case, you can analyse the first example as an answer to the question, "What sort of hair-cut do you want?"; in this case, "short" is an adjective modifying hair-cut ("I want a short hair-cut" or "I want my hair-cut short"). Actually, I don't think that works in this case, so ...

    2. It can be analysed as a noun + verb, as in "Are you going to get your hair cut"; i.e. "hair" is the subject of the verb "cut".

    You can think of both sentences as an answer to the question: "How would you like your hair [to be] cut?"; in other words, "short" is an adverb modifying the verb "cut". ("I want it cut short.")

    It is tricky because it can be analysed two different ways. The second is probably more natural in this case.

    Hope that helps.
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    I told the stylist I wanted my hair cut short
    The sentence seems simple to someone who speaks English, but there is a lot going on that would make it hard for somebody learning English. There is the passive mood, the subjunctive, and the dependent clauses.
    Maybe it would help to break it down like this. We could use active mood and say: "The stylist cuts my hair." Then we can add the adverb, and say "The stylist cuts my hair short.'
    Then we could change from active to passive and say "My hair is cut short." Then we could change it to subjunctive and say "I want my hair to be cut short." This would signify that I am imagining a condition where my hair will be cut short. Then we could leave out the "to be" and say "I want my hair cut short." Then we can make that a dependent clause and say "I told the stylist I wanted my hair cut short" The original statement "I wanted my hair cut short" becomes a dependent, or subordinate, clause to "I told the stylist..."
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    Thank you all so much and get the whole Great lessons that you have just said.

    However, my another problem:

    You have said',Then we could change it to subjunctive and say "I want my hair to be cut short." This would signify that I am imagining a condition where my hair will be cut short. Then we could leave out the "to be" and say "I want my hair cut short.
    '



    As far as I know, when you want change it to SUBJUNCTIVE, you leave out TO BE, but you said another things !

    In addition, almost I know the rules of SUBJUNCTIVE. However,considering what Wikipedia and I say, we should leave OUT TO BE AND APOSTROPHE S:


    Source:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_subjunctive

    Notice that the subjunctive is not generally used after verbs such as hope and expect, or after verbs that use a different syntax, such as want (it is not usual to say *I want that he wash up; the typical syntax is I want him to wash up).
    Last edited by nima_persian; March 18th, 2014 at 01:42 AM.
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    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
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    I suspect very few people know what the subjunctive is in English! Many people use it interchangeably with "conditional". I don't think Harold's example is actually a subjunctive. I think it is just a non-finite dependent clause.
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