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Thread: School voucher in UK

  1. #1 School voucher in UK 
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    I try to study the attempt to implent the school voucher in UK, there are no information about that topic and I really need help.
    What do you know about that issue?


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  3. #2  
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    Quote Originally Posted by VJericho View Post
    I try to study the attempt to implent the school voucher in UK, there are no information about that topic and I really need help.
    What do you know about that issue?
    If you search the web for this you will find various pieces of commentary advocating it in the UK, usually from sources on the political right. But it has never been implemented, to my knowledge. I suspect that would be why you can't find anything about it.


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    Quote Originally Posted by VJericho View Post
    I try to study the attempt to implent the school voucher in UK, there are no information about that topic and I really need help.
    What do you know about that issue?
    Ok first off hello and welcome to the forum, now to school vouchers. School vouchers are given out by the government, it may also be the case that for example in the UK they might also be given out by LEA's (Local Education Authorities), they are designed to allow parents to place their children into private education whilst having either some or all the cost met by the government/LEA or some cases give extra funding to popular state schools to expand and take on more pupils. This would enable parents to have more choice over where their children are educated and bring in more competition to the education sector.

    There are however arguments against such a move though especially here in the UK, pretty much like the argument against free schools many campaigners feel this would take much needed investment and funding away from state schools again helping to push us further towards a two tear education system. The second real argument against is that it is contracting out the state education process by introducing a backdoor method of privatisation.

    This of course should not be confused with local or government vouchers aimed at funding pre-school education or childcare, or any assistance vouchers aimed at giving financial support to poorer pupils.

    Here's a link for a Telegraph article about one idea for school vouchers:

    Give parents voucher for school of their choice, ministers told - Telegraph
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    I'm just curious if vouchers are being argued for simply for better academic achievement, or as often the case in the US, as a proxy for the culture war by parents who want to deny their children secular education such as evolution or how to wear a condom.
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  6. #5  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox View Post
    I'm just curious if vouchers are being argued for simply for better academic achievement, or as often the case in the US, as a proxy for the culture war by parents who want to deny their children secular education such as evolution or how to wear a condom.
    This has been a real hot button issue here in Indy. We basically have parent arguing for vouchers to send their kids to better performing Catholic schools, while some of the public schools suffer more as they lose kids and, subsequently, their budget. I'm interested in hearing more in this thread.

    Our local radio discussion, if anyone is REALLY interested: No Limits - School Vouchers - July 25, 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox View Post
    I'm just curious if vouchers are being argued for simply for better academic achievement, or as often the case in the US, as a proxy for the culture war by parents who want to deny their children secular education such as evolution or how to wear a condom.
    I think what has been happening in the UK is that people have been looking abroad for ideas and seen the way school vouchers are being used elsewhere. There still seems to be some debate about how they could be used and who should get them, mainly though the arguments have been geared towards allowing parents greater choice over where their children are educated. The way local school places are allocated here has long been a bone of contention for many years, there has been considerable concern that the more well heeled parents were being able to buy up properties in the local catchment areas for the better state schools, thus denying places at these more desirable schools to the less well off parents.

    The debate about education placements has been raging for years and the introduction of the school league tables really took the debate to whole new level, we have seen now better off parents taking extraordinary steps to ensure their children get every possible advantage to the point now that many have gone as far as setting up 'free schools', they've clubbed together to start new schools which they believe can offer higher educational standards. Again though here there have been arguments about these free schools diverting resources from state schools and over the intake of students from poorer back grounds. Here again there is talk over brighter children from poorer back grounds that are denied places at either free schools or the better state schools being awarded a type of school voucher to fund them at private schools and also in some cases for either free or better state school to expand and take on more brighter students from poorer back grounds.

    The education of our children is obviously a major issue and at present it is unfair, and the debate about free schools, pupil premiums or indeed school vouchers isn't likely to go away anytime soon.

    But in answer to your question yes it is about better academic achievement, it's not really about ideological issues such as religion or secular education here, but it is about social issues such as equality & fairness as well as the quality of education children are actually being given and the actual exam results they are recieving.
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    I understand opinions pro school voucher but there are still something not clean. I know here in Spain, and I'm sure that isn't the only country where this happens, catholic and private school sometimes hide or change bad student ratings so they look as a good school. What I try to explain? (I know is difficult to understand how I write because I never practise my English writing) Some private school just don't accept students with bad ratings, imagine if everybody can enter in a private school with the school voucher, so many students, kids, that probably will never receive a good education because stereotypes, prejudgement or other reason. I think, and this is just my opinion and not the final of my short project so everybody can correct me, government should be interested in the education of their teachers and professors; government should invest in infrastructures of public schools and universities and don't give so much money in parents. Parents that sometimes just don't know how to educate their children, so the government should look to the future citizen.
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    Hey there, I certainly agree the with the fact that some private, now also free schools here, are very reluctant to take on students who they feel may affect the schools results. Sadly here this actually also happens in some of our state schools, even though it most definately not supposed to occur as school admissions for states schools are mandated on catchment areas, basically if you live close enough to a particular state school then it is require to offer your child a place, but what has happened is schools have turned away students who they believe are poor academically claiming a lack of places and then offering places to more gifted students living further away.

    This practice has been growing since the introduction of school league tables for state schools, whilst private and free schools have more autonomy over their admissions policies so they can actively ensure they only take higher achieving students. It's been a bone of contention in the whole free school debate because they are also required to allocate a certain number of their places under the same catchment system as the rest of the state schools, the point being that free schools can choose to have large catchment areas and are usually over subscribed they can then pick and choose which students they give places to.

    With regard to teachers & lecturers the UK has been flirting with the idea of removing the requirement to have a degree or teaching certificate, which given the constant debates around the standard of teaching is plumb crazy, imho, really can't see that helping teaching standards in any way. It's been said time and again, but some people just do not seem to understand this basic principle, that being good at particular subjects doesn't necessarily mean a person would be good at teaching them. If we want better standards in education then I think we need to be going in the other direction and actually start giving more and better training to the teachers before we unleash them on impressionable young minds.
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    Perhaps UK is just following the science that suggest most certification standards don't have very much to do with student performance while shutting off a potentially vast poll of excellent teachers that have actually worked in the fields they teach but haven't completed some check marks.

    Quite a few studies that bare this out. Studies of master's in teaching shows a similar low gains.
    http://www.dartmouth.edu/~dstaiger/P...rch%202006.pdf
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox View Post
    Perhaps UK is just following the science that suggest most certification standards don't have very much to do with student performance while shutting off a potentially vast poll of excellent teachers that have actually worked in the fields they teach but haven't completed some check marks.

    Quite a few studies that bare this out. Studies of master's in teaching shows a similar low gains.
    http://www.dartmouth.edu/~dstaiger/P...march 2006.pdf
    I must admit on this one Lynx my opinion is being coloured more by personal experience than specific evidence. My mother was trained and achieved her teaching certificate back in the 1950's. She learned all the correct ways to actually teach, she was a very good teacher by all accounts, she taught in many different establishments, children of all ages including in special schools for children with learning difficulties before finally moving into social work. She has always explained to me that with the best will in the world and all the latest fancy teaching methods doesn't necessarily make for a good teacher.

    I think really this has kind of stuck that their are specific ways of teaching, whilst some people might make good teachers certainly not all. So really I guess I just now think that all teachers should be trained, so as those who are capable can go and prove it get their certificate or degree etc.... and those who arn't cut out either improve and learn how to teach properly and gain their qualification or they fall by the wayside.

    But the point is I kind of think we need to be sure that our young people are getting taught by people we can all be sure can actually teach.
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