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Thread: Should I just go for a high demand science degree even if I'm not really interested?

  1. #1 Should I just go for a high demand science degree even if I'm not really interested? 
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    Since the job demand for some markets are so poor, would it be better to just get a degree in a field where the demand is high, even if I am not really that interested in it, for example engineering, as opposed to doing something I am really interested in but the job availablilty is simply lacking, for example in research science where the job outlook nor pay is really thriving?


    Last edited by tariqblaze; October 14th, 2013 at 12:27 PM.
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    That is too hard of a question. Everything there depends on you. You haven't provided enough information about yourself. Have to know your interests, and likes, things done in the past, what you want to do. It's sort of a school counciling area. Science and engineering .Technical jobs are utilities like a janitor. Medical jobs are accepted everywhere but are hard to learn. If you into the money theres banking. Some people make a fortune and have fun writing science fiction books. It all depends on you and what you want to do and like doing. Again technical utility jobs such as astrophysicists has guys that know so much math that they think a calculator is stupid.


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    I believe having an interest in something makes it a lot easier to learn about it, otherwise you may struggle to get a high enough qualification to have made the study worthwhile.

    Of course, I'm only speaking for myself so you may not have that problem with motivation.
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    If you're interested in research, go for it. I'm not exactly sure where you got the idea that job availability is lacking. Of course, I'm not really sure which "science" you're referring to, but according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the job outlook of medical scientists is supposed to grow ~36%, physicists/astronomers 14%, etc. I guess it depends on what you're interested in, but I would definitely recommend studying something you're interested in while finding a happy medium with job availability/pay.
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    Hey,

    You could consider taking a career placement test. But generally its not a good idea to pursue something you don't have an interest in.

    What are you interested in?
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    If you acquire a qualification in something you don't really have an interest in it means you will be working at least 40 hours a week, 45 or more weeks a year, for forty years or more at a job you don't like. Does that sound like a smart move to you?

    Edit: by the way, that's over 72,000 hours of tedium.
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    Do what you like. And don't get fixated on the economy...while there are trouble areas, this recession and unemployment is mostly about unskilled labor. Many of the sciences are so short they'll even pay your way through grad school, help get you a solid apprenticeship and a strong launch into a career with journal publications before you graduate.

    The last tidbit is science is amazing and fun at times but also involves a lot of tedious drudgery measuring, documenting, cataloging and archiving everything needed to eek out that bit of evidence to support or trash a hypothesis. If you don't think you can learn to love your science...(even taking it the bounds of obsession on occasion--you'd completely understand if you got me around a MidWest plains thunderstorm!), than it's probably not for you.
    Last edited by Lynx_Fox; October 14th, 2013 at 04:12 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by sapien View Post
    That is too hard of a question. Everything there depends on you. You haven't provided enough information about yourself. Have to know your interests, and likes, things done in the past, what you want to do. It's sort of a school counciling area. Science and engineering .Technical jobs are utilities like a janitor. Medical jobs are accepted everywhere but are hard to learn. If you into the money theres banking. Some people make a fortune and have fun writing science fiction books. It all depends on you and what you want to do and like doing. Again technical utility jobs such as astrophysicists has guys that know so much math that they think a calculator is stupid.
    What I mean is I dont want to do something outside of the science field. I want to do something science related and definitely do not want to do something just for the money like banking.

    If it were my choice, i would go for a research science position. It doesnt really matter what kind of research it is in, chemistry, biology, physics, as long as it is science. Applied science, technical science, and engineering science occupations arent really my cup of tea. I dont seek to be on the hands-on side of science, I rather the studies which inspire the technicians. But because research science fields are lacking so much these days in federal funding and job opportunity, I wonder whether that is a wise tree to climb up. All the jobs are being given to the ones who actually apply the science in some front.

    Like I said I dont mind taking a job in any of the applied sciences but basic research science would be my first choice and has always been my first love. I still have a great love for applied sciences of any kind because it still is a form of basic science, however I dont know if I would ever be truly happy doing something that isnt my lifelong dream.

    Even still if I get a degree in applied science, I can always come back to basic science. Plus with the opportunities and income increase with my secondary job, it would make going back even easier (or harder depending on how deep I get).

    If I wanted to write comic books, I wouldnt need to get a degree for that. That is just something you do stemming from your hobbies. As far as the medical field, yes it is in demand but medicine is a little further out of my range.

    The two fields have to decide on are two fields that I can definitely see myself doing but one field just more so than the other. One field I am completely passionate about and have plans for while the other maybe at a 25% decrease.

    I know if I stick to my passion, job demand and income wouldnt be an issue. But I have heard so many horror stories from scientist who were still so passionate about their work, had genius plans to make it work, and still are struggling.

    SO when I ask the question should I juist go with the higher demanding job with a better salary but less of a passion, I dont mean a job which is totally out of my original passion. Something very close to my complete passion but just not exactly. Not something completely outside of the range like writing comic books or turning a hobby into a career because that is something that can be done with or without a degree or a career merely in ones spare time.
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    High demand - High pay (Money): External motivator
    Doing something you like: Internal motivator

    If you can find a job with both, you have truly succeeded in life.
    A lie is a lie even if everyone believes it. The truth is the truth even if nobody believes it. - David Stevens
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    Tariq,

    I don't mean to deter you away from anything here because I only want to help paint a realistic picture for you, but research positions are very sough-after. Many if not all, require you to have at the very least a masters degree. And in order to get into a masters program you must have a good if not very good GPA depending on what field its for. I was involved in undergrad research which is a great step to take to increase your chances of getting into a graduate level program.

    My point is that it is very competitive out there and in my humble opinion, the only way to obtain a research position is through hard work and passion.

    I'm curious, what grade are you right now? Are you in highschool?

    If I were you I'd start by taking a career placement test. It's just a question and answer sheet that helps you to understand what you might like to do. If you have good grades in physics, chemistry, or biology then that is also a good indicator of what you might like to study in college.


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    Quote Originally Posted by mat5592 View Post
    If you're interested in research, go for it. I'm not exactly sure where you got the idea that job availability is lacking. Of course, I'm not really sure which "science" you're referring to, but according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the job outlook of medical scientists is supposed to grow ~36%, physicists/astronomers 14%, etc. I guess it depends on what you're interested in, but I would definitely recommend studying something you're interested in while finding a happy medium with job availability/pay.
    Thats the thing. Im not really interested in the medical aspect of science. But that is the sector that has a good demand. Physics as well is not really my line. The field I want to go into in the science field has a low demand. Biology. Chemistry as well but some chemist actually are thriving. There is a possibility that I find a career in another field that is very similar but I haven't found one. If so that is possible.

    For now, the jobs that are most in demand in the science field are sub-fields I am not completely interested in or do not have plans for pursuing first. Physics, astrophysics, biomedical, biochemistry. All fields that make good money and have decent demand but are also jobs that I do not see myself being completely emphatic about. I know what I want to do and what I want to do is scarce. I want biology not biochemistry but biology isnt in demand and biochemistry is. And yes both are very related but at the same time there are vast differences between both so it isnt like just pick one since they are basically the same. They arent.

    My problem is go for your love but face the difficulties, or go for your second love and reap the ease of luxury, but always wonder what if I chose "the one". What would I have become? It is that that really eats me.
    Last edited by tariqblaze; October 14th, 2013 at 05:48 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eighty88 View Post
    Tariq,

    I don't mean to deter you away from anything here because I only want to help paint a realistic picture for you, but research positions are very sough-after. Many if not all, require you to have at the very least a masters degree. And in order to get into a masters program you must have a good if not very good GPA depending on what field its for. I was involved in undergrad research which is a great step to take to increase your chances of getting into a graduate level program.

    My point is that it is very competitive out there and in my humble opinion, the only way to obtain a research position is through hard work and passion.

    I'm curious, what grade are you right now? Are you in highschool?

    If I were you I'd start by taking a career placement test. It's just a question and answer sheet that helps you to understand what you might like to do. If you have good grades in physics, chemistry, or biology then that is also a good indicator of what you might like to study in college.


    Cheers!
    I dont want to be in school after my bachelors degree. I do not have the money for a masters degree but if I can get a grant or scholarship, that would be a different story. I have enough for a bachelors and that is it.

    With a bachelors, not much is available. You will need a masters to do anything of value really. And even with a masters, it varies from job to job. Which means I will have to look for jobs that are in demand with a bachelors degree if I seek to make a living or suffer the "college syndrome" of which college kids graduate but find no work and end up working at Mc'donalds because they didnt get a degree with high job availability.

    Getting a bachelors in an engineering field is almost as good as getting a masters in a research science field. Possibly better. With my limited resources since loans are out of the question, I have to be realistic about my future. The love of my life may not be obtainable. I may actually have to end up settling for a rebound.
    Last edited by tariqblaze; October 14th, 2013 at 05:49 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by tariqblaze View Post
    I dont want to be in school after my bachelors degree. I do not have the money for a masters degree and if I can get a grant or scholarship, that would be a different story. I have enough for a bachelors and that is it.

    Witha bachelors, not much is available. You will need a masters to do anything of value really. And even with a masters, it varies from job to job. Which means I will have to look for jobs that are in demand with a bachelors degree if I seek to make a living or suffer the "college syndrome" of which college kids graduate but find no work and end up working at Mc'donalds because they didnt get a degree with high job availability.

    Getting a bachelors in an engineering field is almost as good as getting a masters in a research science field. Possibly better. With my limited resources since loans are out of the question, I have to be realistic about my future. The love of my life may not be obtainable. I may actually have to end up settling for a rebound.
    You might be surprised how many options you have!

    Depending on your field of study, many graduate programs are paid-for and you get paid to conduct research. You could very well do grad-studies depending on your situation. And I meant to ask you this before, but have you looked into any scholarships yet? You should look up and apply for every and any scholarship you can! You would be amazed at how many are out there! My friend is looks like a typical Norwegian, he's tall, blonde hair, blue eyes, the works. But it turns out he has native American ancestry and now he goes to a top university for free, with extra change to spare!

    Engineering is always a great option. There are more than enough jobs available unless you go more technical like aeronautical or nuclear. Just remember it's a lot of math and physics!

    Be sure to look into grants, scholarships, and depending on your situation, loans.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eighty88 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by tariqblaze View Post
    I dont want to be in school after my bachelors degree. I do not have the money for a masters degree and if I can get a grant or scholarship, that would be a different story. I have enough for a bachelors and that is it.

    Witha bachelors, not much is available. You will need a masters to do anything of value really. And even with a masters, it varies from job to job. Which means I will have to look for jobs that are in demand with a bachelors degree if I seek to make a living or suffer the "college syndrome" of which college kids graduate but find no work and end up working at Mc'donalds because they didnt get a degree with high job availability.

    Getting a bachelors in an engineering field is almost as good as getting a masters in a research science field. Possibly better. With my limited resources since loans are out of the question, I have to be realistic about my future. The love of my life may not be obtainable. I may actually have to end up settling for a rebound.
    You might be surprised how many options you have!

    Depending on your field of study, many graduate programs are paid-for and you get paid to conduct research. You could very well do grad-studies depending on your situation. And I meant to ask you this before, but have you looked into any scholarships yet? You should look up and apply for every and any scholarship you can! You would be amazed at how many are out there! My friend is looks like a typical Norwegian, he's tall, blonde hair, blue eyes, the works. But it turns out he has native American ancestry and now he goes to a top university for free, with extra change to spare!

    Engineering is always a great option. There are more than enough jobs available unless you go more technical like aeronautical or nuclear. Just remember it's a lot of math and physics!

    Be sure to look into grants, scholarships, and depending on your situation, loans.
    Thank you for the advice. Engineering sounds great but it is not my first choice. Im more the thinker type than the hands-on type. I rather research rather than innovate.

    I have been looking into schlorships and grants but I have been finding difficulty obtaining one. I will admit I havent searched as hard as I should be searching. It is possible that I just havent found the right one that is out there yet and need to keep applying.

    If I can get assistance for my masters, that would be perfect. But if this is actually not possible, I have to be realistic about my options and prepare for the worst. That is why I am making preparations for getting a bachelors degree that which if all else fails, I can still fall back on with a decent paying career even without a masters.

    Engineering, biochemistry, biomedical, astrophysics. All of these are careers that pay well, have high job availability and all are possible and likely with only an entry level bachelors. I just have to decide whether to choose a good paying entry level career with a bachelors, or risk it all with hopes of getting grants for a masters and end up with no job because of job scarcity with a bachelors in another lower paying field. Very tough decision.
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    Quote Originally Posted by tariqblaze View Post
    Thank you for the advice. Engineering sounds great but it is not my first choice. Im more the thinker type than the hands-on type. I rather research rather than innovate.

    I have been looking into schlorships and grants but I have been finding difficulty obtaining one. I will admit I havent searched as hard as I should be searching. It is possible that I just havent found the right one that is out there yet and need to keep applying.

    If I can get assistance for my masters, that would be perfect. But if this is actually not possible, I have to be realistic about my options and prepare for the worst. That is why I am making preparations for getting a bachelors degree that which if all else fails, I can still fall back on with a decent paying career even without a masters.

    Engineering, biochemistry, biomedical, astrophysics. All of these are careers that pay well, have high job availability and all are possible and likely with only an entry level bachelors. I just have to decide whether to choose a good paying entry level career with a bachelors, or risk it all with hopes of getting grants for a masters and end up with no job because of job scarcity with a bachelors in another lower paying field. Very tough decision.
    Keep in mind that there are many different fields of engineering (petroleum, electrical, mechanical, civil, computer, industrial, health and safety, etc), and even more subcategories of specialties. For example, if you're not wanting to be out in the field doing engineering work then you might consider working with design.

    I wouldn't worry about it too much, many students change their major within their first two years. That's about the time you find out what you want and what you've got.

    Good luck!
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    It seems to me Biology and assocated has to be one of the best fields. Back in ancient history, there was a substance.And it was a very very cool substance. But it could't remember how it got there. It needed rna. It advanced to dna. It was in water. It wanted to check out dry land ,so it brought its natural enviroment with it. And this little ameoba creature eveoved into plants trees dinasours birds mammals. It walked on two legs. It developed civilization. Next it needed more money, possably in the field of biology. Nessity might be the mother of invention.
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  18. #17  
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    Quote Originally Posted by sapien View Post
    It seems to me Biology and assocated has to be one of the best fields. Back in ancient history, there was a substance.And it was a very very cool substance. But it could't remember how it got there. It needed rna. It advanced to dna. It was in water. It wanted to check out dry land ,so it brought its natural enviroment with it. And this little ameoba creature eveoved into plants trees dinasours birds mammals. It walked on two legs. It developed civilization. Next it needed more money, possably in the field of biology. Nessity might be the mother of invention.
    Cool thoughts. Any advice on my situation at hand though?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eighty88 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by tariqblaze View Post
    Thank you for the advice. Engineering sounds great but it is not my first choice. Im more the thinker type than the hands-on type. I rather research rather than innovate.

    I have been looking into schlorships and grants but I have been finding difficulty obtaining one. I will admit I havent searched as hard as I should be searching. It is possible that I just havent found the right one that is out there yet and need to keep applying.

    If I can get assistance for my masters, that would be perfect. But if this is actually not possible, I have to be realistic about my options and prepare for the worst. That is why I am making preparations for getting a bachelors degree that which if all else fails, I can still fall back on with a decent paying career even without a masters.

    Engineering, biochemistry, biomedical, astrophysics. All of these are careers that pay well, have high job availability and all are possible and likely with only an entry level bachelors. I just have to decide whether to choose a good paying entry level career with a bachelors, or risk it all with hopes of getting grants for a masters and end up with no job because of job scarcity with a bachelors in another lower paying field. Very tough decision.
    Keep in mind that there are many different fields of engineering (petroleum, electrical, mechanical, civil, computer, industrial, health and safety, etc), and even more subcategories of specialties. For example, if you're not wanting to be out in the field doing engineering work then you might consider working with design.

    I wouldn't worry about it too much, many students change their major within their first two years. That's about the time you find out what you want and what you've got.

    Good luck!
    I am already in my junior year and I havent decided to change majors yet. I am however at the crossroads for whether I should. I know I do not want to work in engineering. I dont want to design innovations nor create innovations but I would be more than happy to learn and research the knowledge it takes to design and create innovations. I love learning. Learning more so than doing. Not to say I could never be an innovator or do anything in applied sciences because eventually everything overlaps. But as my basis, I want to start small. If the opportunity presents itself in the future and I can do more and innovate, Im all for it. I just have to establish a base first. That is my concern. Where will my base be established, Engineering (money demand) or science (love passion, but lack of job security). Still I have to decide very soon what it will be.
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    You are still in the information gathering stage. Exaust all avaiiable resources.
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  21. #20  
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    Quote Originally Posted by tariqblaze View Post
    I am already in my junior year and I havent decided to change majors yet. I am however at the crossroads for whether I should. I know I do not want to work in engineering. I dont want to design innovations nor create innovations but I would be more than happy to learn and research the knowledge it takes to design and create innovations. I love learning. Learning more so than doing. Not to say I could never be an innovator or do anything in applied sciences because eventually everything overlaps. But as my basis, I want to start small. If the opportunity presents itself in the future and I can do more and innovate, Im all for it. I just have to establish a base first. That is my concern. Where will my base be established, Engineering (money demand) or science (love passion, but lack of job security). Still I have to decide very soon what it will be.
    You're a junior in college? You have access to some great minds, you should speak with your adviser. You pay them for their service so use it!
    I'm not sure what field researches knowledge, I've never heard of it.

    You may want to consider business management. You don't have to take high-science or math classes like an engineer and you may very likely end up their boss.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Eighty88 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by tariqblaze View Post
    I am already in my junior year and I havent decided to change majors yet. I am however at the crossroads for whether I should. I know I do not want to work in engineering. I dont want to design innovations nor create innovations but I would be more than happy to learn and research the knowledge it takes to design and create innovations. I love learning. Learning more so than doing. Not to say I could never be an innovator or do anything in applied sciences because eventually everything overlaps. But as my basis, I want to start small. If the opportunity presents itself in the future and I can do more and innovate, Im all for it. I just have to establish a base first. That is my concern. Where will my base be established, Engineering (money demand) or science (love passion, but lack of job security). Still I have to decide very soon what it will be.
    You're a junior in college? You have access to some great minds, you should speak with your adviser. You pay them for their service so use it!
    I'm not sure what field researches knowledge, I've never heard of it.

    You may want to consider business management. You don't have to take high-science or math classes like an engineer and you may very likely end up their boss.


    Cheers!
    A research scientist researches knowledge. Science is knowledge and that is what a research scientist does. Research science is different from applied science. It is more gathering data, facts, knowledge, rather than creating, devolving, designing, engineering.

    I have gone to advisers in the past. Allot of them dont help as well as they could. I guess I could try different advisers. I did want to talk to some scientist who have actual experience and knowledge rather than an adviser who doesn't really know what they are talking about but just get paid to talk.

    I am also looking for some scientist to intern with or job shadow. Some respected individuals I can learn from but that is also a little harder done than said. Starting this thread on this forum was worth a shot though. You never know who may reply. You gave some valuable information so at least it wasnt for nothing.

    I guess now the most I can do is continue to seek answers wherever I can find them. Thanks again for your help.
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