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Thread: How Much Education And What For....Astronomer,AstroPhysics

  1. #1 How Much Education And What For....Astronomer,AstroPhysics 
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    I'm just about 15 now and I've really gotten into astronomy and astrophysics but haven't learned a whole lot yet... At this point in time i'm planning to become an Astronomer or an Astro Physician... How much school? And whats a good website to learn more about either?


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  3. #2  
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    Stuff the astrophysics for a while, go for mathematics physics and chemistry, if you can nail those three really well, you can teach yourself the rest with no problems at all, they are the building blocks, AP is the icing on the top. And of the three I mention, Maths is the top one to concentrate on. - good luck.


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    Forum Ph.D. william's Avatar
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    Hi Unseen,
    Here are a couple websites with info:
    http://www.aip.org/statistics/
    http://www.phys-astro.sonoma.edu/advisor/Jobs.html

    Typically a Ph.D. is required and I'll add that grad school is free (and almost always, one gets paid actually).

    In the real world, there is not much difference between an astronomer and an astrophysicist. Their work is virtually identical, although... I guess a nuclear astrophysicist's work is quite different from that of an astronomer's. Typically, I guess the term astronomer might apply to observational work, while astrophysicist might apply to theoretical and experimental (such as the nuclear astrophysicist - who does their work in the lab). In some departments, there might be a slight difference in course work between the two, but in other departments, there is no difference. In fact, I had to take the same classes (with the exception of a couple electives) as all the other physics disciplines such as atomic, condensed matter, nuclear, high energy, and of course, astro.

    I agree with Mega, for now, you need to lay the ground work, especially math.

    Cheers,
    william
    "... the polhode rolls without slipping on the herpolhode lying in the invariable plane."
    ~Footnote in Goldstein's Mechanics, 3rd ed. p. 202
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  5. #4  
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    hi,
    I'm 15 and I want to be an astronomer too. I live in Croatia and it is very difficult to find a job in astronomy here.
    Thank you for these links.
    Greetings from Croatia
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