Notices
Results 1 to 27 of 27

Thread: uni is so much harder than school!!

  1. #1 uni is so much harder than school!! 
    Forum Sophomore somfooleishfool's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    196
    So Iv just started my second week at uni and its proving to be a real challenge. Not so much the difficulty of content, that couldn't be simpler, but the style of learning is ridiculous. I don't understand how people are to learn in this environment, much less people like me with learning disabilities.

    I take in next to nothing in lectures, its like the teacher is talking at a brick wall until I get the fundamentals of what the teacher is talking about. So the only thing I learn in lectures is what it is I should learn. So I go away and study at home or at uni but if you get stuck you cant do anything about it, you cant ask the teacher questions during the lecture because that holds up the entire class. you cant ask the teacher questions after a lecture because there is always a line of students ready to ask the teacher something and already there is students piling into the room for the next lecture.

    Asking class members is only so effective as you can never be sure they know what they're talking about. So realistically the only reliable source of learning you have at uni is taking home notes on what content you need to learn, and search it up on the internet.

    I have to have written a summary of an article by friday for an assignment and I havn't a clue how to write one. I had an attempt at summarising a different article than the assignment one and handed it to the teacher but apparently I didn't follow the steps properly even though I thought I had, so I walk away with no more of an idea on how to do it than I arrived.

    I wish I paid more attention in school. SO much better learning environment.

    how did you guys get through uni? do you find the teachers and disrupt there day to day work to ask a question? do you trust your peers are doing it right and run the risk of learning incorrect information? or do you teach yourself on the internet? even that runs the risk of being wrong for what the teacher is asking for.

    It also annoys me seeing how easy it is for people without learning dysabilities, much of the things I get stuck on seem to be common sence to them and alot of the time they don't even bother studying things because they learnt it in the lecture whereas I went home and spent my night or my weekend trying to figure it out.

    Im not severely disabilitied relative to many others (as far as I can see), but not only is this unfair on those with issues like mine, it's just plain unfair. Why should I be deny'd my dream of being a research scientist because of a cruddy learning environment.

    Rant over, back to study.


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    14,168
    In school it is the responsibility of the teachers to teach.
    In university it is the responsibility of the students to learn.

    The difference is based upon the anticipated maturity of the university student.


    In your references to where you could check on the validity of what you were being taught you made no mention of textbooks. Why was that? You made no mention of research papers. Why was that? Those are two vital sources you should be making maximum use of. At first the textbooks should dominate, but the role of research papers in your learning should steadily increase.

    Are you taking detailed notes? Are you writing things in your own words, not those of the lecturer - that's far the better way. Ask your classmates what they understood about a point, but don't assume it is a correct understanding. However, it gives you some additional chance to think about the topic. Then read your notes. Expand or correct them. Dip into the textbook. Read a research paper related to the topic.

    Approach the lecturer away from the lecture hall. Explain your learning diabilityand ask if you can get clarification from him on specific points.


    It's not a cruddy learning environment, as you seem to think. It's a cruddy teaching environment - it's a great learning environment once you figure it out.


    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Forum Sophomore somfooleishfool's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    196
    Quote Originally Posted by Ophiolite
    In school it is the responsibility of the teachers to teach.
    In university it is the responsibility of the students to learn.

    The difference is based upon the anticipated maturity of the university student.


    In your references to where you could check on the validity of what you were being taught you made no mention of textbooks. Why was that? You made no mention of research papers. Why was that? Those are two vital sources you should be making maximum use of. At first the textbooks should dominate, but the role of research papers in your learning should steadily increase.

    Are you taking detailed notes? Are you writing things in your own words, not those of the lecturer - that's far the better way. Ask your classmates what they understood about a point, but don't assume it is a correct understanding. However, it gives you some additional chance to think about the topic. Then read your notes. Expand or correct them. Dip into the textbook. Read a research paper related to the topic.

    Approach the lecturer away from the lecture hall. Explain your learning diabilityand ask if you can get clarification from him on specific points.


    It's not a cruddy learning environment, as you seem to think. It's a cruddy teaching environment - it's a great learning environment once you figure it out.
    Wow, thank you.

    textbooks were simply overlooked in my rant. I have been using primarily my textsbooks to learn from. research papers Im finding rather hard to puzzle out, I find them more usefull for finding out what ur stumped on rather than helping you learn anything.

    my writing is all but illegable. I have honestly seen 5 yr olds write better than me.... well... that would be assuming I can write. I can't write. I print. and besides the point I find it neigh impossible to A: pick key points from what the lecturer is saying. B: listen to the lecturer whilst note taking. C: im too busy focusing on writing to have concious thought as to what im writing. im litterally like a robot when i copy things down. but dysability support has said they might be able to give me copys of notes so thats excellent.

    im not as much of an idiot as it may be sounding, make a list of anyones flaws and leave out there merits and anyone will sound like an idiot

    I dont have much to comment on the rest of what you have said but its all taken on board and i much appreciate your post.

    P.s iv found it takes me about as much time (or longer) to spell check my posts. My grammar and spelling skills are just fine but im just hopeless at applying it while i get my ideas down. so my question is this. do people really care about a missed apostraphe, a few missing coma's and maybe a few capitol letters on thescienceforum? i will not spell check my above post and see how you find it to read and if it annoys you
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    14,168
    It is unfortunate that you find it difficult to extract the key points from what the lecturer is saying. This is a very useful skill. However, I think it is one that you can develop with practice. Here are some suggestions:

    1. If you are able to get copies of notes for the lectures still plan on making key summaries. Listen to what is being said. think about it and try to write down a phrase or a couple of key words that capture the heart of what is being discussed.
    2. Stop trying to take linear notes. Build up a mind map as you go. (Here is an example of a mind map.)
    3. Before the lecture begins, on the basis of its title and proposed subject matter write down half a dozen major points you think will be made, or six questions you hope will be answered during the lecture.
    4. At the end of the lecture get somewhere quiet, very quickly and write down what you now believe to be the central points. Note any uncertainties you have. Discuss those with classmates, or check your textbook, etc.


    You asked if your unchecked writing was annoying. I have to say, for me, it was. The occassional mistake is acceptable, but when they mount up it becomes a distraction. Marshal Mcluhan said The Medium is the Message. He was probably right.

    That said, I was amused to note that the most glaring error in my own post was "learning diabilityand ".

    Edit: Another possibility - I almost never looked at my notes from lectures, but I took extremely detailed ones. I found the act of putting the concepts into my own words and committing them to paper gave me good retention of those concepts.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard i_feel_tiredsleepy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Montreal
    Posts
    2,256
    Does your school have note taking clubs, when I did my undergrad the student association used to pay good note takers to share theirs with the class. I never used them, but some find them very useful. Also, depending on your lecturers policy, you might consider audio recordings of the lecture so that you can check back on what the lecturer actually said if you are uncertain of some point.

    You should work on being more assertive, if there's a line of students at the lecturer at the end of class, get to the front of the line, or near it, when you can. Also, a lecturer or her assistants will usually have office hours set aside for students.

    Tutorials and study groups can also be helpful if they are available. I went to a university with a fairly large student body, so there were understandably a lot of services that a smaller school might not be able to sustain.
    "I almost went to bed
    without remembering
    the four white violets
    I put in the button-hole
    of your green sweater

    and how i kissed you then
    and you kissed me
    shy as though I'd
    never been your lover "
    - Leonard Cohen
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Forum Professor jrmonroe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    1,444
    Wow, my experience exactly in some of my university classes. What are the key points or fundamental ideas? I think I know what you mean ... at least in school, a teacher would write the key points and subpoints on blackboards and then orally fill in the details. Even now in business meetings, I have some problems dividing a oral presentation into points and subpoints. Some people drone on, and I can't tell where one point ends and the next one begins.

    Profs
    Profs should have a syllabus, although they're sometimes not much help. Perhaps the best approach would be to go to the prof in his office or by email, and ask how to overcome this problem. Some profs are willing to give some out-of-classroom attention to earnest students. Seriously, schools should require taking a course on how to listen and take notes.

    TA's
    I went to a small, private college with only classrooms. But, if your profs teach to hundreds of students in lecture halls, aren't there TA's (Teaching Assistants) to go to? They're upperclassmen who have been through the course in question. If there's no official TA's, maybe you could find upperclassmen willing to help you.

    Notes
    One personal warning: don't stop taking notes so you can focus entirely on what the prof is teaching. I thought I was dividing my attention between listening and writing, and that my writing was interfering with my listening. Well, I can tell you that it did not work for me.
    Grief is the price we pay for love. (CM Parkes) Our postillion has been struck by lightning. (Unknown) War is always the choice of the chosen who will not have to fight. (Bono) The years tell much what the days never knew. (RW Emerson) Reality is not always probable, or likely. (JL Borges)
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7  
    Forum Sophomore somfooleishfool's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    196
    Thanks a bunch everyone for the tips. I'm surprised at the reaction I got here, I was bracing myself for a bit of abuse as is usually the case when you complain about your difficulties to anyone.
    Most people in my experience say things along the lines of "practise your writing more" or "pay more attention" or "study harder" noone is ever willing to accept that sometimes its really just not that simple and that sometimes trying to learn something can be like trying to press a coin through a brick wall.

    ^ Grammatically corrected and spell checked for your reading pleasure

    Edit: why isn't my avatar showing? I put up a picture of myself (after failing to think of anything clever to put there instead)
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #8  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard i_feel_tiredsleepy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Montreal
    Posts
    2,256
    Check your profile to see if the photo uploaded properly.
    "I almost went to bed
    without remembering
    the four white violets
    I put in the button-hole
    of your green sweater

    and how i kissed you then
    and you kissed me
    shy as though I'd
    never been your lover "
    - Leonard Cohen
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #9  
    Veracity Vigilante inow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    3,499
    You might also consider recording the lectures. That way, once you've spent more personal time exploring the topic and learning the foundational stuff, you can return to the lecture and listen again with a better grasp. I would generally spend the week doing the homework, reviewing my notes, and figuring out the idea, and would then listen to the lecture recordings at the end of the week or on the weekend. This helped me pick up information that I missed the first time (because the first time it was ALL new to me, so the second time I was able to reinforce the right things and fill in gaps).

    Also, try to get to class early and get a seat up front. This helps to hear the lecture better without distractions of watching people around you. Also, it gives you a better chance to get to the instructor after class and be at the front of the line for your questions.

    Always go to office hours, with the professor and the TA... even if you don't think you need it. Go in and just validate your understanding. Say, "Here's what I heard in the lecture, and I think this is how it works. Is that accurate? Did I miss anything?" The more you do this, the more complete your knowledge will be. Also, you'll have a much better chance of determining what points are important to the instructors and which points you can spend less time on.

    Join a study group when possible, or just get a group of friends to do the homework together. Usually, you have a chance to see what someone else understood from the lecture, and to hear the ideas in a new way. It also gives you the chance to answer their questions when you understood something they didn't. This helps both your confidence in the material, and also your understanding (when you can explain a concept to someone else, it generally helps you to understand it better as well).

    Don't ever let yourself get behind. It's better to be 2 or 3 days in front of the homework instead of 2 or 3 days late. Good luck, and have fun.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  11. #10  
    Forum Sophomore somfooleishfool's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    196
    Quote Originally Posted by inow
    You might also consider recording the lectures. That way, once you've spent more personal time exploring the topic and learning the foundational stuff, you can return to the lecture and listen again with a better grasp. I would generally spend the week doing the homework, reviewing my notes, and figuring out the idea, and would then listen to the lecture recordings at the end of the week or on the weekend. This helped me pick up information that I missed the first time (because the first time it was ALL new to me, so the second time I was able to reinforce the right things and fill in gaps).

    Also, try to get to class early and get a seat up front. This helps to hear the lecture better without distractions of watching people around you. Also, it gives you a better chance to get to the instructor after class and be at the front of the line for your questions.

    Always go to office hours, with the professor and the TA... even if you don't think you need it. Go in and just validate your understanding. Say, "Here's what I heard in the lecture, and I think this is how it works. Is that accurate? Did I miss anything?" The more you do this, the more complete your knowledge will be. Also, you'll have a much better chance of determining what points are important to the instructors and which points you can spend less time on.

    Join a study group when possible, or just get a group of friends to do the homework together. Usually, you have a chance to see what someone else understood from the lecture, and to hear the ideas in a new way. It also gives you the chance to answer their questions when you understood something they didn't. This helps both your confidence in the material, and also your understanding (when you can explain a concept to someone else, it generally helps you to understand it better as well).

    Don't ever let yourself get behind. It's better to be 2 or 3 days in front of the homework instead of 2 or 3 days late. Good luck, and have fun.
    Yeah I ought to start recording the lectures. That would be beneficial.

    I'm struggling to find the time to socialize with people in order to make friends with which to study with. During the lecture everyone is listening and you don't talk. then after class everyone dissipates off home or wherever very fast. The only way I managed so far was standing up just after the lecterer finished (only a class of about 15) and raising my voice to the entire class asking if anyone wants to go study. It worked but it was embarressing when some b17ch responded with "depends why you want to" implying I was being a sleeze secretly only addressing the girls in the class. But then about a minuite later a guy walked up and offered to study and I made a friend
    Reply With Quote  
     

  12. #11  
    Veracity Vigilante inow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    3,499
    Quote Originally Posted by somfooleishfool
    it was embarressing when some b17ch responded with "depends why you want to" implying I was being a sleeze secretly only addressing the girls in the class.
    That, or she thought you were do-able and she wanted to hook-up... Maybe she had no interest in studying, just doing the nasty with you.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  13. #12  
    Forum Sophomore somfooleishfool's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    196
    Quote Originally Posted by inow
    Quote Originally Posted by somfooleishfool
    it was embarressing when some b17ch responded with "depends why you want to" implying I was being a sleeze secretly only addressing the girls in the class.
    That, or she thought you were do-able and she wanted to hook-up... Maybe she had no interest in studying, just doing the nasty with you.
    Hahaha a possible scenario. Omg I was only just on top of uni then I get given a whole lot more to do. Its luckey Im souper smart -_-
    Reply With Quote  
     

  14. #13  
    Forum Freshman Cheesepole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Adelaide, Australia
    Posts
    31
    I suppose it depends on your experience in high school.

    I am currently in year 12 at a public, pretty crappy school. I have a few friends who are at University, who went to expensive, private and supposedly "better" high schools.

    From what I have seen, University is simply more independent. My friends, who studied in a much stricter environment, with teachers breathing down their neck, seem to be struggling with the idea that their study is now independently driven.

    I, on the other hand, am studying in an environment where I either do my work or I don't; if I don't do an assignment, it's my own fault. It's up to me to ask my teacher questions and submit assignments on time. I am ridiculously thankful for this, as I feel that it has set me up for University's somewhat "colder" atmosphere.

    I suppose that it also depends on your motivation. I know people who are incredibly intelligent, but lack the motivation and thus do not excel. However, you appear to be very motivated, as you mentioned your dream of becoming a research scientist. This is an advantage, so use it! If you ever get frustrated or upset, just picture the end goal. I also want to become a research scientist, and whenever I get stuck on something in Chemistry, I just remember why I'm doing it.

    I sympathise deeply with your situation; it is a very difficult transition. However, I'm sure that you will be fine, as long as you stick to your goals.

    Good luck!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  15. #14  
    Forum Masters Degree
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    703
    ME: Textbook 100% + going to class; to know the important points. Classes is only good for knowing the facts, and you can't use classes to understand new stuff; because understanding stuff takes alot of time and there's no pause button (I hope there is: like youtube) for a lecturer to speak. -For example: at undegrad it took me hours to understand a single page of physic, but imagine doing this in class! (you can't do it)

    I also have a learning disability too. I didn't know what it was but since my childhood my mother didn't let me do extra classes (like other kids) because I'm too slow, but that's a blessing because now I understand what "intelligence" really was! -Intelligence is the speed you figure things out (like puzzle or problem solving), so given time: even an average can became genius.

    So my point is: you don't try to understand stuff in class, you do it before class.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  16. #15  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard spuriousmonkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    2,191
    I found university a lot easier than "pre-university" education.

    Mostly because I was motivated to study at the university, while I wasn't before. Also the learning curve isn't very steep at university.

    Actually, modern university education is aimed at a level that is quite low. It's really isn't the elite education any more. If it is difficult I would try to change my ways and wonder whether you picked the right topic.
    "Kill them all and let God sort them out."

    - Arnaud Amalric

    http://spuriousforums.com/index.php
    Reply With Quote  
     

  17. #16  
    Forum Freshman Cheesepole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Adelaide, Australia
    Posts
    31
    Quote Originally Posted by msafwan View Post
    ME: Textbook 100% + going to class; to know the important points. Classes is only good for knowing the facts, and you can't use classes to understand new stuff; because understanding stuff takes alot of time and there's no pause button (I hope there is: like youtube) for a lecturer to speak. -For example: at undegrad it took me hours to understand a single page of physic, but imagine doing this in class! (you can't do it)

    I also have a learning disability too. I didn't know what it was but since my childhood my mother didn't let me do extra classes (like other kids) because I'm too slow, but that's a blessing because now I understand what "intelligence" really was! -Intelligence is the speed you figure things out (like puzzle or problem solving), so given time: even an average can became genius.

    So my point is: you don't try to understand stuff in class, you do it before class.
    This is very helpful advice! It is definitely something that I will try to practice from now on.

    Thank you!
    Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted. Albert Einstein
    Reply With Quote  
     

  18. #17  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    62
    I know how you feel. Going to uni for 2 months now. I've been already through 2 1000 page thick books on chemistry and biochemistry. It works by learning everything before the teacher is going to tell what you are supposed to learn. Sounds hard, but suddenly the teacher makes sense when he is blabbaring to the walls.
    "the cake is not a lie, you just won't get any" - girl on the next floor
    Reply With Quote  
     

  19. #18  
    Moderator Moderator
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    8,416
    Is pre-university a British term. I've never heard it used in the states. Does it mean the 1st two years of college, the last two of High school or something else.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  20. #19  
    Forum Ph.D.
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Behind the enlightening rod.
    Posts
    936
    Friends teaching at community college level report deplorable skill levels among incoming students, as if asleep throughout secondary school. This sort of advice should be given earlier and taken to heart. Much of benefit has been exchanged, all are to be commended.
    The bravest are surely those who have the clearest vision of what is before them, glory and danger alike, and yet notwithstanding go out to meet it.- Thucydides
    Reply With Quote  
     

  21. #20  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    62
    Quote Originally Posted by The Finger Prince View Post
    Friends teaching at community college level report deplorable skill levels among incoming students, as if asleep throughout secondary school. This sort of advice should be given earlier and taken to heart. Much of benefit has been exchanged, all are to be commended.
    Yeah but I dont think they are sleeping. Most teenagers have quite a bit on their mind in the time they have to learn the basics for getting trough university (which feels like someone is trying to cram those books through your throat and you have to re-learn to breath). Also the way we are supposed to learn things is extremely boring even when the subjects are interesting.

    In my case, I made it through highschool completely on my improvisation skills which is now proving to be utterly useless in university.
    "the cake is not a lie, you just won't get any" - girl on the next floor
    Reply With Quote  
     

  22. #21  
    Moderator Moderator
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    8,416
    "completely on my improvisation skills which is now proving to be utterly useless in university. "

    Interesting. If you mean "improvisational," as in being more creative that should help you rather than hurt you.

    I had similar thoughts about the inadequacy of some of my student during the year I taught college. I wasn't a very good teacher though, pretty much blindly following a work and text book rather than build a good curriculum or deliberately making my subject interesting. From what I remember though many of my poor students didn't' know how to take notes and at the time I didn't take the time to teach them (bad).
    Meteorologist/Naturalist & Retired Soldier
    “The Holy Land is everywhere” Black Elk
    Reply With Quote  
     

  23. #22  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    62
    Well I mean more that I had creative ways of answering. In a, b, c questions where I could not solve a or b but knew what to do with c i would make some numbers up and work with those. Now they make the questions in a way that its nearly impossible to do that. Alos simply using the "shoot in the dark" trick wont work either. In highschool, if I was unsure i simply wrote a lot of text and hoped i was right somewhere. Now I get minus point for guessing wrong and giving the right answer at the same time. This also meanst that if i'm only partly right in a duble question I'm still not getting any points. Using other ways of getting to the same result is also not always accepted. Now they want actuall skill, something I'm lacking. There are only a few teachers who are really great. I've had over 100 through the years but only seen 4 or 5 actual good ones.
    "the cake is not a lie, you just won't get any" - girl on the next floor
    Reply With Quote  
     

  24. #23  
    Comet Dust Collector Moderator
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    New Jersey, USA
    Posts
    2,848
    Gee, sounds like you might have to put some effort in to actually learn the subject, instead of guessing. That is, after all, the idea of getting an education...
    Reply With Quote  
     

  25. #24  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    62
    Quote Originally Posted by MeteorWayne View Post
    Gee, sounds like you might have to put some effort in to actually learn the subject, instead of guessing. That is, after all, the idea of getting an education...
    That is what I'm saying. ^-^
    "the cake is not a lie, you just won't get any" - girl on the next floor
    Reply With Quote  
     

  26. #25  
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    14,168
    Quote Originally Posted by Argon View Post
    . I've had over 100 through the years but only seen 4 or 5 actual good ones.
    I wonder if any of them saw any good students?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  27. #26  
    墨子 DaBOB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    1,674
    Depends somewhat on the professor and the classes. I had a similar struggle when I first started. I was getting terrible grades while simultaneously tutoring people on the same subjects, and other classes I got perfect grades. The difference between then and now is that now I'm doing it because I want to, and I study like mad on my own. If I can spend eight hours a day packing bags in a retail shop I can certainly spend ten to twelve hours a day studying! Professors are merely guides, and you would do well to befriend them if you can. I've had the luck of choosing a field of study which has very small classes and more personal time, however this also puts more pressure to do well.
    Do not try and bend the spoon. That's impossible. Instead... only realize the truth. There is no spoon. Then you'll see that it is not the spoon that bends, it is only yourself. -Spoon Boy
    Reply With Quote  
     

  28. #27  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    62
    Quote Originally Posted by Ophiolite View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Argon View Post
    . I've had over 100 through the years but only seen 4 or 5 actual good ones.
    I wonder if any of them saw any good students?
    I'm sure they have. The great teachers seemed to magically spawn good students because they managed to not only make their subject understandable but also made it magically interesting and everyone wanted to know more. Ofcaurse nearly every class i've ever been in had also one kid with off the chart good grates too ^-^

    I had one teacher for biology who was cold as ice but she could tell about the subject like they where delicate works of art. Suddenly bugs where the most remarkable things that lived on earth and the fragile balance of ecosystems seemed suddenly worth to study. Her classes used to score twice as good as any other class while she didn't correct her own classes tests nor did she make them.
    "the cake is not a lie, you just won't get any" - girl on the next floor
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •