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Thread: THE us system!

  1. #1 THE us system! 
    Forum Ph.D.
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    how dose it go ?
    high school - universaty?

    how is it you go about gettting to uni?


    Stumble on through life.
    Feel free to correct any false information, which unknown to me, may be included in my posts. (also - let this be a disclaimer)
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  3. #2  
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    high school > university
    is it different in Europe?


    - sploit -
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  4. #3  
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    In the netherlands, children go to the "Basisschool" (Dutch), which is basically the basic form of education everyone will follow. They go here from age 3/4 and go there until age 11/12

    Than, you get "Middelbare school", which is comparable to the highschool. Now it get's kinda fuzzy.

    You have three levels. You have VWO, HAVO and VMBO. VWO is the highest level and reserved for the 'smartest' children. It takes 6 years to complete. HAVO is the level just beneath VWO and takes 5 years to complete.
    Than you have VMBO, which takes 4 years to complete, and is split in several different levels. All of which are pretty simplistic. VMBO is the 'lowest' level of education.

    Than there is 'professional education'. This education is intented at teaching you a profession. There is MBO and LBO Medium and low proffesional education for people from the VMBO, and there is 'higher professional education' for people from the HAVO.
    Finally, people from the VWO can go to university.

    LBO can be, for example a carpenter.
    MBO can be, for example a secretary.

    Now, HBO is higher education, basically college, it aims at professions like teacher, Human Resource Manager (the education I am currently following), and other such professions.

    Finally, there is the university, which is a real academic education. It's not an education for a profession, but rather in a discipline. For example, psychology or canon law or international law.

    Now, interesting to note is the 'propedeuse system'. If you have finished MBO, you have completed, basically, the HAVO system, and you are allowed access to the HBO.

    Now, after completing the first year of HBO, and getting your 'propedeuse' (this may vary per education, though), you are allowed access to the university.

    I did in high-school, the beta side, math and science and biology, and am now doing the business side. On the university I will finally be doing psychology, where my heart lies.

    Although this is far from what the government intends to do, I like the way I am following my life, as I have gotten a taste of all the different sectors the dutch, and in fact, international market has to offer, and I'm comfortable in my place as psychologist in the future .

    Sorry for the long post :P


    Mr U
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  5. #4  
    Forum Sophomore buffstuff's Avatar
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    Why's it have to be so confusing? If they went with the US system, it would all be easier.
    Progress isn't made by early risers. It's made by lazy men trying to find easier ways to do something. -Robert Heinlein
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  6. #5  
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    Easier, yes.
    But there is something to be said for taking the dificult path.

    I personally think that the US educational system is fuct beyond all belief.
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  7. #6  
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    It ia, but that's do to incorrect priorities... not the naming of the schools.

    Most high population areas have 'magnet' high schools that only the most intelligent children are able to go to. Universities are also this way... so it seems to be similar to the Dutch system in that respect.

    The difference is that the Dutch system is specific on it's goals of starting people on jobs for life. The US system is basically about securing funding... with education as a side-effect.
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  8. #7  
    Forum Sophomore cleft's Avatar
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    In many ways, I too find fault with the US education system. It is far too polical in nature and the rewards for being a teacher are not in line with the responcibilies nor the education level required to practice as a teacher.

    Add to this that many of the methods now practiced aren't really educational in nature. For instance, where does the RIAA get off in getting access to schools to teach the corporation line of copyright without also being balanced enough to teach what is permissable within copyright laws at the same time? It is a sort of one way, one sided, be a good consumer being taught to the young and in no way should be allowed in its present form access to schools.

    In the line of rewards, much of the financing for the teachers are at the control of the politicans who play funny with the figures. A good place to point an example of this is in Florida. Passage of a state lottery system vote was helped by the idea that some of the money gained from the state lottery would be ear-marked for education. What wasn't said was that the traditional state funding would be reduced by almost the same amount that the state lottery contributed to the education system. So no gains in the end for a financially strapped education system.

    The idea that "No child left behind" theme in the current Bush administration has caused no end of problems for teaching. While the rest of the class has to wait for the slowest to catch up, the teacher winds up spending the most time with those of slower capabilites in learning. This in turns gives others boredom of education while waiting. Not exactly a learning enviroment encouraging the advancement of those gifted in quick learning.

    The present idea of calculating how effective a teacher is by the grades of the students in their annual testing doesn't encourge better students either. Instead what the student then learns is how to pass a test and not the knowledge that should be gleaned from learning institutions.

    The post of HomoUniversalis in how Dutch schools are set up makes much more sense to gain the most from the students time than does the current setup in the US. It is geared to the capabilities of the student and what the student can achieve rather than the other way around. Having the best teachers doesn't help if the student isn't capable of grasping the material or of dealing with the speed of presentation.
    "Moral indignation is jealousy with a halo."
    - H. G. Wells (1866-1946)
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