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Thread: Earth's Ocean

  1. #1 Earth's Ocean 
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    Is it known how the earth's oceans formed? It's an awful lot of water!


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  3. #2  
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    Its Said; When the earth was cooling, long before atmosphere and while the solar system was forming, meteor and asteroids rained down on the earth. Many containing large amounts of ice. They were absorbed by, what became the mantle as steam, helping to cool the planet.

    Later when Earth had cooled some, volcanoes erupting, allowing steam to escape into what was becoming an atmosphere. Rain then fell, nothing like todays clear rain. For some time the rain hitting the earth, evaporated immediately, combined with the ongoing volcano activity. As the atmosphere thickened, more and more incoming ice evaporated into the atmosphere before hitting the ground. Even today we receive tons of space debris daily, much of it as ice.

    Water makes up very little of the total mass of earth. It does cover 70% of the surface, but a relatively thin layer. Much of what allowed this involves the earths *Electro Magnetic Field* which developed as the earth cooled, forming the core and mantle. This field protected and still does the earth and atmosphere from solar activity. For where the oceans are today you need to get into *plate tectonics*, as the continents split off and moved away from a single junk of land.

    Of course this all took billions of years which many phases are thought to have occurred. As I recall, think they figured the original lifeless oceans were green, from the sulfur emissions from volcanoes. The History Channel runs an Hour Feature every so often on these formations and particulars can be researched over google.


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  4. #3  
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    portcontrol, I have bumped this back up. Hope its gives you an insight to one of two major theories....
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  5. #4  
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    There's also some thinking that Jupiter did played a role in redirecting many planetoids and icy asteroids into the inner solar system which would have contributed to the external contribution of water as they collided with an early earth.
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  6. #5  
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    No if i remember its the other way around. Jupiter with its massive gravity directs the asteroids away from us and in to the outer solar system.
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