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Thread: How do geologists distinguish between fossils formed by rapid deposition and those formed by slow deposition?

  1. #1 How do geologists distinguish between fossils formed by rapid deposition and those formed by slow deposition? 
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    A potential problem that I've stumbled across in this article:
    Quote Originally Posted by https://evofantasy.blogspot.com/2011/08/polystrate-tree-fossils.html
    HOWEVER, since you admit that they were buried in rapidly deposited layers, THEN tell us how we are to distinguish the rock strata built up in such a fashion from those built up more slowly. Must be pretty subtle differences, Mr. Wise, of gossamer fine subtlety I suspect, mystifyingly fine just to stand back and look at a stack of strata and wonder which might have been which. Oh the ones with the polystrate trees in them, THOSE were rapidly deposited. Right.
    A answer in the reply section states:
    Quote Originally Posted by Fath aka Connie
    Now I'll admit geology does simplify saying that deposition "is" millions of years, but in reality, in modern systems, we find exceptions of landslides, flash flood, and natural dam breaks "glacial or earth" can provided local rapid deposition, and these phenomenon are observed across the world.
    But it does not really answer the questions I have in mind.

    FLFOMOY: Fossilized layers formed over millions of years
    FLFBRD: Fossilized layers formed by rapid deposition

    When given fossil layers, what is the process (what is it, step-by-step?) that we use to determine whether they are FLFBRD or FLFOMOY?
    How many polystrate fossils sites have been studied using this process?
    What percentage (%) of them have been determined by this process to be FLFBRD?
    What percentage (%) of them have been determined by this process to be FLFOMOY?

    I cannot find acceptable answers to any of my 4 questions on google probably because my questions are too specific.


    Last edited by RamenNoodles; June 18th, 2018 at 01:27 AM.
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  3. #2  
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    Quote Originally Posted by RamenNoodles View Post
    A potential problem that I've stumbled across in this article:
    Quote Originally Posted by https://evofantasy.blogspot.com/2011/08/polystrate-tree-fossils.html
    HOWEVER, since you admit that they were buried in rapidly deposited layers, THEN tell us how we are to distinguish the rock strata built up in such a fashion from those built up more slowly. Must be pretty subtle differences, Mr. Wise, of gossamer fine subtlety I suspect, mystifyingly fine just to stand back and look at a stack of strata and wonder which might have been which. Oh the ones with the polystrate trees in them, THOSE were rapidly deposited. Right.
    A answer in the reply section states:
    Quote Originally Posted by Fath aka Connie
    Now I'll admit geology does simplify saying that deposition "is" millions of years, but in reality, in modern systems, we find exceptions of landslides, flash flood, and natural dam breaks "glacial or earth" can provided local rapid deposition, and these phenomenon are observed across the world.
    But it does not really answer the questions I have in mind.

    FLFOMOY: Fossilized layers formed over millions of years
    FLFBRD: Fossilized layers formed by rapid deposition

    When given fossil layers, what is the process (what is it, step-by-step?) that we use to determine whether they are FLFBRD or FLFOMOY?
    How many polystrate fossils sites have been studied using this process?
    What percentage (%) of them have been determined by this process to be FLFBRD?
    What percentage (%) of them have been determined by this process to be FLFOMOY?

    I cannot find acceptable answers to any of my 4 questions on google probably because my questions are too specific.
    I am not sure why you are trying to make a distinction like this. Surely any fossil must be quickly preserved from scavengers and deterioration, or it would not survive to be fossilised, would it? So I would have thought that ALL fossils are fairly rapidly covered by something. The processes by which the covered remains are then fossilised seem to be very varied however, as the Wiki article illustrates: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fossil


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  4. #3  
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    I've taken a while to reflect on my original question, and I've decided to modify it to remove some mistakes in order to get closer to what I really want to know.

    FMY: formed over millions of years
    FRD: formed by rapid deposition
    1) When given a column of Stratum, what is the process (what is it, step-by-step?) that we use to best determine whether it is FMY or FRD?
    2) How many polystrate fossils sites (specifically, with the subject of study being the Stratum that surrounds the polystrate fossils) have been studied using this process?
    3) What percentage (%) of them have been best determined by this process to be FMY?
    4) What percentage (%) of them have been best determined by this process to be FRD?

    Could we start with the first question?
    1) When given a column of Stratum, what is the process (what is it, step-by-step?) that we use to best determine whether it is FMY or FRD?
    Quote Originally Posted by jocular View Post
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  5. #4  
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    Quote Originally Posted by RamenNoodles View Post
    I've taken a while to reflect on my original question, and I've decided to modify it to remove some mistakes in order to get closer to what I really want to know.

    FMY: formed over millions of years
    FRD: formed by rapid deposition
    1) When given a column of Stratum, what is the process (what is it, step-by-step?) that we use to best determine whether it is FMY or FRD?
    2) How many polystrate fossils sites (specifically, with the subject of study being the Stratum that surrounds the polystrate fossils) have been studied using this process?
    3) What percentage (%) of them have been best determined by this process to be FMY?
    4) What percentage (%) of them have been best determined by this process to be FRD?

    Could we start with the first question?
    1) When given a column of Stratum, what is the process (what is it, step-by-step?) that we use to best determine whether it is FMY or FRD?
    You seem to be assuming that these two categories exist. Why do you think this?
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  6. #5  
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    Quote Originally Posted by exchemist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by RamenNoodles View Post
    I've taken a while to reflect on my original question, and I've decided to modify it to remove some mistakes in order to get closer to what I really want to know.

    FMY: formed over millions of years
    FRD: formed by rapid deposition
    1) When given a column of Stratum, what is the process (what is it, step-by-step?) that we use to best determine whether it is FMY or FRD?
    2) How many polystrate fossils sites (specifically, with the subject of study being the Stratum that surrounds the polystrate fossils) have been studied using this process?
    3) What percentage (%) of them have been best determined by this process to be FMY?
    4) What percentage (%) of them have been best determined by this process to be FRD?

    Could we start with the first question?
    1) When given a column of Stratum, what is the process (what is it, step-by-step?) that we use to best determine whether it is FMY or FRD?
    You seem to be assuming that these two categories exist. Why do you think this?
    Because someone claimed:
    Quote Originally Posted by http://www.evcforum.net/dm.php?control=msg&m=530048
    geologists can distinguish between layers formed by rapid depositation and layers formed by slow depositation. It's described in Broadhurst's article.
    I googled for Broadhurst's article, and this was the best that I've got:
    https://www.sciencedirect.com/scienc...37073890901138

    Broadhurst's article describes evidence of deposition from individual tides and of tidal cycles.

    I am looking for a step-by-step process to determine whether a column of stratum was FMY or FRD.
    This process should include, but is not limited to, determining whether a column of stratum was formed by deposition from individual tides and/or tidal cycles.
    Broadhurst's process is not the complete answer to question 1 because it does not take into account other common methods of rapid deposition (e.g. mud slides, lava, etc...).

    Quote Originally Posted by Question 1
    When given a column of Stratum, what is the process (what is it, step-by-step?) that we use to best determine whether it is FMY or FRD?
    Last edited by RamenNoodles; July 6th, 2018 at 05:00 PM.
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  7. #6  
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    Depositional speed is only ONE relevant aspect to fossilization, others are oxygen content, temperature, dissolved elements in the substrate etc. Only focusing on speed of deposition (fossils can be formed in both) is a creationist tactic to make it seem like there is a "PROBLEM" and that fossils are fake.

    There are thousands of fossil producing sites and stratas across the globe, and they most likely form a full range from "FMY" to "FRD", your question is irrelevant to the fact of evolution, and will not give you any results. Theres no database at all the lists what you are asking for, as its rarely ever a thing.
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