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Thread: Climate Engineering - Does it really exist?

  1. #1 Climate Engineering - Does it really exist? 
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    (I think I posted in the wrong forum, my apologies)

    Consider the following,

    Is it possible to take a 5-mile (12-square kilometers) 'sandy desert' that bears extreme hot and cold temperatures, and transform it into a green forest (Grass, trees..etc.)? that can in return balance out the extreme temperatures in the specified and closely adjacent area?

    To clarify my intent, I am wondering if its possible to take large portion of land that has hot weather (Like the Sahara dessert) and by way of planting a massive amount of trees, grass, bushes...etc. I am able to naturally change the weather in the specified region and maybe the region surrounding it.

    Does it need a larger area (10-miles, 50-miles or even more)?
    Will it attract rain and/or snow?
    Will it for example, drop hot temperatures from 112(f) to 102(f) or below?
    And most importantly will the change in climate only be "noticeable" in the forest, or would it impact surrounding regions as well?

    Will the effects change if the proposed area was next to a sea with hot humid weather?

    Thank you guys for reading. All Posts will be apprecaited


    Last edited by mannyfresh; August 26th, 2014 at 02:04 PM.
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  3. #2  
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    Quote Originally Posted by mannyfresh View Post
    Is it possible to take a 5-mile (12-square kilometers) 'sandy desert' that bears extreme hot and cold temperatures, and transform it into a green forest (Grass, trees..etc.)? that can in return balance out the extreme temperatures in the specified and closely adjacent area?
    Sure, it would be considerably cooler due to the cooling caused by transpiration.

    To clarify my intent, I am wondering if its possible to take large portion of land that has hot weather (Like the Sahara dessert) and by way of planting a massive amount of trees, grass, bushes...etc. I am able to naturally change the weather in the specified region and maybe the region surrounding it.
    Again, sure, but you'd need a LOT of water.

    Does it need a larger area (10-miles, 50-miles or even more)?
    Well, the effect depends on area and water release. Phoenix, for example, is large enough and has enough irrigated landscaping that it changes the desert around it slightly (a little more precipitation downwind, reduced day/night temperature swings.) But you're not going to turn desert into forest (unless you water it of course.)
    Will it attract rain and/or snow?
    The transpired water will lead to more rain, but it won't be self sustaining. (In other words you'd be piping water in forever.)
    Will the effects change if the proposed area was next to a sea with hot humid weather?
    Then they will be close to zero, since transpiration does much less when humidity levels are high (and adding more humidity won't do much.)

    If you are looking for a good geoengineering project, flood large areas with seawater. You get a sea (i.e. an ecosystem full of plants and animals) and a large amount of evaporation to drive nearby weather.


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    This has been done. The way I heard it was that some years ago the nation of Chad decided it needed a national Park. They fenced in a 20 mile square of desert protecting the land from herdsmen, camels and goats. 20years later they had a 20 mile square of forest. Just by keeping out the people, camels, and goats. Note this is just something I heard about I can't prove it is true.
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    Quote Originally Posted by mannyfresh View Post
    (I think I posted in the wrong forum, my apologies)

    Consider the following,

    Is it possible to take a 5-mile (12-square kilometers) 'sandy desert' that bears extreme hot and cold temperatures, and transform it into a green forest (Grass, trees..etc.)? that can in return balance out the extreme temperatures in the specified and closely adjacent area?

    To clarify my intent, I am wondering if its possible to take large portion of land that has hot weather (Like the Sahara dessert) and by way of planting a massive amount of trees, grass, bushes...etc. I am able to naturally change the weather in the specified region and maybe the region surrounding it.

    Does it need a larger area (10-miles, 50-miles or even more)?
    Will it attract rain and/or snow?
    Will it for example, drop hot temperatures from 112(f) to 102(f) or below?
    And most importantly will the change in climate only be "noticeable" in the forest, or would it impact surrounding regions as well?

    Will the effects change if the proposed area was next to a sea with hot humid weather?

    Thank you guys for reading. All Posts will be apprecaited
    Well.. It is possible.. However not by planting trees. The soil is inadequate for trees, and the soil needs a few years to adapt for trees. This can be done by planting gras, which in turn can only be done by first creating a swamp there.

    Yes, if you create a swamp area, covered partially to protect from intense sun rays, let grass grow for several years, and keep it a swamp, the soil should be good enough for trees to start sprouting there, but i would start with small shrubs, and then trying to make an adequate wildlife ecosystem there by introducing several types of animals there.

    This whole process will take about 10 years. After this, trees can be planted. Animals can be added. And the trees should be changed and replanted every 15 years to adapt to the new density of trees. Also trees would have to be cut if the environment where they flourish have passed. In about 200 years there could be something looking like a rain-forest there, which would be man-made. However, there has to be a steady flow of water, and it needs to keep there the whole time during swamp time.

    Estimated costs for 12 square kilometers would be 50 Billion in 200 years, not counting inflation. Of which about 5 billion will be spent the first year to get the grasses growing.
    Last edited by Zwolver; August 27th, 2014 at 06:14 AM.
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sealeaf View Post
    This has been done. The way I heard it was that some years ago the nation of Chad decided it needed a national Park. They fenced in a 20 mile square of desert protecting the land from herdsmen, camels and goats. 20years later they had a 20 mile square of forest. Just by keeping out the people, camels, and goats. Note this is just something I heard about I can't prove it is true.
    It's also been done in the Ukraine, completely unintentionally. The healthiest ecosystem in the whole area is now the exclusion zone around Chernobyl. (However that wasn't an issue of a desert turning to a forest. just a radioactive wasteland turning into a forest.)
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    Quote Originally Posted by billvon View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Sealeaf View Post
    This has been done. The way I heard it was that some years ago the nation of Chad decided it needed a national Park. They fenced in a 20 mile square of desert protecting the land from herdsmen, camels and goats. 20years later they had a 20 mile square of forest. Just by keeping out the people, camels, and goats. Note this is just something I heard about I can't prove it is true.
    It's also been done in the Ukraine, completely unintentionally. The healthiest ecosystem in the whole area is now the exclusion zone around Chernobyl. (However that wasn't an issue of a desert turning to a forest. just a radioactive wasteland turning into a forest.)
    Yep, people is the worst thing to ever happen to nature. However, it is the only way nature could ever reach other planets. Basically, nature created a monster to conquer the universe. I hope we can conquer the universe for nature before we devour our planet whole.
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
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    Quote Originally Posted by mannyfresh View Post
    To clarify my intent, I am wondering if its possible to take large portion of land that has hot weather (Like the Sahara dessert) and by way of planting a massive amount of trees, grass, bushes...etc. I am able to naturally change the weather in the specified region and maybe the region surrounding it.
    The Sahara is not a desert because it is hot. It is a desert because it is dry.
    Deserts are caused by Hadley cell downdrafts, mountain ranges, elevation, and cold. These are the things that block precipitation from reaching desert areas.
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    First of all, I am so thankful for your responses so very much Totally appreciated.

    If you only knew how long I've had them, and I struggled so much to research it because most Google results lead to a 'GW' related topic!

    Great and very useful info.

    If I may, I'd like some clarifications and to ask everyone another question.

    Now I was just thinking, I have learned that the atmosphere moves in a more predicable manner, so is it possible to predict that by dumping mass-scale sea water in Area (A) I would gain rain in Area (B)? (I'm assuming it will still require some conditions)

    So to clarify I get a 20-km square land in one area for the forest/urban project (B), and then dump LOTS sea water in a different region (A). Because, there was a way to calculate to a certain extent that clouds formed in area (A) will eventually pass by and possibly rain at the designated area (B) that is 10 miles, 100 miles or even more miles away. And lets assume that the proposed forest Area (B) is still relatively dry, how much plantation will be required? (If at all)

    The goal is to have a forest and low rise urban city that is considerably cooler and nicer weather than surrounding region (The forest having the majority share.) Also, it may be worth mentioning that Area (B) isn't that sandy, its just mostly dry land.


    Sorry for my late reply, I will reply sooner the next time, thank you guys once again.
    Last edited by mannyfresh; August 30th, 2014 at 06:59 PM.
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