Notices
Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: The Tunguska Explosion

  1. #1 The Tunguska Explosion 
    Forum Professor leohopkins's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Dulwich, London, England
    Posts
    1,416
    In 1908 over siberia, a huge explosion occured which flattened thousands of acres of siberian forest. Experts say the explosion occured roughly 8km above the Earth and with something like a force of 50 hiroshima bombs. Scientists are not sure what exactly it could be. I have my own theories but id like to hear yours.

    Here is one of the links, although you maybe able to find more info by googling it:

    http://www-th.bo.infn.it/tunguska/


    The hand of time rested on the half-hour mark, and all along that old front line of the English there came a whistling and a crying. The men of the first wave climbed up the parapets, in tumult, darkness, and the presence of death, and having done with all pleasant things, advanced across No Man's Land to begin the Battle of the Somme. - Poet John Masefield.

    www.leohopkins.com
    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Forum Ph.D. william's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Wherever I go, there I am
    Posts
    935
    Most likely a comet I'd say....


    "... the polhode rolls without slipping on the herpolhode lying in the invariable plane."
    ~Footnote in Goldstein's Mechanics, 3rd ed. p. 202
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    14,168
    Proposed explanations have included:
    a) a comet
    b) an asteroid
    c) a black hole
    d) a nuclear powered spacecraft

    The evidence is most consistent with it being a comet. Certainly, given the airblast we are looking at a poorly consolidated body. This suggests comet or stony asteroid. (The latter are generally rubble bodies rather than cohesive structures.) With no detected debris the possibility of asteroid diminshes, and the volatile comet becomes the preferred option.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Forum Ph.D. Cat1981(England)'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    South Downs.
    Posts
    913
    I'm adding my vote to a comet as well.
    Eat Dolphin, save the Tuna!!!!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5 Telsa 
    Forum Professor leohopkins's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Dulwich, London, England
    Posts
    1,416
    Another story I heard was that it could have been Nikola Tesla experimenting with directed high energy beams, or something like that. A comet is indeed the most likely culprit, as I have also heard that around the time it happened in 1908, it appearer to be almost daylight in the early hours of the morning for a few days. this to me suggests a wide spread scattering of some light refracting particles in the atmosphere. comet dust is more likely. I would not say that it could have been a stony or an iron meteorite as there is no visible impact crater. Just thousands of acres of trees, completely devastated.

    Thank god it didnt hit a populated area !!
    The hand of time rested on the half-hour mark, and all along that old front line of the English there came a whistling and a crying. The men of the first wave climbed up the parapets, in tumult, darkness, and the presence of death, and having done with all pleasant things, advanced across No Man's Land to begin the Battle of the Somme. - Poet John Masefield.

    www.leohopkins.com
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Forum Ph.D. Cat1981(England)'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    South Downs.
    Posts
    913
    I haven't read about this for a long time but if i remember, there was a loud noise heard hundreds of miles away.
    Eat Dolphin, save the Tuna!!!!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7 Re: Telsa 
    Forum Senior
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    321
    Quote Originally Posted by leohopkins
    Another story I heard was that it could have been Nikola Tesla experimenting with directed high energy beams, or something like that. A comet is indeed the most likely culprit, as I have also heard that around the time it happened in 1908, it appearer to be almost daylight in the early hours of the morning for a few days. this to me suggests a wide spread scattering of some light refracting particles in the atmosphere. comet dust is more likely. I would not say that it could have been a stony or an iron meteorite as there is no visible impact crater. Just thousands of acres of trees, completely devastated.

    Thank god it didnt hit a populated area !!
    You might have heard the Nikola Tesla story but that myth is 100% baloney.

    It was some bolide entering the Earth's atmosphere. Interesting post above about light in the atmosphere from light reflelcting particles.

    I wouldn't put any absolutes on it being either a comet or asteroid but I lean toward a comet. As a geologist I remind myself that the absence to date of certain asteroid produced debris doesn't mean they aren't out there and just not found.

    Question: is it possible for an object 'to skip' through the atmosphere and cause a shock wave like the Tungusta and then land further north in the Arctic Ocean or to leave the Earth's atmosphere and back into space?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #8 Hmmm...... 
    Forum Professor leohopkins's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Dulwich, London, England
    Posts
    1,416
    Logically thinking, id say that if an object were to "skip" on tha atmosphere as you say then what we would have to look for is an elliptical pattern of compression / destruction of trees as the shockwave would appear to be "scattered" in this fashion due to the angle of trajectory, as opposed to a "circle" which would imply a direct "downward" blast. Im not a scientist or a mathematician, im just trying my best to think about what would happen in this case using a thought experiment. Another possible scenario i'm thinking about is we all know what the "oh my god particle" was and how much energy it carried. What if a whole bunch of these "oh my god" particles arrived together ? Could they carry the energy alone needed for such devestation ? OR could they carry enough energy to some how convert some small piece of matter into anti-matter and then BANG! It was immediately annhialated ?
    The hand of time rested on the half-hour mark, and all along that old front line of the English there came a whistling and a crying. The men of the first wave climbed up the parapets, in tumult, darkness, and the presence of death, and having done with all pleasant things, advanced across No Man's Land to begin the Battle of the Somme. - Poet John Masefield.

    www.leohopkins.com
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #9  
    Forum Sophomore
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    159
    I add my vote to a cometl. :-D
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •