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Thread: Oil question

  1. #1 Oil question 
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    Does oil act like coolant , keeping the core and surface of the earth from increasing in temperature? If all the oil was gone, would Global Warming increase, to a point of no return unless we we do drastic measures?


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    uh? where on earth did that little gem spring from?


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  4. #3 Re: Oil question 
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    Quote Originally Posted by starlight
    Does oil act like coolant , keeping the core of the earth from increasing in temperature? If all the oil is gone, would Global Warming increase, to a point of no return unless we we do drastic measures?
    no starlight, oil is not like the water in your car that cools the engine or warms the heater. oil is like the steering wheel or the tires (parts), which we use to produce things, including that steering wheel and tire.

    the core, or what covers the core has its own cooling process, which is deadly to humans. there are many vents in the oceans that allow gases to continuously escape from inside the crust and for some reason this stuff builds up pressures and we see as volcano's, lava and gases. its best we hope the earth maintains this heat, since we really don't want it.

    as for the oil, whatever creates oil (there are a couple thoughts) is for sure a process. this process is on going, even if less then we use and some will always be there. some is thought to be quite deep and plentiful, of which we may never get to. underground temperature are pretty constant and according to depth, so everything around the oil and the oil have the same temps.
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    Are you saying the oil well will never empty or there will always be another location to take its place?
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    Quote Originally Posted by starlight
    Are you saying the oil well will never empty or there will always be another location to take its place?
    not exactly. i am saying for what ever reason the process to form oil is happening someplace. what ever created that substance in one spot is likely not now there. there are some that think in Saudi Arabia and that area the few rivers that flow are rich in chemicals and nutrients and may be refilling a supply now in use. this is speculative.

    some old wells when revisited are found to have more oil then thought but here again for other reasons.

    the point of your thread, i thought, was a cooling effect on the core which oil could not have, the empty space or anything that filled in that space. if any liquid has a cooling effect on the core, it should be ocean waters, not oil.
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    I'm very new to this subject, oil. But I thought oil was mostly found in deserts. So I assume oil is to desert like north pole is to the ocean. It seems like earth is fine tune like the universe. Any changes to it would cause a change and the earth would have to retune.
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  8. #7  
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    Quote Originally Posted by starlight
    But I thought oil was mostly found in deserts. .
    Often, not mostly.
    And they are only deserts today. The deserts at the surface, have no connection with the source and reservoir rocks for the oil.
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    Quote Originally Posted by starlight
    I'm very new to this subject, oil. But I thought oil was mostly found in deserts. So I assume oil is to desert like north pole is to the ocean. It seems like earth is fine tune like the universe. Any changes to it would cause a change and the earth would have to retune.

    accessibility is a factor and deserts are generally low in elevation. as you know much oil is taken from below the oceans, which have even less elevation. just what formed oil should have some roots in the area. any theory gets a kick in the teeth, when figuring in the oil in Alaska. when the earth was young however Alaska was not where it now is and all the earth was much warmer.

    i am not sure how finely tuned the earth is or the universe. nature is however and we are here as the conditions it provided allowed the process of evolution. taking oil or any other element from the earth is such a small amount compared to what all it is. in the end we take something that was something else, use it and produce something thats actually good for some other of natures products. plant life.
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    Think it also depends on what theory you believe in.. the traditional therory of oil coming from the breakdown of prehistoric plankton and algae. or..... The abiogenic therory with the oil coming from the source of the breakdown of methane and other hydrocarbons from the earths mantle and have been seeping through since the earth creation

    The abiogenic therory had been a mainly russian therory but a dude called thomas gold's research in the 80's has made it more of a possibility than ever before

    just something else to add to the mix :wink:
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    Quote Originally Posted by jackson33
    when the earth was young however Alaska was not where it now is and all the earth was much warmer.
    Was there a north and south pole when the earth was young?


    Quote Originally Posted by jackson33
    i am not sure how finely tuned the earth is or the universe. nature is however and we are here as the conditions it provided allowed the process of evolution. taking oil or any other element from the earth is such a small amount compared to what all it is. in the end we take something that was something else, use it and produce something thats actually good for some other of natures products. plant life.
    Well, if the oceans become really warm, this would lead to more natural disasters. Probably, if most of the oil was used up, there would be a layer missing, acting like coolant, which was helping reduce pressure to the inner core.
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  12. #11  
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    Quote Originally Posted by captaincaveman
    Think it also depends on what theory you believe in.. the traditional therory of oil coming from the breakdown of prehistoric plankton and algae. or..... The abiogenic therory with the oil coming from the source of the breakdown of methane and other hydrocarbons from the earths mantle and have been seeping through since the earth creation

    The abiogenic therory had been a mainly russian therory but a dude called thomas gold's research in the 80's has made it more of a possibility than ever before

    just something else to add to the mix :wink:

    The demand for oil would eventually be to great for earths resources. It probably would take a long time for the oil process to take shape.
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  13. #12  
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    Quote Originally Posted by starlight
    Quote Originally Posted by captaincaveman
    Think it also depends on what theory you believe in.. the traditional therory of oil coming from the breakdown of prehistoric plankton and algae. or..... The abiogenic therory with the oil coming from the source of the breakdown of methane and other hydrocarbons from the earths mantle and have been seeping through since the earth creation

    The abiogenic therory had been a mainly russian therory but a dude called thomas gold's research in the 80's has made it more of a possibility than ever before

    just something else to add to the mix :wink:

    The demand for oil would eventually be to great for earths resources. It probably would take a long time for the oil process to take shape.

    i see what your saying but the theory is that its constantly seeping through(obvoiusly not infinite) but potentially more oil than is realised
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    starlight;

    yes w/o getting into magnetic fields; what is now the poles were there from the time of formation. the planet however was very hot all over from internal heat opposed to solar heat. it is thought no ice existed on the planet until about one billion years ago, from the total age of 4.5 billion.
    about 800 million years back they feel the first major ice age began and no doubt the first area of ice was near these poles, for lack of solar light. then over the next 200 million years or 600 million years back ice formed on much of the earths service. it then again turned warm but not as warm as before. many things happened during this period and a cooling trend again took hold forming the second major ice age. this was from 350 million years back to about 240 million years ago. the earth again began to warm and all ice melted. i have not seen a connection to the continental shifts but this to was going on during the period as well as many forms of life. then another warm spell and this lasted to about 100 thousand years ago when what is called a mini ice age hit the earth. the poles have certainly have been ice covered from this time and many of the glaciers around the planet. another mini in 12k BC and 1k BC, each warm or cold less then the prior.

    by what is today the planet has been progressively violent as you go back in time. continental shift, mountain formations, volcano activity and asteroid or meteor strikes, just some examples.

    you may not know this; the north pole ice or glacier is on ocean waters and the southern poles primarily on land, Antarctica is also the seventh continent.

    oil is in pockets and very little of the earths mass. there is no layer. no imbalance can be produce and so on...the weights of the glaciers we have talked about far out weight the total oil on the planet. they have come and gone displacing unbelievable pressures.
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    Does oil act like coolant , keeping the core and surface of the earth from increasing in temperature? If all the oil was gone, would Global Warming increase, to a point of no return unless we we do drastic measures?
    I do not beleive the abscence of oil (typically replaced by water if Im not mistaken) in geological stratas will have any significant effect on Climat change or geothermal heating.

    GHG will probably be what ignites the climat change fiasco. Beyond what we're already spewing, when permafrost regions melt, which is now underway, massive amounts of additional GHG will be released.

    The demand for oil would eventually be to great for earths resources. It probably would take a long time for the oil process to take shape.
    Imo the demand for oil is partially due to the fact that a handful of powerful people make money from it and so have had a vested interest in crushing substitutes for the past 100 years.
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    ice; until very recently gas was about .25 to .50 per gallon plus tax at the pump. i see no alternative that would equate to that cost. today the cost is up to 1.25 to 1.50 per gallon and generates a great deal of energy. some alternatives are showing up but the cost of that gallon is far less than even a gallon of bottled water, much less any other liquid. as to crushing those other unexplained power sources, economics simply prevailed.

    now for those few people that make money from the oil industry. I'm not sure if your talking about the people owning the rights, the geologist that determine the cost/efficiency factors, the drillers, the pipe line manufactures or the ones that lay them, the truck drivers and companies that transport, or may be the refiners. surely your not talking about the city, state or federal governments that have generated more revenue then the profits of all the above. then you really don't care to hear of the millions that pensions, educations and jobs that have been from oil. yes your may be correct only about 80 to 100 million people around the world have directly benefited and only about 2.5 billion from the cheap fuel but those few really can't help your implied cause.
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  17. #16  
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    Quote Originally Posted by jackson33
    it is thought no ice existed on the planet until about one billion years ago, from the total age of 4.5 billion.
    about 800 million years back they feel the first major ice age began
    This is incorrect. The origin of ice ages is complex, depending upon solar output (substantially lower in the past), atmospheric composition, continental distribution, etc.

    The earliest hypothesized ice age is believed to have occurred around 2.7 to 2.3 billion (109) years ago during the early Proterozoic Age.


    Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ice_ages#Major_ice_ages
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  18. #17  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ophiolite
    Quote Originally Posted by jackson33
    it is thought no ice existed on the planet until about one billion years ago, from the total age of 4.5 billion.
    about 800 million years back they feel the first major ice age began
    This is incorrect. The origin of ice ages is complex, depending upon solar output (substantially lower in the past), atmospheric composition, continental distribution, etc.

    The earliest hypothesized ice age is believed to have occurred around 2.7 to 2.3 billion (109) years ago during the early Proterozoic Age.


    Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ice_ages#Major_ice_ages
    not correct; according to three sources, no ice was thought to have existed prior to one billion years ago. this came from various time lines on origin of the plant. i don't question the complexity and the reason i didn't go into. from what i have read, however ice before this time would seem to be unlikely.
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    According to this:
    http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?art...81809EC588EF21

    You are incorrect, jackson. Also, where are these mysterious "three sources?"

    However, I think this is the ice age you are referring to, jackson.

    The earliest well-documented ice age, and probably the most severe of the last 1 billion years, occurred from 800 to 600 million years ago (the Cryogenian period) and it has been suggested that it produced a Snowball Earth in which permanent sea ice extended to or very near the equator.
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  20. #19  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeremyhfht
    According to this:
    http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?art...81809EC588EF21

    You are incorrect, jackson. Also, where are these mysterious "three sources?"

    However, I think this is the ice age you are referring to, jackson.

    The earliest well-documented ice age, and probably the most severe of the last 1 billion years, occurred from 800 to 600 million years ago (the Cryogenian period) and it has been suggested that it produced a Snowball Earth in which permanent sea ice extended to or very near the equator.
    the time line i used was "Encarta". some research done about six months ago seemed to back it up. the link you provided gives much of what i recall, credence to what i saw...interprutation not withstanding...
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  21. #20 Re: Oil question 
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    Quote Originally Posted by starlight
    Does oil act like coolant , keeping the core and surface of the earth from increasing in temperature? If all the oil was gone, would Global Warming increase, to a point of no return unless we we do drastic measures?
    As a geologist I can give you a straight answer: No

    Also, the amount of oil in relation to the mass of the Earth is almost irrelevent.

    It's a positive, however, that you are using your noggin to think outside the box and try to understand larger geologic processes at work. Reality is full of some very strange phenomena and the more questions asked, the more we explore and eventually learn.
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