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View Poll Results: What contributes more the the increase of Carbon Dioxide in the atmosphere?

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  • Air pollution

    2 50.00%
  • Other

    1 25.00%
  • Vegitation loss

    1 25.00%
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Air Pollution vs Vegitation Loss

  1. #1 Air Pollution vs Vegitation Loss 
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    A friend and I are having a small argument that I'm hoping someone here can help me settle. I claimed that air pollution produced by industry, traffic, ect. is the major cause of increased Carbon Dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere. My friend on the other hand thinks that the major cause in the increase of Carbon Dioxide concentrations is vegetation loss. Plants naturally convert Carbon Dioxide to Oxygen during respiration, so the massive clear cutting around the world is the major source of increased concentrations. I've looked on Google and can't find much in terms of comparing the two competing possibilities. So which is it?


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  3. #2  
    Forum Professor captaincaveman's Avatar
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    i think vegitation doesn't take out that much carbon dioxide compared with plankton. If i remember correctly plankton takes out the largest amount


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  4. #3  
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    It's quite possibly the planet itself.

    However, the earth has gone through systematic warming and cooling stages. Sometimes the warming stage was so warm there wasn't any snow in most areas.
    Then, however, it gets cold. Ice age comes, and we get trouble. Our planet is far from "perfect" in that aspect, as it's happening again. Just pray we have better technology to resist the comming ice-age, that we don't blow ourselves up by then, and that it doesn't come and geological history is utterly wrong. :P

    However, the amount of waste and planetary destruction humans do does add some amount of mixture into the pot. So it isn't exactly HELPING.
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  5. #4  
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    try this; our atmosphere is composed of 77% nitrogen and 21% oxygen at any given point in time. at least in the past 500 years. the remaining 2 % is a combination of many things.

    of all co2 contaminants, all man made represents 6% and that from nature is 94%. mans come from primarily all auto-train-bus-industry and agricultural activity. nature then contributes 94% from many sources primarily from dead and decaying plant or animal life. fire, volcano activity and many other of natures regular events also add to the 94%.

    you and you friend are both wrong. clearing of plant life does not come close to natural filling in of land by nature on burned or vacant land. its thought there is more vegetation and forest today then most anytime in the past 500 years. if for no other reason then we put out forest fires now and in nature it is the common form of cleansing underbrush.

    plants do feed on carbon dioxide and produce oxygen and organic life feed or uses oxygen and produces carbon dioxide. both when dead and in decay mode produce additional co2 in the process.
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  6. #5  
    Forum Professor captaincaveman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jackson33
    try this; our atmosphere is composed of 77% nitrogen and 21% oxygen at any given point in time. at least in the past 500 years. the remaining 2 % is a combination of many things.

    of all co2 contaminants, all man made represents 6% and that from nature is 94%. mans come from primarily all auto-train-bus-industry and agricultural activity. nature then contributes 94% from many sources primarily from dead and decaying plant or animal life. fire, volcano activity and many other of natures regular events also add to the 94%.

    you and you friend are both wrong. clearing of plant life does not come close to natural filling in of land by nature on burned or vacant land. its thought there is more vegetation and forest today then most anytime in the past 500 years. if for no other reason then we put out forest fires now and in nature it is the common form of cleansing underbrush.

    plants do feed on carbon dioxide and produce oxygen and organic life feed or uses oxygen and produces carbon dioxide. both when dead and in decay mode produce additional co2 in the process.
    what about plankton? have you got any figures on where that fits into things? i know its more than plantlife but i dont have a percentage for it :-D
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  7. #6  
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    Umm...by planetary destruction I also meant the increasing amount of pollution put into the air which effects environments and hence...the planet...-.- you basically said I'm correct.
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  8. #7  
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    Yes both of them are internally related...

    The burning of hydrocarbons in motor vehicle engines gives rise to CO2, CO, SO2 (sulfur dioxide), NOx (NO [nitrogen monoxide]) and NO2ā€“ in varying proportions), and C2H4 (ethylene), as well as a variety of other hydrocarbons. Additional SO2 originates from domestic and industrial burning of fossil fuels. Industrial plants, such as chemical works and metal-smelting plants, release SO2, H2S, NO2, and HF (hydrogen fluoride) into the atmosphere. Tall chimney stacks may be used to carry gases and particles to a high altitude and thus avoid local pollution, but the pollutants return to Earth, sometimes hundreds of kilometers from the original source.

    The concentrations of polluting gases, or their solutions, to which plants are exposed are thus highly variable, depending on location, wind direction, rainfall, and sunlight. In urban areas, concentrations of SO2 and NOx in air are typically 0.02 to 0.5 mL Lā€“1, the upper value being within the range that is inhibitory to plant growth. Relatively long-term experiments at appropriate concentrations of pollutants are necessary to establish the real impact of air pollution on vegetation. The reaction of plants to high concentrations of pollutants in short-term experiments may overwhelm the plant's defense mechanisms and provoke abnormal symptoms.
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