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Thread: Calcite limestone

  1. #1 Calcite limestone 
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    Hello guys, this is my first post and as i am not scientist myself i came here looking for information about this certain rock. Im browsing all over the place but without a proper knowledge i cant really say how valuable this is. My father brought a few geologists and we have done basic analysis of the rock but the informations we got from them were really shallow. We will bring some more soon but im very eager to know more about it so i've got no patience at all

    here are analysis of 2 samples of this limestone :

    1)
    MgO 0.6
    CaO 54.8
    insoluble residue + R2O3 = 0.78
    whiteness MgO 95

    2)
    MgO 0.8
    CaO 54.7
    insoluble residue + R2O3 is 0.6
    whiteness MgO 95.3

    Whats it good for ? Are there any other tests i should do to be certain about its uses and value on the market ? If pictures of the rock would help also i can post them tomorrow. Thank you for your time and knowledge !

    if this isnt the right place to ask please direct me.


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  3. #2  
    Time Lord
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    You have calcium oxide? (CaO). That's quicklime. It's pretty useful.

    Calcium oxide - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    I don't know if it has a market value, though.


    Some clocks are only right twice a day, but they are still right when they are right.
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  4. #3  
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    Hi, thanks for reply. I found this chart of limestone analysis in Missouri so according to this (dnr.mo.gov/geology/docs/MineralChemLimestone.pdf) is it safe to say that samples with about the same CaO and MgO would have same CaCo3 and MgCO3 values aswell ? cheers
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  5. #4  
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    Perhaps this may be of interest.

    Limestone is a sedimentary rock often used for building. It is mostly composed of calcite and can form in several different ways, either from chemicals secreted by living sea creatures like coral, from the compression of untold millions of tiny, dead, sea organisms or by chemical processes unrelated to animals living or dead.
    What Is Limestone & How Does It Form? | eHow

    and

    Calcite: A mineral consisting largely of calcium carbonate (CaCO3 ). Next to quartz, it is the most abundant of the Earth's minerals. Crystallizing in the hexagonal system, calcite is noted for its wide variety of crystalline forms.
    What On Earth Calcite, Limestone and Marble | Earth Sciences Museum
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  6. #5  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stefanx View Post
    Hi, thanks for reply. I found this chart of limestone analysis in Missouri so according to this (dnr.mo.gov/geology/docs/MineralChemLimestone.pdf) is it safe to say that samples with about the same CaO and MgO would have same CaCo3 and MgCO3 values aswell ? cheers
    I know for CaO that it spontaneously becomes CaCO3 when it is exposed to the air. That's why I thought it was so exceptional that your soil would contain CaO. In the alternative, CaO can get made by heating up CaCO3, but then there's an energy cost.
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    Some clocks are only right twice a day, but they are still right when they are right.
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  7. #6  
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    I know about the heating process but im interested in CaCO3 value, i guess i should ask this in chemistry section. Cheers
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  8. #7  
    exchemist
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stefanx View Post
    I know about the heating process but im interested in CaCO3 value, i guess i should ask this in chemistry section. Cheers
    Marble has value as a decorative stone, but I'm sure you'd know if this is what you had. Limestone is just a building stone, or is used as feed for the cement industry and for smelting of iron - not very high value applications. Chalk ditto.
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  9. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhDemon View Post
    Calcium carbonate is as an orange antique dealer says "as cheap as chips". For lab based stuff the price is a few bucks per kilo (from personal experience) and for construction $100-$1000 per tonne depending on grade/size of blocks etc. (from a quick google search). You'll need a lot of it to get rich!
    Unless the geologist was clueless his guess was around 1m tons , if he was off by 50% its still a lot, so supplies arent really my problem its the price and placement on the market. Do you mind posting the link here or pm me about the prices you found ?
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  10. #9  
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    Thanks
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  11. #10  
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    Quote Originally Posted by kojax View Post
    You have calcium oxide? (CaO). That's quicklime. It's pretty useful.

    Calcium oxide - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    I don't know if it has a market value, though.
    Calcium Oxide is non-hydrated, and combines directly with water to form the hydrate, with the evolution of heat. I 'spose that's in the Wiki........I believe it was called "Whitewash" when I was a kid. Our basement walls, of masonry, were coated with it. jocular
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