Notices
Results 1 to 18 of 18

Thread: Need help identifying a "rock"

  1. #1 Need help identifying a "rock" 
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    8
    Hello. I found this object in central New Jersey approximately 20 miles from the coast. I don't know much about geology/petrology so I've come to you for assistance. It was found in a remote location in the forest so I would expect it to be a natural formation but I could be wrong. It is magnetic. Google searches lead me to believe it's a "coal clinker". Can anyone identify it? Thank you in advance
    Attached Images


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Forum Professor scoobydoo1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    1,240
    I've referred to my copy of Dorling Kindersley Handbook for Rocks And Minerals, and the following two specimens appear to bear some similarities to your photograph. Until someone else comes in to identify what your specimen really is, perhaps these might be what you're looking at.

    IMG_0397.jpgIMG_0398.jpg

    * I think the "rounded cavaties" shown in the Vesicular Basalt entry is highly similar to what you have. I've also found a similar image with a specimen identified as Scoria.

    Scoria.jpg
    Attached Images


    Last edited by scoobydoo1; May 19th, 2013 at 10:45 PM.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    8
    Thank you for your response scoobydoo1. You're right, they are very similar. One detail I forgot to add is the surface is smooth and looks almost glazed as opposed to a gritty texture like sandstone. Unfortunately the picture was taken with my phone so the color is also slightly off. It's a bit darker than what the picture shows. Can Vesicular Basalt have those characteristics? If so, you are probably correct. Please excuse my lack of knowledge!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    has lost interest seagypsy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    3,103
    It looks like this pumice stone I found on a website selling beauty products.


    Does it float if you put it in water?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Forum Professor scoobydoo1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    1,240
    Quote Originally Posted by mmjwski View Post
    It's a bit darker than what the picture shows. Can Vesicular Basalt have those characteristics? If so, you are probably correct. Please excuse my lack of knowledge!
    I think I ought to let the more experienced and qualified forum members answer that. To be honest, I do not even qualify as an amateur in the subject of Geology. I'm just a person with an above average curiosity on rocks and minerals and find the processes that produces them fascinating. Plus the handbook does have a lot of colorful and pretty pictures.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    8
    Just tested. It sank straight to the bottom. I find it very heavy for its size and the amount of cavities it has. I'm tempted to crack it open but it's been in my possession since I was a child and as silly as it sounds it has some sentimental value to me. Although that may be the easiest way to identify it
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7  
    Forum Professor pyoko's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    1,095
    It looks like an iron meteorite, only a small one. It being magnetic brings to doubt that it is pumice. And it being heavy for its size and sinking.

    It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #8  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by scoobydoo1 View Post
    I think I ought to let the more experienced and qualified forum members answer that. To be honest, I do not even qualify as an amateur in the subject of Geology. I'm just a person with an above average curiosity on rocks and minerals and find the processes that produces them fascinating. Plus the handbook does have a lot of colorful and pretty pictures.
    Either way I really appreciate the help. I'm clueless when it comes to stuff like this
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #9  
    has lost interest seagypsy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    3,103
    Quote Originally Posted by mmjwski View Post
    Just tested. It sank straight to the bottom. I find it very heavy for its size and the amount of cavities it has. I'm tempted to crack it open but it's been in my possession since I was a child and as silly as it sounds it has some sentimental value to me. Although that may be the easiest way to identify it
    If it sank right away then it is probably scoria as scoobydoo suggested. pumice floats for a bit before sinking.

    I'm not an expert either. Not even a hobbyist. Is it magnetic? Pyoko mentioned it but I couldn't find were you had said anything about it being magnetic.

    It shouldn't be too hard to get it identified without destroying it. we had to identify rocks in earth science in 7th grade. We used various chemicals and litmus paper to identify some rocks. You can probably call your local highschool and speak to the earth science teacher there. If they can't help you, they likely can tell you where to get help.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  11. #10  
    Forum Professor pyoko's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    1,095
    An iron meteorite would conduct electricity whereas a lot of terrestrial iron rocks would not. You could try measuring the resistance with a multimeter.
    It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  12. #11  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by pyoko View Post
    It looks like an iron meteorite, only a small one. It being magnetic brings to doubt that it is pumice. And it being heavy for its size and sinking
    After being submerged (this is the first time it's been cleaned other than dusting it off) the color and texture look very similar to your picture. The only difference I can see would be the depth of the cavities
    Reply With Quote  
     

  13. #12  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by seagypsy View Post
    If it sank right away then it is probably scoria as scoobydoo suggested. pumice floats for a bit before sinking.

    I'm not an expert either. Not even a hobbyist. Is it magnetic? Pyoko mentioned it but I couldn't find were you had said anything about it being magnetic.

    It shouldn't be too hard to get it identified without destroying it. we had to identify rocks in earth science in 7th grade. We used various chemicals and litmus paper to identify some rocks. You can probably call your local highschool and speak to the earth science teacher there. If they can't help you, they likely can tell you where to get help.
    It is slightly magnetic. Thank you for the suggestion. I just might do that in the morning
    Reply With Quote  
     

  14. #13  
    has lost interest seagypsy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    3,103
    after re-reading the op a 6th time i finally see where you DID say it was magnetic. I do think my eyes hate me. how i missed that 5 times i do not know. Had i noticed it, i would not have suggested pumice. oh well, no harm done.(except to my ego)
    Reply With Quote  
     

  15. #14  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by pyoko View Post
    An iron meteorite would conduct electricity whereas a lot of terrestrial iron rocks would not. You could try measuring the resistance with a multimeter.
    That's very interesting. If my brother hadn't borrowed my multimeter for the weekend I'd be able to test that now. Looks like I'll have to wait on that. Great piece of information
    Reply With Quote  
     

  16. #15  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by seagypsy View Post
    after re-reading the op a 6th time i finally see where you DID say it was magnetic. I do think my eyes hate me. how i missed that 5 times i do not know. Had i noticed it, i would not have suggested pumice. oh well, no harm done.(except to my ego)
    No worries
    You've all given me some great leads and I'm sure it will be identified soon enough. All thanks to the people posting in this thread
    Reply With Quote  
     

  17. #16  
    Time Lord Paleoichneum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Washington State, USA
    Posts
    5,374
    Its not a meteorite, the pitting on the surface is air pockets. I would second the vesicular basalt suggestion. The Basalts in the New Jersey/New York region are metal rich and slight magnetism is to be expected.
    If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world. -Thorin Oakenshield

    The needs of the many outweigh the need of the few - Spock of Vulcan & Sentinel Prime of Cybertron ---proof that "the needs" are in the eye of the beholder.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  18. #17  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Apocalyptic Paradise
    Posts
    6,613
    Quote Originally Posted by mmjwski View Post
    You've all given me some great leads
    Yes, just hook them up to the rock and measure the resistance.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  19. #18  
    Forum Ph.D.
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    984
    As am amature I would suggest that there are a couple things you could do to get precise data about your rock. One would be get an accurate density using the archmedian method. Test it for hardness with scratch tests. Does it react to acid or basic solutions? you have already tested for magnetic qualities. All that being said it looks a lot like a bit of cooled and aged lava. I recently spent a month in Hawaii and note that the lava flows can be dated by their color, it is coal black when fresh, but becomes browner as it weathers, eventualy degrading to a red soil.
    Reply With Quote  
     

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 27
    Last Post: July 1st, 2013, 08:16 AM
  2. Replies: 6
    Last Post: May 9th, 2013, 08:45 AM
  3. "Dating" posts split from "Purpose of life" thread
    By Christopher Ball in forum Pseudoscience
    Replies: 155
    Last Post: October 16th, 2011, 05:37 AM
  4. "Dating" posts split from "Purpose of life" thread
    By Christopher Ball in forum Earth Sciences
    Replies: 90
    Last Post: October 11th, 2011, 10:35 AM
  5. Help identify this "rock"
    By jakotaco in forum Earth Sciences
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: October 14th, 2010, 03:15 PM
Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •