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Thread: Ways to die?

  1. #1 Ways to die? 
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    Hi all,

    What geophysical phenomenon would most likely see us all dead? Personally I think it would have to be meteorite impact, statistically it's probably the most realistic threat to humanity at 1/200 in your child's lifetime. Sure earthquakes can do damage, but that's too local. Super volcano? Yeah it would be bad, but I still think that some people would survive. Global warming: tsunamis, landslips, crop failure, disease; yeah that would be pretty bad - but is that purely geophysical? Hmmmmm............ how else could we all die?


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  3. #2  
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    Why do you ask? :wink:


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  4. #3  
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    morbid fascination/boredom
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    Why not just go and buy a big vacuum pump, a high pressure tank and start sucking up the atmosphere? - They'll never know where it's going!
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  6. #5 Re: Ways to die? 
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    Quote Originally Posted by billiards
    Hi all,

    What geophysical phenomenon would most likely see us all dead? Personally I think it would have to be meteorite impact, statistically it's probably the most realistic threat to humanity at 1/200 in your child's lifetime. Sure earthquakes can do damage, but that's too local. Super volcano? Yeah it would be bad, but I still think that some people would survive. Global warming: tsunamis, landslips, crop failure, disease; yeah that would be pretty bad - but is that purely geophysical? Hmmmmm............ how else could we all die?

    personally i cant see the meteorite impact odds being that high. where was this figure taken from? in my kids lifetime of say 85years for example the chances of a extinction size meteorite must be in the millions to 1. Apart from the common ones like war,disease and global warming issues(which could cover loads of areas like crop failure etc) the one id be quite concerned with would be super volcano


    If you look in the yellowstone park in the states, theres our biggest global threat, a massive super volcano where the whole of the national park sits inside and its obviously got alot going on because of the geothermal activity that its famous for geysers, hot springs etc etc

    From what i understand if that one goes its gonna be a good few years without sunlight globally as well as the amount of crap it also sends up into the atmosphere which is pretty scary

    But honestly i thing we have more chance from disease or man :-D
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    Super volcano. It's not a question of IF it will happen, but WHEN. So yeah, no chance of escaping that.
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    Okay, I'll confess all to the meisters of science (I made that 1/200 stat up on the spot), but I'll also say thet the meteorite is perhaps the most realistic threat to civilisation. I have incorporated thine fine self to the possibilities of our final demise, and I shall tell thee that the meteorite is the most likely within this lifetime. My source? I am the young fool that is the student to a certain highly respected professor in the field of geophysical hazards, without name dropping I'll say he's the guy that predicted the boxinday asian tsunami - I borrow these numbers (although I can't remember their absolute value I remember their significance) from a so-called "expert" directly.
    Monkey dried toenails, the supervolcano is a threat, however it is only about one hundredth as likely to be a killer as the meteor. Yellowstone, jeez, at least it's on the otherside of the world (I'm English ). I think that we will hack it as a species, yeah it's inevitable, and no we'll never be completely ready for it, but I still think that the species will survive.
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    im not scared. batter's up...
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    Matron! - a clean pair of trousers if you please.................
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    Global warming?
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  12. #11  
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    Quote Originally Posted by billiards
    Monkey dried toenails, the supervolcano is a threat, however it is only about one hundredth as likely to be a killer as the meteor. Yellowstone, jeez, at least it's on the otherside of the world (I'm English ). I think that we will hack it as a species, yeah it's inevitable, and no we'll never be completely ready for it, but I still think that the species will survive.
    You're wrong in thinking you're safe due to your location. There is more than one "super volcano" on the planet, and if the eruption of Yellowstone doesn't set off a chain reaction, I'll be surprised.

    Either way, the sun will blot out, animals will mostly die, plants *WILL NOT* grow more often than not, most water (even underground) will inevitably be poisoned, it's very similar to a nuclear winter.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_winter
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supervolcano

    Also, given the fact that humans and creatures are less resistant due to the lack of a severely harsh environment present in those days, and the fact most humans are so fat/weak they can't even walk a mile, I think that we're pretty much doomed.

    Even if a choice few live, the odds against them and the odds against ever rebuilding civilization due to the limited resources make it nearly impossible. We may be stuck in a perminant stone age before they can even rebuild due to how much we've already squandered most resources to the point of no return (go straight to jail, do not pass go, do not collect $200 ).
    Unless they pull miracles out of their hats and humanity arises better than ever before. But what are the chances of that happening? Judging by how humanity is going so far, the pessimistic view is the best. Humanity is doomed.
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    Quote Originally Posted by billiards
    Okay, I'll confess all to the meisters of science (I made that 1/200 stat up on the spot), but I'll also say thet the meteorite is perhaps the most realistic threat to civilisation. I have incorporated thine fine self to the possibilities of our final demise, and I shall tell thee that the meteorite is the most likely within this lifetime. My source? I am the young fool that is the student to a certain highly respected professor in the field of geophysical hazards, without name dropping I'll say he's the guy that predicted the boxinday asian tsunami - I borrow these numbers (although I can't remember their absolute value I remember their significance) from a so-called "expert" directly.
    Monkey dried toenails, the supervolcano is a threat, however it is only about one hundredth as likely to be a killer as the meteor. Yellowstone, jeez, at least it's on the otherside of the world (I'm English ). I think that we will hack it as a species, yeah it's inevitable, and no we'll never be completely ready for it, but I still think that the species will survive.

    yeah the yellowstone thing effects us all BIG TIME, and we have eruptions on a regular basis from smaller volcanos all the time, kracatoa was big but not that massive and affected global weather for years and cant remember exact figure but i think that for a reletively(compared to super volcano)small eruption it altered global temp by a couple of degrees for years(which is a pretty big deal), Still dont believe the meteor statement unless your proff knows something we dont from studying near earth massive objects, think about the last massive meteor strike that got close to wiping everything out. Man wasn't even around then, so the chances of it coming in the next hundred years is very very remote.
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    I think I saw that the 'yellowstone catastrophy' occurs about every 600,000 years and is about due. All the evidence points to Vocanoes, lightning, earthquakes and most other natural disasters as having been essential ingredients neccessary to produce life. I guess the only thing that can be said is "That which giveth life can also snuff it out!".
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    To answer the original question;
    okay, this is not a geophysical phenomenon...
    and our sun is too small...
    but I would have to go with a supernova.

    Since that won't happen, I guess I'll have to settle for when our sun turns into a red giant.

    cheers!
    "... the polhode rolls without slipping on the herpolhode lying in the invariable plane."
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  16. #15  
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    Quote Originally Posted by william
    To answer the original question;
    okay, this is not a geophysical phenomenon...
    and our sun is too small...
    but I would have to go with a supernova.

    Since that won't happen, I guess I'll have to settle for when our sun turns into a red giant.

    cheers!

    within a childs lifetime? Its been there in a similar state since the formation of the earth and the chances of that going in the next hundred years is pretty remote or...........


    .....Just my luck


    My moneys still on yellowstone, if man dont do it first
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  17. #16  
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    Quote Originally Posted by captaincaveman
    Quote Originally Posted by william
    To answer the original question;
    okay, this is not a geophysical phenomenon...
    and our sun is too small...
    but I would have to go with a supernova.

    Since that won't happen, I guess I'll have to settle for when our sun turns into a red giant.

    cheers!

    within a childs lifetime? Its been there in a similar state since the formation of the earth and the chances of that going in the next hundred years is pretty remote or...........


    .....Just my luck


    My moneys still on yellowstone, if man dont do it first
    Depends on when the child was born I guess...
    but that kid would get more than just a mild sunburn!
    "... the polhode rolls without slipping on the herpolhode lying in the invariable plane."
    ~Footnote in Goldstein's Mechanics, 3rd ed. p. 202
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    Actually, since someone raised the point (caveman?). When was the last meteorite that caused a mass extinction? I could counter by saying, when was the last super volcano that caused a mass extinction. I can't be bothered to look. But I don't think that supervolcanoes are that much more frequent than meteorite impacts (at the devatating scale we are discussing).
    In fact I would hazard a guess that meteorites have been more destructive in the past (post heavy bombardment) to life than supervolcanoes. Indeed, the last metoerite was a while ago (~60Ma?) so I would say its due again, 1/200 in your child's lifetime is not really that high if you think about it. Oh and just in case you didn't know, the astronomers don't have our backs covered completely. Chances are if there was one coming our way they wouldn't spot in time.
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    Quote Originally Posted by billiards
    Oh and just in case you didn't know, the astronomers don't have our backs covered completely. Chances are if there was one coming our way they wouldn't spot in time.
    In time for what?

    Not a lot we would be able to do about it I'm afraid!

    I hope you don't believe all that crap in the films about knocking it off course/splitting it into smaller pieces.

    We'd be f**cked!!
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  20. #19  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Its All Relative
    Quote Originally Posted by billiards
    Oh and just in case you didn't know, the astronomers don't have our backs covered completely. Chances are if there was one coming our way they wouldn't spot in time.
    In time for what?

    Not a lot we would be able to do about it I'm afraid!

    I hope you don't believe all that crap in the films about knocking it off course/splitting it into smaller pieces.

    We'd be f**cked!!
    Far more likely to destroy ourselves don't you all think?
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    Quote Originally Posted by billco
    Far more likely to destroy ourselves don't you all think?
    When the falling piece of heatshield caused the rocket to explode and set off the nuclear device in the atmosphere?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Its All Relative
    Quote Originally Posted by billco
    Far more likely to destroy ourselves don't you all think?
    When the falling piece of heatshield caused the rocket to explode and set off the nuclear device in the atmosphere?
    I'm happy to say the way nuclear weapons are fuzed that cannot happen, they are not armed until close to the target. During the 2nd World War A british aircraft with a huge bomb on board was hit by 'Triple A' it crashed, the huge bomb it had on board did not explode (it was one of those 'bouncing bombs'). I remember when a US bomber carrying live nuclear bombs was lost over Spain/Med[I think] in a huge refuelling explosion and the [4?] weapons it had on board all plummeted earthwards, 1 was located underwater after much fuss. I think it was about 1954-7 but I can't find anything on google.
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    Quote Originally Posted by billco
    Quote Originally Posted by Its All Relative
    Quote Originally Posted by billco
    Far more likely to destroy ourselves don't you all think?
    When the falling piece of heatshield caused the rocket to explode and set off the nuclear device in the atmosphere?
    I'm happy to say the way nuclear weapons are fuzed that cannot happen, they are not armed until close to the target. During the 2nd World War A british aircraft with a huge bomb on board was hit by 'Triple A' it crashed, the huge bomb it had on board did not explode (it was one of those 'bouncing bombs'). I remember when a US bomber carrying live nuclear bombs was lost over Spain/Med[I think] in a huge refuelling explosion and the [4?] weapons it had on board all plummeted earthwards, 1 was located underwater after much fuss. I think it was about 1954-7 but I can't find anything on google.
    While you're probably correct, I'm sure NASA could make such a balls up of it that it would still be possible! :wink:
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    Oh I see, you mean the RTG type thingies, they put in probes, well no problem there, just buy some real-estate next door to G, dub'ya's place, I don't tthink they fly over there!
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    I take it you guys know that the meteorite that killed off the dinosaurs 65million years ago was Pathetic, compared to whatever happened 251milion years ago at the end of the permian period which wiped out over 90% of life on the planet

    They are not sure what caused that, either a long massive volcano or a larger meteorite than wiped out the dinosaurs and nearly wiped life off the planet. The dinosaur one was a lot more selective of its prey(eg many more species made it through)


    I personally dont see a meteor or volcano honestly doing either in the next 85-100 years to be honest though
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    Quote Originally Posted by captaincaveman
    I take it you guys know that the meteorite that killed off the dinosaurs 65million years ago was Pathetic, compared to whatever happened 251milion years ago at the end of the permian period which wiped out over 90% of life on the planet

    They are not sure what caused that, either a long massive volcano or a larger meteorite than wiped out the dinosaurs and nearly wiped life off the planet. The dinosaur one was a lot more selective of its prey(eg many more species made it through)


    I personally dont see a meteor or volcano honestly doing either in the next 85-100 years to be honest though
    Happens about every 60 million years and is due again around next February....
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  27. #26 my opinion 
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    In my opinion we are proberly going to end up knocking the earth of its axis with some weopan or rather. America when they originally released the bombs on horishima weren;t sure wether it would effect the axis of the earth..pretty frightening huh? Or whe'll all become reliant on neuclear power and someones going to plot agains the world and somehow cause a huge reaction causing all of them to melt down....gah how do you spell it its pronounced sher-know-bal....
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  28. #27 Re: my opinion 
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enchanting_lullabye
    In my opinion we are proberly going to end up knocking the earth of its axis with some weopan or rather. America when they originally released the bombs on horishima weren;t sure wether it would effect the axis of the earth..pretty frightening huh? Or whe'll all become reliant on neuclear power and someones going to plot agains the world and somehow cause a huge reaction causing all of them to melt down....gah how do you spell it its pronounced sher-know-bal....

    from what i understand, when they set off the first nuclear bomb they wern't 100% sure it wasn't goinging to ignite the atmosphere in a chain reaction

    chernobyl was a nightmare, as was 3mile island, its a worry if these get a terrorist attack on them, especially where theres massive population nearby, chernobyl was bad enough and that had massive areas between towns
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  29. #28 ohhh 
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    Okay. I herd from my science teacher about the axis thing, he may not have been entirely correct about it.

    but I know somthing like chain linked nueclear meltdowns would like basically kill of a hell of a lot of people and ensure that there was going to be little chance of survival for anyone left over. so yes..if that happens were all screwed..even Aus has a neuclear power plant now and they want to build more...not good...
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  30. #29 Re: my opinion 
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    Quote Originally Posted by captaincaveman
    from what i understand, when they set off the first nuclear bomb they wern't 100% sure it wasn't goinging to ignite the atmosphere in a chain reaction
    I think it was the first Hydrogen bomb that applied to, when they tested them in the ocean, on old ships.
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    Will a Super Volcano affect my asthma, and should I start stockpiling inhalers
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  32. #31 Re: my opinion 
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    Quote Originally Posted by billco
    Quote Originally Posted by captaincaveman
    from what i understand, when they set off the first nuclear bomb they wern't 100% sure it wasn't goinging to ignite the atmosphere in a chain reaction
    I think it was the first Hydrogen bomb that applied to, when they tested them in the ocean, on old ships.

    yeah, think it did apply to the very first, but what gets me is they had these thoughts and then went F*ck it and did it anyway
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    heres a scenario - with over population, all the fresh water will be used up, or dried up in some parts of the world with desertification happening here n there, what we will be left with is stagnant river water - stagnant from human waste which will spread disease. then there is the sea which water will be filtered and used which will in turn dry up in a few hundred years and cause war not against nations but a war against coastal n inland inhabitants...by which time we all would have died of thirst or disease! hehe unlkely but imagine
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  34. #33  
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrNeedles
    heres a scenario - with over population, all the fresh water will be used up, or dried up in some parts of the world with desertification happening here n there, what we will be left with is stagnant river water - stagnant from human waste which will spread disease. then there is the sea which water will be filtered and used which will in turn dry up in a few hundred years and cause war not against nations but a war against coastal n inland inhabitants...by which time we all would have died of thirst or disease! hehe unlkely but imagine
    With rising sea levels the coastline would move inland, desalinization is not a realistic option for fresh water production on the kind of scale you're imagining (without some kind of technological breakthrough). If it stops raining then yes, your fresh water will eventually run out - but although this will be a problem in large parts of the world it wouldn't effect everywhere. You'd see migration to some of the more fertile places like Syberia, possibly a war or two along the way, but I think that this alone would not cause the extinction of the human race.
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    i know, i was just dreaming....u know, not too clued up on earth sciences but with issues some of us have brought up in this forum, it would cause the population to decrease until hopefully we are below the carrying capacity and are in a state of stability and living in harmony in with the environment! do u think it is possible?
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    Would it be technically feasable with todays technology (but not today's religion politics and economy) to survive a large-term extinction event as a human race?

    One piece of thought I might put out there is that "WE" are also a large extinction event on 12 to 16 billion legs.

    And finally have we evolved to the point that we can actually become independant and free of standard naturalistic natural selection and influence our own survival?

    While an impact would destroy all beings where the impact occured, The fact that we exist today - after numerous other impacts have occured - has shown that the biosphere of life hasn't ever been completley wiped out, just dramatically changed on occasion. Perhaps such an extinction event could be reduced in impact to our species by using geneticly altered plants, creating hydroponic environments and so on... creating a comfortable environment for ourselves, much like we do anyway. (whens the last time you spent a night outside under a tree, or in a cave without even a tent for cover... yeh, you don't do it because the human body doesn't actually like it much.) We are so used to bringing the environment we like with us that we forget it isn't the natural one sometimes. We are already not living "in" nature.

    However there are no other animals before us that were capable of changing the environment to such a degree as us. We have the capacity to create ways to bring the environment of our choice with us. Cos hey, 6 billion plus individuals can do quite alot... especially with Machines helping us too. We can live in Antarctica for months on end. Heck we can even live in space in orbit bringing everything including our own heat, food, water, AIR... and then live in this thing for over a year without gravity.


    As for extinction events, It'd take more than a Jurassic-class extinction event to kill humans off I fear... unless we find some real cool way of killing ourselves that is which is certainly very possible. Is it possible that We can be the catalyst of extinction ourselves? In our search to bring our favourite environments with us wherever we are, we seem to be changing the natural environment on a global scale.Even now we are making species extinct, even by trying not to. Perhaps scientists in 3 million years will be arguing about why life now seemed to die off when no obvious naturally occurring extinction catalysts existed. Of course they could also be historians talking about how mankind saved itself from extinction to become the most hardy race ever to evolve off this planet, able to even survive the complete distruction of the planet itself. A species which outlived it's home... Or the species which stupidly killed itself?
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    1.defcon (korea and c.o.)

    2.
    in 40years there will be on (buyable) oli on earth.
    When the oil is all pumped into the air we will mostprobaly have no viehcles* and a problem with globalwarming at the same time.
    our whole trading structure will collapse, no airplanes no cars*
    and if then the Yellow stone errupts, we are doomed.(it even tops defcon)


    *An electric car was made with the same energie kosts as oil.
    It has even existed on streets.Only the oil company, Bush c.o.
    still have to make 150$billion with oil and destroy the electric car (buy them from users and then destroy them). It may be that allot of people will die in the near future because of this
    I haven't come to fight my word, but to find the truth.
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  38. #37  
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    Quote Originally Posted by miomaz
    in 40years there will be on (buyable) oli on earth.
    Inum plebini anustra dei carrunth istdel nan oli demalipise?
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    I went to a lecture about gas hydrates, these things exist as solids beneath ice sheets, in permafrost, and beneath oceanic sediment...... there are various mechanisms that could trigger catastrophic release of these gas hydrates that would make anthropogenic global warming seem completely insignificant. Substantial release would trigger what has been buzz-phrased "super global warming", actually I think the release of gas hydrates would be caused by significant changes in deep water temperature, which in turn could be caused by carbon emmissions by fuel consumption, so in a way it's just a late stage in the hypothesized climate evolution. A strong enough meteorite would trigger their release almost immediately........
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    Quote Originally Posted by Megabrain
    Quote Originally Posted by miomaz
    in 40years there will be on (buyable) oli on earth.
    Inum plebini anustra dei carrunth istdel nan oli demalipise?
    yo.
    ---sounds french
    I haven't come to fight my word, but to find the truth.
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    Aliens, who buried deadly weapons under the earth millions of years ago, will activate those machines using something that appears like lighting. They go into the machines in that streak of light. These machines are huge tripods, taller than skyscrapers. The aliens will walk around the earth in these tripods killing every one one by one. Not even our best military weapons will save us. By then, tom cruise will be to old to help. We will all persih.
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  42. #41  
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    Quote Originally Posted by queperknuckle
    Aliens, who buried deadly weapons under the earth millions of years ago, will activate those machines using something that appears like lighting. They go into the machines in that streak of light. These machines are huge tripods, taller than skyscrapers. The aliens will walk around the earth in these tripods killing every one one by one. Not even our best military weapons will save us. By then, tom cruise will be to old to help. We will all persih.
    What utter rubbish! everybody knows the aliens will get stuck in all that gum on the sidewalk after which we merely have to feed them a Mac Triple Burger & Fries and watch them die a horrible obeastly death... 8)
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  43. #42  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Megabrain
    Quote Originally Posted by queperknuckle
    Aliens, who buried deadly weapons under the earth millions of years ago, will activate those machines using something that appears like lighting. They go into the machines in that streak of light. These machines are huge tripods, taller than skyscrapers. The aliens will walk around the earth in these tripods killing every one one by one. Not even our best military weapons will save us. By then, tom cruise will be to old to help. We will all persih.
    What utter rubbish! everybody knows the aliens will get stuck in all that gum on the sidewalk after which we merely have to feed them a Mac Triple Burger & Fries and watch them die a horrible obeastly death... 8)
    Incorrect! KFC is much more lethal!
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  44. #43  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeremyhfht
    Quote Originally Posted by Megabrain
    Quote Originally Posted by queperknuckle
    Aliens, who buried deadly weapons under the earth millions of years ago, will activate those machines using something that appears like lighting. They go into the machines in that streak of light. These machines are huge tripods, taller than skyscrapers. The aliens will walk around the earth in these tripods killing every one one by one. Not even our best military weapons will save us. By then, tom cruise will be to old to help. We will all persih.
    What utter rubbish! everybody knows the aliens will get stuck in all that gum on the sidewalk after which we merely have to feed them a Mac Triple Burger & Fries and watch them die a horrible obeastly death... 8)
    Incorrect! KFC is much more lethal!
    LOL!
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