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Thread: What material has these PROPERTIES? <------------------

  1. #1 What material has these PROPERTIES? <------------------ 
    Forum Freshman jagoman's Avatar
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    Hi,

    Im Jago (15). Im doing an over summer project, and need to do some tests. I would be very thankful if anyone could help me.



    Test includes the following items:

    - see-through glass nearly full of water
    - a wooden stick with a rubber end




    The problem is that I need a small material or object that can do the following:

    - float on the surface of the water
    - attach itself to the stick (either wooden part or rubber) when it comes in contact with it
    - detach from the stick when it is sub-merged under water, and float back to the top




    Does anyone know of any material or particals or things that can perform those mentioned features? Ideally non-disovlable, but not strictly so.

    THANKS


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  3. #2  
    Forum Freshman jagoman's Avatar
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    Anyone?


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  4. #3  
    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
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    Can you be a little more specific about the experiment you are doing? What is that you are trying to accomplish? With a little more detail about the experiment, I might be able to help you.
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  5. #4 Re: What material has these PROPERTIES? <---------------- 
    Forum Freshman jagoman's Avatar
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    Well I need to find a thing that can float on water, which is small (lets say a mm in width and height, or close), if you were to dip a stick with a rubbery end into the water, this thing(s) would stick (attach itself) to the rubber, and sink with it, until finally detaching itself (maybe due to the surronding water) and float itself to the top.

    The experiment is to study the actions of water against other entities.

    Sorry if I still haven't made myself clear. But I really need help
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  6. #5  
    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
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    Hmmm...i've got those "Macgyver" gears in my brain working...Let me see if i'm clear on what your trying to do. We'll call the mystery substance "X"

    In a cup of water, you sprinkle some "x" which floats at the top. Using a wooden stick with a rubber end (like a pencil?) you stir in mixture, and the "x" begins to cling to the eraser. You then drop the pencil in the water, the particles of "x" cling to the eraser, at the bottom of the cup for a short time, but then unbond from the eraser and float back up to the top.

    Is this what your trying to do...or have I missed something? I can't really think of anything that would naturally stick to rubber, then unstick, but I'll keep thinking.
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  7. #6  
    Forum Freshman jagoman's Avatar
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    Thanks for the examination, I changed some of your words to suit how I want the situation to be.
    \/

    In a cup of water, you sprinkle some "x" which floats at the top. Using a wooden stick with a rubber end (like a pencil) you dip it in the water (not stirring), and the "x" begins to cling to the eraser. You then dip the pencil in the water deeper (but slowly to not effect x's attachment), the particles of "x" continue to cling to the eraser, but then eventually unbond from the eraser and float back up to the top.


    THANKS
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  8. #7  
    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
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    can you add anything sticky (like a water based glue) to the eraser, or does it have to stick naturally?
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  9. #8  
    Forum Freshman jagoman's Avatar
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    Natuarally is better, because the process should be repeatable. But if it can be repeated again and again with another coating around the rubber, then its good too.

    Sorry for late reply went to sleep (in england) :P
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  10. #9  
    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
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    Hmmm...still thinking.
    I was really bored last night, and thought about your experiment. I got my nickname "MacGyver" because I'm a pretty good trouble-shooter, and I'd really like to help you lick this problem. Here was my train of thought:

    What makes stuff stick to other stuff:
    static electricity : Don't think this would work because water would discharge any built up charge.
    chemical bond: Using glue or other materials might work, but I cant think of anything that would remain sticky in water, that wouldn't bond permanently.
    magnetic attraction: Most magnetic materials don't float.

    Was this exact experiment given to you by the teacher, or were you assigned a more broad goal, and you came up with this? It seems to me, they would keep things pretty basic for high school science class, using materials that are readily available.

    A few more questions:
    What class is this for, and what scientific principle is this experiment supposed to show in action (i.e. surface tension, density etc.)

    Are you allowed to modifiy the experiment? Maybe we could come up with a different way to show this principle.

    If you could, please post the exact, word for word assignment from your teacher, that might help.

    Keep your chin up, we'll whip this thing yet! 8)
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  11. #10  
    Forum Freshman jagoman's Avatar
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    Thanks for the interesting response. I have thought a little about the electical charge attraction, as well as the chemical bond and magnetic attraction, but is there a possible bond made with air bubbles? for example if our 'x' was a light thin metal, in MESH form, do you think the small bubbles found in the holes would hold the entire material to another object (i.e. the rubber)

    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968
    Was this exact experiment given to you by the teacher, or were you assigned a more broad goal, and you came up with this?
    Close, well this is a study into the actions of water against other entities, and as you guessed I came up with this idea, I have already given my choice to my teacher but still dont want to change the experiment, even if it will not be a success. I think its a kool test, my brothers helping me with it too, his not as good tho lol

    What class is this for
    Its an over summer study for a later assignment on the same subject. The class is part of my science unit.

    Are you allowed to modifiy the experiment? Maybe we could come up with a different way to show this principle.
    If it is the last option, then yes it can be altered, but I'd prefer not to :P

    BTW thanks for your help, VERY grateful!!! What you think of the bubble concept?
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  12. #11  
    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
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    Speaking of bubbles...you can always just drop a roll of "mentos" in a 2 liter bottle of "diet coke" and yell "It's magic!!"...but I'm sure as soon as your teacher finished wiping off his face, he would inform you that you failed.

    Anyhoo...back to the experiment,

    The metal mesh wouldn't float, and I'm not sure if the surface tension would be great enough to form a bond.

    A little help from the other members of this forum would be nice! (hello?...<tapping microphone>...is this thing on?)
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  13. #12  
    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
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    I guess no one has any ideas
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  14. #13  
    Forum Freshman jagoman's Avatar
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    how about starting from the very begining-

    so what is something that will float and is able to attach itself to something else (or vise versa)?

    Anyone? MacGyver? lol
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  15. #14  
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    A Tea Leaf
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  16. #15  
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    How about using two pieces of metal. Stick one piece into something that floats (a styrofoam ball for example)and magnetize the other piece and stick that one on the other thing (your wooden stick).
    When the styrofoam ball is submerged its boyancy should overcome the magnetic attraction.
    Should work, needs just a bit of balancing the forces.

    PS. Shouldn't this thread be in under Experimentation topic?
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