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Thread: Is there carbon in pine bark?

  1. #1 Is there carbon in pine bark? 
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    I know there is carbon in sapwood. And if you use it as mulch, as the carbon breaks down it takes nitrogen from the soil. Thus wood chips don't make good mulch. Unless it's well aged. Do I have this right? And is there carbon in bark? Thanks. Filix.


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  3. #2  
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    There is carbon in everything organic. That is the definition of organic, so there is carbon in pine bark.

    When the bark breaks down, it will take nitrogen from the soil. However, the break down is slower than with pine chips, since the bark contains tannins and resins which act to slow the action of decomposing organisms. Slower decomposition means slower loss of nitrogen.

    I would suggest you feel free to use pine bark as mulch. I do, and it works very well. If you are worried about nitrogen, just add a bit of fertiliser. Even pee on the pine bark, since urine contains lots of nitrogen.


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  4. #3  
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    Quote Originally Posted by filix View Post
    I know there is carbon in sapwood. And if you use it as mulch, as the carbon breaks down it takes nitrogen from the soil. Thus wood chips don't make good mulch. Unless it's well aged. Do I have this right? And is there carbon in bark? Thanks. Filix.
    Yes, Yes there is.
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  5. #4  
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    I often spread nitrogen while gazing at the sky at 3 AM
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  6. #5  
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    Oh shtt! Lol. I spread it too . 3 AM? I'm zzzzzzzzzzzz Filix
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  7. #6  
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    When organics " like pine bark, pine needels, oak leaves ect.... Start out acidic. As they break down to they tend to become less acidic and return to neutral? Filix.
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  8. #7  
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    Acidic?

    If you're talking pine, absolutely. Have a look at the first page of this. Landscape Mulch - How Do You Select the Proper Type?

    The general rule is if pH at the surface is your concern, compost or at least age the mulch material before applying it. If you have a regular or large source of just one kind of material, pre-aging or composting is a very, very good idea. You really don't want to turn your soil into the kind of stuff you find on the floor of a conifer forest unless you're a rhododendron or azalea addict.

    And remember there are other issues. The resins in mulched eucalytus can turn the surface hydrophobic. Not the best result if you want the mulch to retain moisture rather than repel it.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
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  9. #8  
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    I use fresh pine park for mulch on my blueberries. They love it sour. But just as this link points out, even things that start acidic become neutral. I wasn't sure, but now I am. I would here people giving others advice about how to make their soil adidic. They would tell them.. just put lots of oak leaves or pine needels or coffee grounds as mulch and that will make the soild very adidic for your blueberries. I didn't think they were right. Blueberries need things like sulfur, peat moss. Thankyou adelady. filix.
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  10. #9  
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    I use shredded paper as mulch in my vegtable garden. Since paper is wood pulp I would expect to need to fertilize regularly to replace nitrates used in decomposing the paper. Am i correct? Do I also need to add lime?
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  11. #10  
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    use shredded paper as mulch in my vegtable garden. Since paper is wood pulp I would expect to need to fertilize regularly to replace nitrates used in decomposing the paper. Am i correct? Do I also need to add lime?
    A handful or two of blood and bone or a splash of fish emulsion should do the trick. Shouldn't need lime unless your soil is acid to start with (or you overdo it on the nitrogen.)
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
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