Notices
Results 1 to 31 of 31
Like Tree5Likes
  • 1 Post By marnixR
  • 1 Post By MeteorWayne
  • 1 Post By NorthernIowaPanther
  • 1 Post By HectorDecimal
  • 1 Post By HectorDecimal

Thread: Yellowstone caldera erruption.

  1. #1 Yellowstone caldera erruption. 
    New Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    2
    Hello,

    I've been thinking about Yellowstone Caldera, i do believe that an eruption is comming in the near future (i'm no believer of 2012 so it has nothing to do with that)
    it usually errupts every 600 000 years, the last one was 640 000 years ago.
    Since the caldera is only a few miles beneath the surface, i've been thinking that perhaps a very large explosion could cause seismic activity and cause an erruption.
    Is there anyone else who thinks it's possible ? or am i to dramatic ?


    kind regards from Belgium,


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    WYSIWYG Moderator marnixR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Cardiff, Wales
    Posts
    5,760
    please remember that "short" in geologic terms could be anything from tomorrow to several thousands of years in the future

    the map below shows the spread of ashfall in previous eruptions
    not many places to hide if you're in the western part of the US - you should be ok in belgium though



    westwind likes this.
    "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away." (Philip K. Dick)
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3 Re: Yellowstone caldera erruption. 
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    14,169
    Quote Originally Posted by AXEL
    Since the caldera is only a few miles beneath the surface, i've been thinking that perhaps a very large explosion could cause seismic activity and cause an erruption.
    Is there anyone else who thinks it's possible ? or am i to dramatic ?
    Hi Axel,
    I'm not sure what you mean. Are you suggesting that a large, artificial explosion near the caldera could start am earthquake that would weaken the crust singificantly so that Yellowstone could erupt?

    If so, this would only likely have any effect if the eruption were already very close. In that case it might advance it by a year or two. In other cases the energy release from any practical explosive device would not likely be enough to produce any permanent effect.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Forum Isotope Bunbury's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    2,590
    Is a series of 3 events separated by 700,000 and 670,000 years enough to show periodicity? Is a period difference of 30,000 years "near clockwork timing"? What does the reference to zircon and quartz data mean? Just asking.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Forum Sophomore
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    127
    Quote Originally Posted by Bunbury
    Is a series of 3 events separated by 700,000 and 670,000 years enough to show periodicity?
    Because of the working hypothesis behind the Yellowstone hotspot, in a loose sense, yes; this hotspot track has a history of 10-15 million years, IIRC.

    Is a period difference of 30,000 years "near clockwork timing"?
    Geologically-speaking, yes.


    What does the reference to zircon and quartz data mean? Just asking.
    I'm not sure; the two minerals are generally used to answer different kinds of questions, so one would have to browse the literature to find out (one of the big problems of not including references).
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    14,169
    Isotope ratios and minor element geochemistry can reveal details of parent magma composition and history. Couple this with growing understanding of the evolution of magmatic provinces. My understanding is that this is a fast growing field, with several techniques evolving and being proven over the last decade. (My knowledge of the concepts if wholly superficial and doubtless less than I have implied by the above statements.)
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7 Re: Yellowstone caldera erruption. 
    New Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by Ophiolite
    Quote Originally Posted by AXEL
    Since the caldera is only a few miles beneath the surface, i've been thinking that perhaps a very large explosion could cause seismic activity and cause an erruption.
    Is there anyone else who thinks it's possible ? or am i to dramatic ?
    Hi Axel,
    I'm not sure what you mean. Are you suggesting that a large, artificial explosion near the caldera could start am earthquake that would weaken the crust singificantly so that Yellowstone could erupt?

    If so, this would only likely have any effect if the eruption were already very close. In that case it might advance it by a year or two. In other cases the energy release from any practical explosive device would not likely be enough to produce any permanent effect.
    thanks for the answer Ophiolite that was indeed what i ment, that the erruption could be advanced by a very large explosion
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #8  
    Comet Dust Collector Moderator
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    New Jersey, USA
    Posts
    2,848
    Related:

    WASHINGTON—Geophysicists have made the first large-scale picture of the electrical conductivity of the gigantic underground plume of hot and partly molten rock that feeds the Yellowstone supervolcano. The image suggests that the plume beneath the volcanically active area—renowned today for geysers and hot springs—is even bigger than it appears in earlier images made with earthquake waves.

    “It’s like comparing ultrasound and MRI in the human body; they are different imaging technologies,” says geophysics Professor Michael Zhdanov of the University of Utah in Salt Lake City. Zhdanov is principal author of the new study and an expert on measuring magnetic and electrical fields on Earth’s surface to find oil, gas, minerals and geologic structures underground.

    “It’s a totally new and different way of imaging and looking at the volcanic roots of Yellowstone,” says study co-author Robert B. Smith, professor emeritus and research professor of geophysics, also at University of Utah, and a coordinating scientist of the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory.

    In the past 2 million years, three eruptions at Yellowstone have been huge, belching enough volcanic ash to cover half of North America. The new study says nothing about the chances of another cataclysmic caldera (giant crater) eruption at Yellowstone, but it provides scientists with a valuable, new perspective on the vast and deep reservoir of fiery material that feeds such eruptions.

    The new study has been accepted for publication in Geophysical Research Letters, a journal of the American Geophysical Union, which plans to publish it within the next few weeks.

    -----

    Much More at the link:

    http://www.agu.org/news/press/pr_arc.../2011-16.shtml

    [/img]
    westwind likes this.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #9  
    Forum Freshman tombyers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    13
    I just watched a documentary that showed where lava had erupted in Yellowstone as recently as 100,000 years ago (but not in a super-eruption). Does anybody know if the hot springs and geysers have been active continuously since then, sporadically, or only recently?
    Tom Byers
    Reply With Quote  
     

  11. #10  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope Paleoichneum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Washington State, USA
    Posts
    4,564
    General evidence is for pretty much continual activity since that time
    If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world. -Thorin Oakenshield

    The needs of the many outweigh the need of the few - Spock of Vulcan & Sentinel Prime of Cybertron ---proof that "the needs" are in the eye of the beholder.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  12. #11  
    Geo
    Geo is offline
    Forum Junior
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    273
    My house got done by 7.0 M quake on September 4th, then a 6.4 on Feburary 22nd.

    Were 100km's from a significant plate boundary. 26,000 years ago the Taupo eruption occured with the release of 1000 km (cubed)of material. That's VEI eight. It was the biggest eruption within the last 0.5ma?

    Rocks behave as fluids over time.

    We don't know!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  13. #12  
    Geo
    Geo is offline
    Forum Junior
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    273
    2500km cubed! FarrrrrKKK!

    There's an interesting chapter in Bryson's A Short History of Nearly Everything on this. And a movie too.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  14. #13  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    7
    nothing to worry guys.....just pray and all will gonna be alright....in this nothing is permanent so don't think too much,I dont say don't mine those thing I just say
    happen if what suppose to be happen and nothing gonna change that
    Reply With Quote  
     

  15. #14  
    Forum Freshman dutchie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    11
    this blog is run by a professor of geology, a volcano expert Yellowstone: The public and media obsession with the caldera | Eruptions | Big Think and this link takes you to a recent article on yellowstone. there are many more on his blog on the subject. it's a great blog to follow, a little while ago when the icelandic volcano with the unpronounceable name was in full roar, this blog was where you could find the very latest information, as things happened.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  16. #15  
    Reptile Dysfunction drowsy turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    2,256
    Quote Originally Posted by cookie View Post
    just pray and all will gonna be alright....
    If yellowstone erupts, you sit and pray while I try to reach safety. We'll see which plan works best.
    "The major difference between a thing that might go wrong and a thing that cannot possibly go wrong is that when a thing that cannot possibly go wrong goes wrong it usually turns out to be impossible to get at or repair." ~ Douglas Adams
    Reply With Quote  
     

  17. #16  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    5
    In order to get any kind of eruption, you either need to increase the pressure in the magma chamber, or you need to reduce the resistence holding the magma in.

    Now if you could get one of the old cold war fusion bombs in the 200 megaton range, and detonated it on the surface, it might remove enough material, and produce a compression shockwave and rebound that would generate a new eruption. You're unlikely to get a new mega-eruption out of it since the pump isn't primed for one; more like an oozing magma lake similar to Hawaii. And the destruction from the warhead is likely to be greater and farther reaching than the resultant eruption.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  18. #17  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Indiana. Near Indy. On the top of the Eastern "buttcheek."
    Posts
    183
    I have been exploring the possibility that a supervolcano does not errupt like a stratovolcano or shield type volcano. We knbow so little about them that anyone's "best guess" is not completely out of the picture. My thoughts are that the process may be very slow and progressive, very much like taking a pot of water that has the top few centimeters frozen and putting it on the hot burner. The water on the bottom boils first. If we are lucky, and probably will be, the top ice fractures and let's off a lot of steam first and probably a good bit from around the edges.

    This is a speculation, so just another perspective on a question on many minds today scientific and popular. I think, with all the increasing frequencies of solar flares, quakes and now volcanic activity we've seen over the last 40 years especially, there could be a connection to the solar activity of 2002 and 2003 with the Yellowstone Caldera's increased activity in 2002 and 2003, both seismic and from geysers/steam vents. The flares and quakes aren't exactly subsiding. Quite the opposite.

    I speculate more of these vents will be seen perhaps even this year. This may become a runaway phase in less than 10 or 20 years, judging by those recent changes, and we could see the smoke and ash spewing in as little as 25 years. With a lot of continued research, it may be possible to predict accurately what to expect. Regardless, it wouldn't hurt for people to change architecture to protect against such a disaster.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  19. #18  
    Comet Dust Collector Moderator
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    New Jersey, USA
    Posts
    2,848
    Quote Originally Posted by HectorDecimal View Post

    I speculate more of these vents will be seen perhaps even this year. This may become a runaway phase in less than 10 or 20 years, judging by those recent changes, and we could see the smoke and ash spewing in as little as 25 years. With a lot of continued research, it may be possible to predict accurately what to expect. Regardless, it wouldn't hurt for people to change architecture to protect against such a disaster.
    Well, be sure to document when that happens. Meanwhile, I ain't holding my breath, since there is little support for your assertions.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  20. #19  
    New Member NorthernIowaPanther's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Cedar Falls, IA
    Posts
    4
    The lead USGS geologist (Dr. Jake Lowenstern YVO Scientist-in-Charge Jake Lowenstern) at Yellowstone doesn't believe it is going to erupt any time soon due to the level in the magma chamber. If we're talking about recent activity, why does the USGS have Yellowstone under normal activity levels? The park saw increased earthquake activity in 2009 as well as increased uplift since the early 2000s, but nothing has happened. Geological time is also a rough estimate. We're talking +/- 50,000 years at least. That's not a lot in the whole scheme of geological time, but it is in human time. I seriously doubt Yellowstone is going to erupt anywhere near our lifetime.
    westwind likes this.
    ​"Don't take that schist for granite!"
    Reply With Quote  
     

  21. #20  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Indiana. Near Indy. On the top of the Eastern "buttcheek."
    Posts
    183
    Quote Originally Posted by dutchie View Post
    this blog is run by a professor of geology, a volcano expert Yellowstone: The public and media obsession with the caldera | Eruptions | Big Think and this link takes you to a recent article on yellowstone. there are many more on his blog on the subject. it's a great blog to follow, a little while ago when the icelandic volcano with the unpronounceable name was in full roar, this blog was where you could find the very latest information, as things happened.
    That's a good link. The first impact is the satellite view thumbnail.

    What we don't have to compare against is a satellite shot of it in 1600, 1650, 1700 et al. The native "Turtle Islander" or American saw this as a land of evil spirits. I found records of the park back to Jim Bridger in 1823. After that the first written descriptions are around 1870.

    __________________________________________________ __________________

    as for documenting and holding one's breath, I hope to document a change in architecture to fluid dynamic shape, and modern protections taken into the design envisionment if for no other reason than to protect this new age of technology from extinction by stupidity, long before any human living on this planet would ever need to document the catastrophic erruption of what may or may not be a global killer.

    I don't think it is healthy to dismiss any possibility developed around Newtonian mechanics. We've had a lot of people die here in the Mid-West lately from tornadoes and freaky weather. The Sugarland concert here is an example of an unusual act of nature greeted by stupidity. I take my hat off to the people who pitched in right away to help the victims, but there were many who ran. Why would anyone with an ounce of intelligence not see it coming on radar and evacuated long before a storm hits? This just might be what happens at Yellowstone.
    Some will see it and try to warn others. Some will do what they can to pick up the pieces. Some will run in fear.

    I'm certain all will be documented by someone.
    westwind likes this.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  22. #21  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Indiana. Near Indy. On the top of the Eastern "buttcheek."
    Posts
    183
    Quote Originally Posted by NorthernIowaPanther View Post
    The lead USGS geologist (Dr. Jake Lowenstern YVO Scientist-in-Charge Jake Lowenstern) at Yellowstone doesn't believe it is going to erupt any time soon due to the level in the magma chamber. If we're talking about recent activity, why does the USGS have Yellowstone under normal activity levels? The park saw increased earthquake activity in 2009 as well as increased uplift since the early 2000s, but nothing has happened. Geological time is also a rough estimate. We're talking +/- 50,000 years at least. That's not a lot in the whole scheme of geological time, but it is in human time. I seriously doubt Yellowstone is going to erupt anywhere near our lifetime.
    Are they using Doppler imaging to determine the magma chamber's volumetrics? I'd be more concerned about water sources in that area. I am not convinced we know enough to say it won't errupt in the classic sense on December 21st this year. My best guess is that won't happen, but in view of the increased seismic and volcanic activity around the planet escalating over the last decade along with two 10 fold (nominally) increased acceleration in both the magnetic and geomagnetic poles from .005 deg Northward per year in 1900 to .35 degrees per year in 2002 to 2003. It's increasing. In MY lifetime? Well... I'm not planning on dying this year... I hope I'm around to document 25 years of failed predictions. I started documenting pre-mature events Tuesday... that's a different category altogether.
    westwind likes this.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  23. #22  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope Paleoichneum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Washington State, USA
    Posts
    4,564
    The history of eruptions is very well documented and the processes that are involved in such a process are also well understood. Geology and Volcanology are both well developed sciences that have a lot going for them. Fluid mechanics is incorporated in much of the modern Geology and Volcanology, but it is not going to be a defining feature in the amount you are suggesting I dont think.
    If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world. -Thorin Oakenshield

    The needs of the many outweigh the need of the few - Spock of Vulcan & Sentinel Prime of Cybertron ---proof that "the needs" are in the eye of the beholder.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  24. #23  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Indiana. Near Indy. On the top of the Eastern "buttcheek."
    Posts
    183
    Quote Originally Posted by Paleoichneum View Post
    The history of eruptions is very well documented and the processes that are involved in such a process are also well understood. Geology and Volcanology are both well developed sciences that have a lot going for them. Fluid mechanics is incorporated in much of the modern Geology and Volcanology, but it is not going to be a defining feature in the amount you are suggesting I dont think.
    Are you familiar with fracking?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  25. #24  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope Paleoichneum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Washington State, USA
    Posts
    4,564
    yes. are you familiar with the eruptive history of the yellowstone hot spot track?
    If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world. -Thorin Oakenshield

    The needs of the many outweigh the need of the few - Spock of Vulcan & Sentinel Prime of Cybertron ---proof that "the needs" are in the eye of the beholder.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  26. #25  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Indiana. Near Indy. On the top of the Eastern "buttcheek."
    Posts
    183
    Quote Originally Posted by Paleoichneum View Post
    yes. are you familiar with the eruptive history of the yellowstone hot spot track?
    Somewhat. I don't have it memorized. Do you know anything about the basic rock type in that area?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  27. #26  
    New Member NorthernIowaPanther's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Cedar Falls, IA
    Posts
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by HectorDecimal View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Paleoichneum View Post
    yes. are you familiar with the eruptive history of the yellowstone hot spot track?
    Somewhat. I don't have it memorized. Do you know anything about the basic rock type in that area?
    I'm not sure what the original bedrock is, but I know a lot of what is there now is rhyolite. The evidence is that the trees that occupy a lot of the area are the only ones that can grow in it and it's rather impermeable so puddles of water stick around longer and so they see a lot of mosquito activity.
    ​"Don't take that schist for granite!"
    Reply With Quote  
     

  28. #27  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Indiana. Near Indy. On the top of the Eastern "buttcheek."
    Posts
    183
    Rhyolite - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Just so we have a comparison...


    So... lots of quartz ingrained and granite-like. I suppose I'd be wanting to know what is closer to the basement... and the magma channels/chambers.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  29. #28  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Indiana. Near Indy. On the top of the Eastern "buttcheek."
    Posts
    183
    One noticeable trait is that the flow of the erruption seems to head SouthEast, thus, from 10,000 ft down to the gulf.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  30. #29  
    New Member NorthernIowaPanther's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Cedar Falls, IA
    Posts
    4
    My assumption it would be the same due to the crustal composition. It tends to be rhyolite. Just look at Mt. St. Helens.
    ​"Don't take that schist for granite!"
    Reply With Quote  
     

  31. #30  
    Comet Dust Collector Moderator
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    New Jersey, USA
    Posts
    2,848
    Quote Originally Posted by NorthernIowaPanther View Post
    My assumption it would be the same due to the crustal composition. It tends to be rhyolite. Just look at Mt. St. Helens.
    Mt St Helens is an entirely different type of eruption. It's where a plate is going underneath the continent. The Yellowstone hotspot is from a very deep reservoir of magma, and has completely different composition.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  32. #31  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope Paleoichneum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Washington State, USA
    Posts
    4,564
    The yellowstone basements rocks are mainly Precambrian gneiss' and shists
    If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world. -Thorin Oakenshield

    The needs of the many outweigh the need of the few - Spock of Vulcan & Sentinel Prime of Cybertron ---proof that "the needs" are in the eye of the beholder.
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •