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Thread: Is Japan being set up for a 3-Hit Combo, not talkin Nuke...

  1. #1 Is Japan being set up for a 3-Hit Combo, not talkin Nuke... 
    Forum Freshman ThaCrow187's Avatar
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    Hello all Ive been wondering this since its all began,
    But they are only talking about Nuclear meltdowns and this points to a bigger problem then the earthquake, tsunami, and potential catastrofic meltdowns, That Problem is Mt. Fuji. Everything im seing now is an Exact account of what happen in 1707. that quake was a 8.4-8.6 depending on websites you look at, and it was followed by a massive tsunami that also took alot of land with it, but then 2 months later Boom Mt.Fuji blew it's top. Could this be a repeat of history like we are told always repeats itself, and If it does what would that mean to the world not just Japan which would basically GO BROKE as a country if that happens.

    Here's links to info on 1707 quake and Valcano
    http://www.kosmix.com/topic/1707_hoei_earthquake
    http://www.volcanolive.com/fuji.html

    Ty for all answers and insight.


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  3. #2  
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    How do you figure a volcanic eruption would "basically delete" Japan? The one in 1707 wiped out some houses. That's about it.


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    Forum Freshman ThaCrow187's Avatar
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    watch cnn listen to how economically unstable the place is already and how they may not be able to bounce back, what would something thats gonna put another 100billion more do an already finacially tapped country, someones gonna own japan when its all over and it wont be the japanese any more.
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    Forum Freshman Trillian's Avatar
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    General rule of thumb: don't get your science news from CNN.com or any other similar media outlet; go to a reputable scientific news source that will give you facts and figures, not panic and hyperbole.

    But to answer your question, no, the eruption of Mount Fuji will not delete Japan from the planet and it would have the same affect on the rest of the world that all of the other volcanic eruptions have had. I visited Montserrat seven years ago and my tour guide brought me to a cliff overlooking the city of Plymouth, in close and very dangerous proximity to the volcano, and although it leveled the city, the other half of the island was thriving. Montserrat is a dot on the map compared to Japan, so you see my point.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThaCrow187
    watch cnn listen to how economically unstable the place is already.
    That's an odd impression. If anything Japan's economy is marked by too stable--huge savings and little if any growth or contraction.

    Did you have a particular volcano in mind that might be triggered by this event? Any nearby that are "past due," or have been showing signs of becoming unstable prior or since this event?
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    Veracity Vigilante inow's Avatar
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    Japanese debt is quite high. I think that's what he meant. The issue is they will be borrowing more to engage in repair efforts, and there is slight concern over insurance payments. What this argument misses, however, is the huge stimulus effect that rebuild effort will have on the larger economy, and the fact that not many Japanese had earthquake or tsunami insurance, so the payments are not likely to be as high as some think.

    Where things remain more questionable, however, is in areas where high-tech manufacturing takes place. With major players temporarily out of the market for various reasons (lack of power, workers unavailable, fab tools damaged or out of alignment, etc), it leaves a huge window of opportunity for competitors in an already highly competitive industry.


    http://finance.fortune.cnn.com/2011/...bt-crisis-yet/
    Here's a quick look at why people are scrutinizing Japanese sovereign debt. Japan has been able to rack up a massive debt load (expected to hit 228% of GDP this year) by selling JGBs to its own banks, insurance companies, and citizens. These lenders have allowed interest rates to stay at a very affordable near-zero percent. But with a debt so large, even a small increase in interest rates would start to eat up an unsustainable amount of the country's revenues.

    Certainly there's an argument to be made that this situation is unsustainable. According to a report from Standard & Poor's, Japan's aging population will push the institutions that hold the most government debt -- domestic life insurance companies and the Government Pension Investment Fund -- to become net sellers to support pension-related costs.

    The demographic shift will someday force the country to borrow from foreign buyers, who will likely charge higher interest rates that Japan can't afford to pay. And then you have your debt crisis.

    But there are two reasons that the earthquake may not trigger a sharp rise in yields.

    First, the quake is unlikely to force insurance companies to make massive payments for earthquake damage, since only about 18.5% of Japanese households have earthquake insurance,

    <...>

    Second, Japan holds more than 95% of its own debt, according to Bank of Japan data. Even if foreign investors began to unload their bonds, they account for a small part of the overall market.

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-0...ter-quake.html
    Policy makers will need to compile a spending bill “over the medium to long-term” to cope with the aftermath of the 8.9- magnitude earthquake and the tsunami it triggered, Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano told NHK Television. For now, officials will use about 200 billion yen ($2.4 billion) left over from the budget for the fiscal year ending March 31, he said.

    To maintain financial stability, Bank of Japan Governor Masaaki Shirakawa said the central bank will provide “massive” liquidity.

    <...>

    “This is a Keynesian stimulus program that nobody can argue with: just rebuilding the city of Sendai,” said Marcus Noland, deputy director of the Peterson Institute for International Economics in Washington
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