Notices
Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Sundial question

  1. #1 Sundial question 
    New Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    1
    Hello everyone,

    I'm not sure if this is the right place to ask but I was wondering what happens to a sundial when the clocks go back? I am an Interactive Design student looking for an answer. If anyone can help me out/point me into the right way, that would be greatly appreciated

    Thank you very much


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Forum Ph.D. Leszek Luchowski's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Gliwice, Poland
    Posts
    807
    In the good old days when sundials were the principal way of telling the time, rather than being just patio decorations, Daylight Saving Time was unknown. "The time" meant just the local solar time.

    Nowadays, you can try rotating your sundial to adjust it, unless of course it is too heavy or cemented to the ground.

    Or replace the numbers cut in stone with small LCD displays that will show the correct hour for every notch, switching it from, say, "5" to "4" when the time is changed. I wonder if anyone is making the equivalent of 7-segment digits for Roman numerals.


    Leszek. Pronounced [LEH-sheck]. The wondering Slav.
    History teaches us that we don't learn from history.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Time Lord
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    5,338
    Quote Originally Posted by Leszek Luchowski
    Nowadays, you can try rotating your sundial to adjust it, unless of course it is too heavy or cemented to the ground.
    Actually, if the angle of the sundial's gnomon is set for a different latitude then rotation isn't enough. Sundials bought for garden ornament in Canada may be found calibrated to work perfectly outside the factory in Southern China.
    A pong by any other name is still a pong. -williampinn
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Moderator Moderator
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    8,324
    True enough. Though it's pretty easy to compensate by adjusting the angle of the base by the difference in latitude.
    Meteorologist/Naturalist & Retired Soldier
    “The Holy Land is everywhere” Black Elk
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •