Notices
Results 1 to 24 of 24

Thread: digging to the core of earth

  1. #1 digging to the core of earth 
    New Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    1
    Hi people

    me and my friends are arguing, if it is possible to drill a hole into the earth core. We donīt care about economics and stuff, the only thing we argue about is the level of human knowledge needed to do this, and if the mankind already has technology to complete this task.

    Thanks for your opinions.


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard SkinWalker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Grand Prairie, TX
    Posts
    2,377
    I don't think it would be possible to lubricate a set of bits much further than the middle crust just because of the distance.

    Problems would be the heat and distance from the Earth's surface. I would think the further you drill, the more likelihood you have of damaging the bit set since you're essentially trying to transmit the energy required to do the work over many meters.]

    The heat would also complicate things. At 200+ degrees F metal bits and rigging would become fatigued. I would assume that some sort of lubrication like clay would need to be used and this would quickly dry.


    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard spuriousmonkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    2,193
    I would worry more about the 7000K at the core.

    And the viscous nature of many of the layers. Can you really dig into a viscous layer?
    "Kill them all and let God sort them out."

    - Arnaud Amalric

    http://spuriousforums.com/index.php
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope skeptic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    4,843
    Also the pressure.

    I do not have the figures, but I doubt a set of drill casings could stand the pressure more than 10 to 20 kms down. The whole thing would collapse, and this would be assisted by the ultra high temperatures, which makes metals soft and plastic.

    The lubrication fluids that are pumped into the casings would have to be pumped at a pressure greater than the pressure of rock pressing in. That would soon become impossible, because the pressure is just so enormous.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    20
    no, liquid core.

    even if we could get that far it would be like drilling through water :\
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope Paleoichneum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Washington State, USA
    Posts
    4,625
    Quote Originally Posted by roflwaffle123
    no, liquid core.

    even if we could get that far it would be like drilling through water :\
    ummm, you mean liquid mantle and liquid outer core right? and it prob would be more like very hot molasses.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    20
    Quote Originally Posted by Paleoichneum
    Quote Originally Posted by roflwaffle123
    no, liquid core.

    even if we could get that far it would be like drilling through water :\
    ummm, you mean liquid mantle and liquid outer core right? and it prob would be more like very hot molasses.
    you get the point....
    I'm a refugee from /sci/
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #8  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    36
    The large pressure near the center of the earth would cause a greater friction than on the surface, so any lubrication problems are multipied.
    Because of the large frictional torque and the length of the drill bit, it would break easily.
    And there is the theory that the inner core does not rotate with the rest of earth. Not easy to drill in something that keeps moving.

    About the drilling in the mantle and outer core, do you even need to drill through liquid? More like poke through?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #9  
    Time Lord
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    5,338
    Quote Originally Posted by Mole
    do you even need to drill through liquid?
    Right. And do you need to drill where crust is normal thickness? There are hotspots on Earth where magma nears surface and occasionally breaches it.

    Idea: Use US Navy "earth-penetrating" bombs to open an existing hotspot in Hawaii. Then drop in a machine built entirely of heavy metals (e.g. uranium). The machine will sink...
    A pong by any other name is still a pong. -williampinn
    Reply With Quote  
     

  11. #10  
    Geo
    Geo is offline
    Forum Junior
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    273
    It would take a very long time anyhow. It took 19 years to drill 12,262m on Russia's Kola Peninsula.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  12. #11  
    Forum Ph.D. Dave Wilson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Cumbria UK
    Posts
    893
    Looking at this stuff off Wikipedia, it does not seem possible at this moment in time to drill a hole to the Earth`s core.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kola_Superdeep_Borehole
    Latinos are Republican. They just don't know it yet.
    Ronald Reagan
    Reply With Quote  
     

  13. #12  
    Forum Sophomore
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    127
    Definitely not possible. Definitely not even possible to drill to mid-crust because rock in the brittle-ductile zone will deform into the borehole as you drill it!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  14. #13  
    Forum Junior
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    223
    If we really wanted to cool the globe, a gradual ventilation program might work out providing we go through to the other side. But think of the air pressure we would have at the center. How much of our atmosphere would have gone below ground considering all that compression? What a rocket-launching setup it might give us. It would be tough to drain if seawater seeped in. On the other hand, if our micro black holes await at the center, the seven seas could just go right down and free up lots of dry land up here. Lets go for it!
    "Believe nothing, no matter where you read it, or who said it, no matter if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense." --Buddha (563BC-483BC)
    Reply With Quote  
     

  15. #14  
    Forum Bachelors Degree Apopohis Reject's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    489
    To my way of reasoning, what we would discover if we were somehow able to locate ourself at the earth's core, would be a major surprise to most people. For we would not be looking at a molten mass in the process of cooling - the distant aftereffects of some fiery bang of enormous bigness after all.

    Rather, what we would be gazing upon, would be an ongoing genetic process in which rock and everything else that we recognise as being 'physical' in relation to this planet, is being created/generated. Therefore the region would NOT be a place of cooling, but rather of a constant heating under great pressure, and the resultant process of fusion derived under such conditions - continually generating molten rock.

    Of course, as this molten rock is constantly increasing via this process of fusion, the pressure, also is ever mounting - and then needing to be released as magma via a volcano or the like - towards adding more to the physical environment we recognise.
    sunshinewarrior: If two people are using the same word, but applying different meanings to it, then they're not communicating.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  16. #15  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope skeptic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    4,843
    This discussion is a bit pointless.

    Nothing physical can survive even a large fraction of the way to the core. Heat and pressure build up to the point where even ceramics will fail. The only way we can probe the core is using non physical means, like seismic waves.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  17. #16  
    Forum Bachelors Degree Apopohis Reject's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    489
    Quote Originally Posted by skeptic
    This discussion is a bit pointless.
    That is your opinion, and in my opinion - around 80-90% of the threads and posts on this, and other kinds of forum, are entirely pointless, as they generally relate in a dishonest fashion - to opinion dressed up as fact.

    It really is about time that a few of us decided to GET REAL! Even so, such avenues give vent in a manner previously unavailable, and for that we can be truly grateful - in my opinion.
    sunshinewarrior: If two people are using the same word, but applying different meanings to it, then they're not communicating.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  18. #17  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    21
    I trhink digging into the middle of the earth if it were possible.
    I think would cause magnitic problems on earth.
    Can't give you science reason why I think this.

    I think if it were possible. digging a hole to the middle of the earth would cuase gravitational problem between the Earth and the Sun but this is just a thought....

    I think making a hole to the center of the Earth would make it hard for the Sun to hold on the earth the way it does know.

    Like I said it's just a thought.

    Would like to know your thoughts on this. If I'm wrong. Why ?


    *************Terry Arceneaux***************
    Reply With Quote  
     

  19. #18  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    97
    Quote Originally Posted by Terry Arceneaux
    I trhink digging into the middle of the earth if it were possible.
    I think would cause magnitic problems on earth.
    Can't give you science reason why I think this.

    I think if it were possible. digging a hole to the middle of the earth would cuase gravitational problem between the Earth and the Sun but this is just a thought....

    I think making a hole to the center of the Earth would make it hard for the Sun to hold on the earth the way it does know.

    Like I said it's just a thought.

    Would like to know your thoughts on this. If I'm wrong. Why ?


    *************Terry Arceneaux***************
    The gravitational pull is based on the masses and distance, not on the shape of the objects or whether the objects have a solid center. Besides, wouldn't any such hole fill up from the liquid outer core?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  20. #19  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope skeptic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    4,843
    The deepest hole ever drilled was just over 12 kms down, and the temperature was already 180 C, and the rocks were already becoming plastic - tending to flow inwards under pressure to seal off the bore hole.
    http://www.damninteresting.com/the-deepest-hole

    The Earth is over 12,000 kms through, meaning that, to reach the centre, the bore would have to go 500 times as deep as the deepest hole ever drilled. At the centre, the pressure is about 4,000 tonnes per square centimetre. The temperature is avout 7,000 C.

    Put it all together. There is no way - repeat absolutely no way - that even an advanced drilling system could penetrate to more than a fraction of the distance. Even to get to the Earth's mantle will be a titanic undertaking.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  21. #20  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    21
    I don't remember if I read this on another group sight or seen this on TV.
    I remember someone was gonna try drilling a hole to the center of the EARTH.
    but they could not do it.
    I think they made a start somewhere in Washington State. they got so deep did not make it. The equipment they had did not hold up to the task. So it got called off.
    Do not remember where I read that from.....
    Maybe some of you read about that.
    ********The Sky The Limit********

    Terry Arceneaux
    Reply With Quote  
     

  22. #21  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope skeptic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    4,843
    Terry

    You are probably thinking of the Moho Project. That was mooted several decades back, but cancelled due to lack of money. The Moho Project was named after the Mohorovicic discontinuity, which is the boundary between the crust and mantle of the Earth. The project was to drill in one of the spots where the crust was thin, and take samples directly from the top of the mantle. That is a very long way short of drilling to the centre of the Earth!

    The crust can be as little as 6 kms. To get past the mantle, though, needs another 3000 kms of drilling. And you are still not at the centre.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  23. #22  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    21
    Your probably right .
    I'm not much of a science wizard. I try to learn as much as I can to where I can understand it.
    My biggest interest to this sight is learning as I go. Also wanna learn a little more about the Earth
    . And how we can make life better on Earth.
    I think the Earth's system is very unique and complexed in it's own way. Next to understanding the human mind.
    I think if someone try to tamper with the earth system is asking for trouble.
    ********The Sky The Limit********

    Terry Arceneaux
    Reply With Quote  
     

  24. #23  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    10
    Sure, it's possible. Can you create an element that doesn't melt at Core temperatures and can you provide an energy source to plow through relatively stable material (following the principle that things are most stable at the environments they are created).

    Oh and who is the unlucky labor that has to fix the drill head when it breaks...
    www.ecosphereblog.com
    I blog about the environment, nature, and science I encounter, learn about, or see.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  25. #24  
    Forum Bachelors Degree x(x-y)'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    462
    We currently know of no materials that can withstand the extreme temperatures and pressure of even the mantle- let alone the outer and inner core. I think the metal with the highest melting point is tungsten with a melting point of a few thousand°C, and the inner core has the temperature of a the surface of the sun. And this isn't mentioning the pressure, the inner core is solid even under extreme temperature conditions...

    In the movie 'The Core', they invented an element called 'unobtainium' which theoretically became stronger with increased pressure...
    "Nature doesn't care what we call it, she just does it anyway" - R. Feynman
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •