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  1. #1 two question+(^_^)+ 
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    Are the thicker the ice layer in South and North,the better the ability of reflection of sunlight?Example,the ice layer of South reflects more light than ice layer of North(I don't know this example is true or wrong,please tell me,thank you).

    North Atlantic warm flow flows through North,it brings the warm and wet air to the North.Is this true?
    Does North Altantic Warm Flow increase the temperature of sea water and air in North Pole?

    Please tell me the answer.Thanks.


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    Please help me!


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    Your post didn't make much sense, it isn't worded very well, especially the second paragraph.
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    Please help me.I am not good in English....please understand slowly and answer me.
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  6. #5 Re: two question+(^_^)+ 
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    Quote Originally Posted by ~James~
    Are the thicker the ice layer in South and North,the better the ability of reflection of sunlight?Example,the ice layer of South reflects more light than ice layer of North(I don't know this example is true or wrong,please tell me,thank you).
    Yes - albedo increases with increasing ice thickness ...

    but that's not the only reason for the colder Antarctic ...

    North Atlantic warm flow flows through North,it brings the warm and wet air to the North.Is this true?
    Yes

    Does North Altantic Warm Flow increase the temperature of sea water and air in North Pole?
    Not significantly - the North Atlantic Western Boundary Current (Gulf Stream) does not enter the Arctic Basins, but does bring warmer water to Western Scandinavia (mostly Norway) and the UK ...
    Nature abhors perfection; cats abhor a vacuum.

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    Thank you to Cran.
    I have a question...
    Does the North Atalntic Ocean obstruct any warm flow to flow to South?
    Does the South Circumfluence decrease the temperature of Antartica and South Pole?Why?
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    but the North Atlantic Warm Flow(N.A.W.F) enter the Arctic Circle....why N.A.W.F
    does not increase the temperature of north pole?
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    Quote Originally Posted by ~James~
    Thank you to Cran.
    I have a question...
    Does the North Atalntic Ocean obstruct any warm flow to flow to South?
    No.

    Does the South Circumfluence decrease the temperature of Antartica and South Pole?Why?
    Indirectly, yes.
    Do you know which water masses contribute to the Circumpolar Current?

    The Circumpolar Current has a similar impact to the southern Western Boundary Currents, as the Baffin outflow and Arctic Boundary Current have on the North Atlantic Gulf Stream - Norwegian Current ...

    but the North Atlantic Warm Flow(N.A.W.F) enter the Arctic Circle....why N.A.W.F does not increase the temperature of north pole?
    entering the Arctic Circle (crossing the Greenland-Faroe-Scotland ridge) is still a long way short of reaching the North Pole ...
    what happens when warm water meets cold water and cold air?
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    Thank you to Cran!!!!!!!!

    My last question:
    Does the ocean current(cold current) that flow around the Antanctica(it is not west wind drift) decrease the temperature of Antarctica?

    The thousuand islands cold current will decrease the temperature of north pole?Please explain>>>>
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    Why South Pole is colder than North Pole?Please give me all reason..thank you!
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    Quote Originally Posted by ~James~
    Why South Pole is colder than North Pole?Please give me all reason..thank you!
    It's surrounded by an ocean. 1 tonne of water, can heat/cool, 3000 tonnes of air.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ~James~
    Why South Pole is colder than North Pole?Please give me all reason..thank you!
    all of the reasons, plus the explanations for each, would mean writing a book for you - I'm not prepared to do that ...

    a brief dot point list of the main reasons:

    - the South Pole is in a large land mass; the North Pole is in a roughly circular ocean ...

    - Antarctica is all but completely surrounded by ocean; the Arctic is all but completely surrounded by land ...

    - the insulation properties of ice, and the specific heat of water, retard thermal changes in both directions (ie, heating and cooling) ...

    - the specific heat of water is higher than the specific heat of rock, and there are large areas of the interior of Antarctica which are not covered by ice ...

    - all of the water masses which feed into the Circumpolar Current also contribute to its temperature ...
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    Are the wind in South Pole more than the wind in North Pole?
    Are the wind speed of south Pole faster than the wind speed of North Pole?
    Does the wind blow away the heat?
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    Quote Originally Posted by ~James~
    Are the wind in South Pole more than the wind in North Pole?
    Not really, but there are differences at the boundary layer due to the different topographies involved ...

    both poles are dominated by a central high pressure system which drives the polar easterlies ... with the coriolis effect from rotation, these winds can and do turn towards the lower latitudes (becoming north-easterlies in the northern hemisphere, and south-easterlies in the southern hemisphere), and are generally the coldest winds known in most regions ... where these cold winds (or fronts) meet warmer (and often wetter) air masses, storms develop - the type of storm depends on the topography of the underlying surface ...

    Are the wind speed of south Pole faster than the wind speed of North Pole?
    Not really, but there are differences at the boundary layer due to the different topographies involved ...

    Does the wind blow away the heat?
    what heat is that?

    moving air anywhere can affect surface temperatures, especially if water is involved ... wind in high latitudes add what is called "the wind chill factor" to local and regional weather estimates or assessments - so, in general terms, you could say, "yes" ...

    however, surface heat loss at the poles is dominated by OLR - outgoing longwave radiation - or in common terms, "night" ...
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    Are the area of ice layer in South bigger than the area of ice layer in North?
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    Quote Originally Posted by ~James~
    Are the area of ice layer in South bigger than the area of ice layer in North?
    that depends on when you're asking ...

    during the northern winter - no ...

    during the southern winter - quite probably ...

    on average - not really, but that could change ...
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    Why a passage say the wind speed of south pole is faster than the wind speed of north pole?
    The average wind speed(South Pole)-57mph
    (North Pole)-16mph
    What is mph?
    The passage is produced by NOAA...
    Cran..he is true or you are true.....
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    http://coastalscience.noaa.gov/education/aabook.pdf
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    mph is miles per hour -
    rough conversion multiply miles by 1.6 to get kilometres per hour ...

    if you ever have to choose between NOAA and an individual, pick NOAA -
    you'll have more evidence more often to back you up that way ...

    I admit I did not know that the Arctic average was as low as that -
    I'm presuming that's the surface (boundary layer) average ...

    I was confusing the Arctic with the Arctic fringes (like Greenland) and katabatic winds and upper layers -
    it's been a long time since ocean-atmosphere studies at university ...

    Katabatic winds occur when cooled, dense air flows down slopes. Over extensive snow-covered plateaus or highlands large-scale katabatic drainage winds may develop. This is common over the Greenland ice sheet. In some places katabatic winds are channeled by mountain valleys, and the wind accelerates to potentially destructive speeds. Steep slopes can also accelerate the katabatic flow. Along the edge of the massive Greenland ice sheet, katabatic winds frequently exceed 100 kilometers per hour... [~ 60 mph]

    The Arctic winter is characterized by high winds with snowstorms between calm periods. With little to slow them, Arctic winds scour open areas, and deposit loads of snow in sheltered areas. Nevertheless, in the Arctic, winter surface wind speeds are often lower than in summer due to the frequent occurrence of inversions (when warm air tops a surface cold layer). The inversion layer decouples surface wind from stronger upper layer winds.
    http://nsidc.org/arcticmet/factors/winds.html
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    I have determined that the wind speed of south pole is faster than the wind speed of north..Does the wind will lost the heat and decrease the temperatture of south and north?So,this is a reason of south is colder than north?
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    Quote Originally Posted by ~James~
    I have determined that the wind speed of south pole is faster than the wind speed of north..Does the wind will lost the heat and decrease the temperatture of south and north?So,this is a reason of south is colder than north?
    The Southern hemisphere is more ocean than the northern. Land is a far better insulator than water and therefore is warmer. This is the main reason the north is warmer than the south and has higher temperature variation from season to season.
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    Quote Originally Posted by cypress
    Land is a far better insulator than water and therefore is warmer.
    What gives you that idea?
    Nature abhors perfection; cats abhor a vacuum.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ~James~
    Why South Pole is colder than North Pole?Please give me all reason..thank you!
    Another reason is the average altitude of Antarctica is well over a mile high, compared to a less than 10' for the top of the Arctic Ocean's Ice. Just that fact alone would make Antarctic temperatures at least 25F cooler.
    Meteorologist/Naturalist & Retired Soldier
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    Quote Originally Posted by cypress
    Land is a far better insulator than water and therefore is warmer.
    Strictly speaking that's way off. Rock has a thermal conductivity between 4-12 times that of water. Water is a much better insulator.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox
    Quote Originally Posted by cypress
    Land is a far better insulator than water and therefore is warmer.
    Strictly speaking that's way off. Rock has a thermal conductivity between 4-12 times that of water. Water is a much better insulator.
    damn! now ya dun spoiled ma fun! ...

    I wanted to see how cypress was going to climb out of that self-dug hole ...
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    Ground is solid and opaque and only conductive heat transfer occurs. The sea surface water is well mixed making convection significant. In addition it is semitransparent to the spectrum of sun irradiance down to 300-500 feet and more.

    Accounting for all heat transfer modes, solid ground is the better insulator.

    In addition much of the heat absorbed by the ocean is consumed by water evaporation.
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    Quote Originally Posted by cypress
    Ground is solid and opaque and only conductive heat transfer occurs.
    I guess the teacher was ill on the day you were supposed to cover radiation, hmm?

    The sea surface water is well mixed making convection significant. In addition it is semitransparent to the spectrum of sun irradiance down to 300-500 feet and more.

    Accounting for all heat transfer modes, solid ground is the better insulator.
    funny - when I went to school, "the better insulator" was the one which gained and lost the least amount of heat ...
    when did that change?

    In addition much of the heat absorbed by the ocean is consumed by water evaporation.
    which, by your reckoning, means that all of the surface water and icecaps should vaporise every day, and re-condense every night ...

    strangely though, the ground still gets hotter and colder than than the water,
    and it still takes less energy to raise the temperature of 1kg of rock by 1K
    than it does to raise the temperature of 1kg of water by 1K ...

    and the 1kg of rock loses that excess heat faster than the water (it's that damned radiation again -
    on a global scale it's called OLR, locally we call it infra-red, or heat) ...
    Nature abhors perfection; cats abhor a vacuum.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cran
    Quote Originally Posted by cypress
    Ground is solid and opaque and only conductive heat transfer occurs.
    I guess the teacher was ill on the day you were supposed to cover radiation, hmm?

    The sea surface water is well mixed making convection significant. In addition it is semitransparent to the spectrum of sun irradiance down to 300-500 feet and more.

    Accounting for all heat transfer modes, solid ground is the better insulator.
    funny - when I went to school, "the better insulator" was the one which gained and lost the least amount of heat ...
    when did that change?
    No, sorry the meaning of "better insulator" has always been the medium that has the most total resistance to heat transfer through the medium. Sea water is less resistant to heat transfer and ground is more.

    strangely though, the ground still gets hotter and colder than than the water,
    and it still takes less energy to raise the temperature of 1kg of rock by 1K
    than it does to raise the temperature of 1kg of water by 1K ...
    Not strange at all. That is correct since heat transfer to greater depths is slowed by the higher resistance, therefore heat builds up at the surface, which was my original point.

    and the 1kg of rock loses that excess heat faster than the water (it's that damned radiation again -
    on a global scale it's called OLR, locally we call it infra-red, or heat) ...
    Correct again since heat energy transfer from subsurface is slowed relative to water by the better overall insulating properties.

    Why are we having an argument about this? Are you unfamiliar with heat transfer principles?
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    we're having this (argument) because your idea of what's going on is completely opposite the mainstream scientific view ...

    Quote Originally Posted by cypress
    No, sorry the meaning of "better insulator" has always been the medium that has the most total resistance to heat transfer through the medium.
    OK - I'll go with that (the rest, though is rubbish) ...

    Thermal conductivity is the quantity of heat transmitted through a unit thickness in a direction normal to a surface of unit area, due to a unit temperature gradient under steady state conditions.


    @25C unless otherwise specified

    Water 0.58
    Water, vapor (steam) 0.016(@125C)
    Snow 0.05 - 0.25 (< 0oC)

    Earth, dry 1.5
    Quartz mineral 3
    Rock, solid 2 - 7
    Rock, porous volcanic (Tuff) 0.5 - 2.5
    Sandstone 1.7
    - http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/th...ity-d_429.html


    Water has the second highest specific heat capacity of all known substances, after ammonia, as well as a high heat of vaporization (40.65 kJ·mol−1), both of which are a result of the extensive hydrogen bonding between its molecules. These two unusual properties allow water to moderate Earth's climate by buffering large fluctuations in temperature.

    The specific enthalpy of fusion of water is 333.55 kJ·kg−1 at 0 °C. Of common substances, only that of ammonia is higher. This property confers resistance to melting upon the ice of glaciers and drift ice.
    -http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Properties_of_water
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