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Thread: Russia, Northern Asia and Europe, following a latitude

  1. #1 Russia, Northern Asia and Europe, following a latitude 
    Forum Masters Degree Golkarian's Avatar
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    Does anyone know why the Russian coast appears to follow a latitude? On a globe it appears strange because the coast is following a curve, but with an obvious relationship to something else.


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    WYSIWYG Moderator marnixR's Avatar
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    perceived patterns do not always require an explanation
    they could, after all, be just that: a perception - or a coincidence


    "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away." (Philip K. Dick)
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  4. #3  
    Forum Masters Degree Golkarian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marnixR
    perceived patterns do not always require an explanation
    they could, after all, be just that: a perception - or a coincidence
    Hm, I don't think so. It follows the latitude for nearly half the globe:

    https://www.cia.gov/library/publicat...mplate_rs.html

    Admittedly it strays in the middle, maybe that's significant enough to prove me wrong... :?
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  5. #4  
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    Err, it doesn't acctually follow a latitude line. It's just-about almost straight if you squint at it and ignore the bits that aren't, just the same as half the world's coasts are.

    Note that the shape of the coast doesn't really bare any resemblance to the shape of the continental shelf (light blue bit), which is geologically speaking the edge of the continent
    http://geology.com/world/arctic-ocea...ymetry-map.jpg
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  6. #5  
    WYSIWYG Moderator marnixR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Golkarian
    Admittedly it strays in the middle, maybe that's significant enough to prove me wrong... :?
    surely if you look at the map of yours you can see how the arctic circle, which to the best of my knowledge represents latitude, crosses the coast at the tip of Siberia, and again in the north of Russia - inbetween you get any variation from a small to a substantial distance

    if that approximates to following a line of latitude then it's not a very useful approximation
    "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away." (Philip K. Dick)
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  7. #6  
    Forum Masters Degree Golkarian's Avatar
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    ok, I sort of see it.
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  8. #7  
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    This may be relevant. If there is any linear nature to the coast, it is surely not a static feature.

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