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Thread: Keeping up with Mt. St. Helens

  1. #1 Keeping up with Mt. St. Helens 
    Forum Senior silkworm's Avatar
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    Recent rockfalls into the volcano have caused dust to go over the rim. Who knows what this thing is going to do? Hardest thing to understand is what we're standing on.

    Here's a link to a website that regularly updates images of Mt. St. Helens. I find it useful because I live nowhere near Oregon.

    http://www.fs.fed.us/gpnf/volcanocams/msh/


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  3. #2  
    Forum Senior silkworm's Avatar
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    Here is an article explaining what exactly what is going on with Mt. St. Helens. I had no idea that it was actually erupting, I just knew there were earthquakes recently showing the lava is on its way.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2005/11/29/sc...cbhZd4MwxjqUJg


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  4. #3  
    Forum Senior silkworm's Avatar
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    Here's a new link for a different volcano cam. The other one is nice but it breaks sometimes.


    http://www.dashboardwidgets.com/show...s.php?wid=1125
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  5. #4  
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
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    On a broader base consider the website on volcanoes from the Smithsonian Institute.

    The Smithsonian's Global Volcanism Program seeks better understanding of all volcanoes through documenting their eruptions — small as well as large — during the past 10,000 years.

    It has several sections:

    Volcano News provides regular updates of eruptions: Eruptive activity began at Fuego on 27 December. Lava flows traveled down several ravines, pyroclastic flows were generated, and ash plumes rose to ~2 km above the volcano (or 18,900 ft a.s.l.). Small amounts of ash fell in villages near the volcano.

    You can search for volcanoes by name, region or eruption date. There is information on all volcanoes, sometimes brief, often quite detailed.

    There are activity reports: All reports of volcanic activity published by the Smithsonian since 1968, with a few exceptions that are still being prepared, are available through a monthly table of contents or by searching for a specific volcano For example, the weekly report from 28 Dec-3 Jan contains details on twelve eruptions.

    The site is well worth a visit if you like volcanoes.
    http://www.volcano.si.edu/index.cfm
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