Notices
Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Collision of two continental plates weld them together?

  1. #1 Collision of two continental plates weld them together? 
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    18
    When two continental plates collide, like say the Indian plate and the Euroasian plate, do they get welded together at the collision point? Have previously collided continental plates split apart again at the same "junction"? Or become a transform fault and the two plates start to slide as at the San Andreas transform fault?


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    WYSIWYG Moderator marnixR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Cardiff, Wales
    Posts
    5,699
    the Iapetus ocean is a good example of an ocean that disappeared along a line from Newfoundland through Ireland and Scotland to Norway when Laurentia, Baltica and Avalonia collided

    when the Atlantic ocean opened up, it followed more or less (but not quite) the old suture


    "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away." (Philip K. Dick)
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    18
    Quote Originally Posted by marnixR
    the Iapetus ocean is a good example of an ocean that disappeared along a line from Newfoundland through Ireland and Scotland to Norway when Laurentia, Baltica and Avalonia collided

    when the Atlantic ocean opened up, it followed more or less (but not quite) the old suture
    Thanks marnixR. That link took me on a "trip" thru wikipedia, ending up at the Supercontinent Cycle: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilson_cycle
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    WYSIWYG Moderator marnixR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Cardiff, Wales
    Posts
    5,699
    although calling it a cycle with 2 known supercontinents (+ beyond 1 billion years things get a bit too fuzzy to be sure) is maybe a bit overgenerous :wink:
    "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away." (Philip K. Dick)
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    18
    Quote Originally Posted by marnixR
    although calling it a cycle with 2 known supercontinents (+ beyond 1 billion years things get a bit too fuzzy to be sure) is maybe a bit overgenerous :wink:
    Yes - there are no citations in the article for the earlier supercontinents. Here's a summary from the wiki article:

    - Pangaea, formed about 300 million years ago.
    - Pannotia, formed about 600 million years ago.
    - Gondwanaland
    - Rodinia, existed ~1.1 billion to ~750 million years ago
    - Pannotia
    - Columbia: ~1.8 to 1.5 billion years ago.
    - Kenorland: ~2.7 to ~2.1 billion years ago.
    - Ur (existed ~3 billion years ago)
    - Vaalbara (~3.6 to ~2.8 billion years ago).
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •