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Thread: About processes that record time

  1. #1 About processes that record time 
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    Hello everyone!!

    Well, I have some questions to ask..

    1). What is the length of time recorded by the deposition of sediments?

    I think "years" is the correct answer for my question, but i am not utterly sure..

    2). What is the length of time recorded by the deposition of stones?

    Hundreds of years? More or less?

    3). Which other processes do record time? And what is the length of time recorded by them (approximately)?

    Please answer my questions..i would be grateful..i want to unravel these things into my head.

    Many thanks!! :wink:

    Dimitra


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  3. #2  
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    As in deep sea sediments formed from dead creatures?

    If you mean with respect to fluvial or glacial action these of course will all vary depending on local conditions (flow speed, the amount of material being transported...etc)

    A simple example, if you look at the Nile delta, you have far more deposition here because it's such a huge river whereas with a small local stream there would be much less deposition.


    Thinking of the question is greater than knowing the answer...
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  4. #3 Re: About processes that record time 
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    Quote Originally Posted by dimitra18
    1). What is the length of time recorded by the deposition of sediments?

    I think "years" is the correct answer for my question, but i am not utterly sure..
    Google "oldest sedimentary rock" and you'll get an answer.

    2). What is the length of time recorded by the deposition of stones?

    Hundreds of years? More or less?
    This would be the same as above, surely? There are older rocks that are not sedimentary, but I wouldn't describe them as being deposited.

    3). Which other processes do record time? And what is the length of time recorded by them (approximately)?
    Try looking up:
    Radiometric dating
    Dendrochronology (tree ring dating)
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  5. #4  
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    Ice cores, decay, - these things record time.
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  6. #5  
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    Proximity to other things that are well dated by other means such as volcanic ash layers, plant and animal fossils etc.
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