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Thread: any idea about network algorithms?... please help

  1. #1 any idea about network algorithms?... please help 
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    does anyone know the algorithms of a computer network? can you please give an idea...


    thanks!!!


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  3. #2 Re: any idea about network algorithms?... please help 
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    Quote Originally Posted by kulunggoy
    does anyone know the algorithms of a computer network? can you please give an idea...


    thanks!!!
    You need to state the language before someone can help you and describe the network you want.


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  4. #3  
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    can u give some example of language? im sorry i dont have any idea about that... ... im to illiterate about that...
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    Forum Masters Degree SuperNatendo's Avatar
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    C, C++, Python, SSL, HTML, Basic, VisualBasic

    I'm not sure what you mean by "network algorithms" though.

    Most computer networks use TCP/UDP IPv4 to operate, thats not really a computer language, more like a "mail" system

    Wireless networks have encryption keys like WEP, WPA, WPA2
    "It's no wonder that truth is stranger than fiction. Fiction has to make sense." - Mark Twain
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  6. #5  
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    ahh .. i see... i much prefer for C++... im talking about what is happening in a computer networks in numerical explanation... do i call it networking algorithm? im not sure too
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  7. #6  
    Forum Masters Degree SuperNatendo's Avatar
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    Ahh, well, in a network, there needs to be a way to know what data goes to what computer. This is where IPv4 comes in.

    There are many different ways to network, but lets use the following example:

    Lets say you have two laptops, a dsl modem, and a wireless router. The router, as long as it is set this way, will assign your two computers different IP address. An IP address is a set of 4 binary octets or 32 bits. this means that it can have a decimal value of anything from 1.1.1.1 to 255.255.255.255. Usually your router will assign your laptops something like 192.168.1.100 and 192.168.1.101 respectively as long as your computers are set to Automatically obtain an IP address using DHCP. Now, the router has to get it's internet connection from the dsl modem. The dsl modem has internet access because the phone company gives it an IP address in a similar way your router gives your computer an IP. These IP's from the phone company do not use 192.168.xxx.xxx as your router does and can be pretty much anything. The dsl modem simply passes the ip address it got through to the router via a bridge. That way, the information going to and from the internet through your router knows where it is going and where it is coming from. when data needs to go to your laptop your router sees that the first address is the one the phone company gave your modem and the second address says 192.168.1.100 and sends it to you. If it is data that needs to go to your friend the router sees 192.168.1.101 on the second address part of the data and sends it to him.

    Soon, all of this will be changing, at least in the next 10 yrs, because the number of devices connecting to the internet will be greater than the possible number of unique IP addresses. This new standard is called IPv6 and will use 128-bit 16-octet addressing as opposed to the 32-bit 4-octet IPv4 for its addressing. It is common to see examples that attempt to show that the IPv6 address space is extremely large. For example, IPv6 supports 2^128 (about 3.4×10^38) addresses, or approximately 5×10^28 addresses for each of the roughly 6.5 billion (6.5×10^9) people alive today. Instead of translating the binary octets into decimal, it will utilize hexadecimal values.
    "It's no wonder that truth is stranger than fiction. Fiction has to make sense." - Mark Twain
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  8. #7  
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    thank you very much for the explanation.. now i get some ideas.. thanks...

    im using this simulator packet tracer and i noticed this....
    im curious about this variables(screen shot: packet tracer)




    any idea, what's that?
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  9. #8  
    Forum Sophomore CShark's Avatar
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    Sorry, not a clue
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  10. #9  
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    do you mean "neural network algorithm" or just "network algorithm"?
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  11. #10  
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    i go for both....
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  12. #11  
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    I have no idea.
    but you can visite:
    www.researchdirectory.blogspot.com

    i think you find some resource.
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  13. #12  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Forhad
    I have no idea.
    but you can visite:
    www.researchdirectory.blogspot.com

    i think you find some resource.
    better you put search tool in your blog.. help visitor to find what they need.
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