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Thread: Linux

  1. #1 Linux 
    Forum Sophomore cleft's Avatar
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    Ok, I am tired of the rat race with Windoze. Microsucks loves to play the game of upgrades, suggesting you need to keep up with everyone else in the business and computing world by buying the lastest and greatest. Often I find the latest isn't worth the money nor the effort to do so. In addition to that I find that the security craters that are in windoze isn't Microsucks main interests. Instead, their main interest is to leave holes in your security so that they can sell commercial licenses and courses on how to break into your computer to obtain info on you, further enriching their pockets from both ends. It certainly isn't to your benefit as the user they are looking to.

    In addition it seems like everyone and their bother is now able to use those hack tools to spread viruses, trojans, and other malware to make your computing life difficult. One of the biggest problems in that area is that Microsucks doesn't allow you to drop portions that are riddled with those holes preferring you get the package deal and that those holes remain because you have little choice for the most part if you use the approved tools within the OS.

    I made up my mind to begin the journey of learning linux. I do intend to get away from all that I hate about Windoze and the Microsucks philosphy. I downloaded Knoppix linux today to try out some of linux and see just how much I had to learn. Was I EVER suprised!!! Knoppix is a sort of beginners linux that runs off the cd without hd install. It is what I am using now to write this post. While I realise I have a long way to go, it is nice to know that linux has come a long ways from what I heard it was. This is about as close to windoze as anyone could expect as far as being able to just fire it up and use it. I also have a copy of Suse that I will be later intending to install and use as a main OS. Thankfully I have most all the ebooks I would ever need to learn to modify and use the command line. For now, just to begin my first day I find that it is extremely easy to adjust to and I can live with what I have found as a first step.


    "Moral indignation is jealousy with a halo."
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  3. #2  
    Forum Isotope (In)Sanity's Avatar
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    This site runs 100% off Linux. I've been meaning to change my laptop over to Linux. If you use Open Office (Free) and Firefox and Thunderbird (email) then it's great. I'm using Firefox and Thunderbird now on Windows, so not much pain there. Suse is a good place to go I think. KDE is a bit better then Gnome IMO.

    Best of luck, and feel free to ask some questions. I'm very good with the command line on Linux. I compile all my stuff from the ground up. It takes patience to really get to know Linux, once you do you realize how sad MS stuff really is. It's like the hand built Ferrari vs the Hyundai. Most anyone who has ill words toward Linux has either never used it, or never got past 1st base.


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  4. #3  
    Forum Sophomore cleft's Avatar
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    Today I installed Suse and am for the now on a dual boot system. Since it has worked so well, I am encouraged to continue on with Linux. Everything seems to run fine. I have yet to get to the nuts and bolts of the OS but it seems to run great.

    While it is nice to know that if needed, the old OS I know works and is there in case I get into some sort of trouble, I will continue to work with Linux in an attempt to get away from Microsucks.

    Suse seems to be a very nice OS for starters and seems to have most all I need for now.
    "Moral indignation is jealousy with a halo."
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  5. #4  
    Forum Professor Pendragon's Avatar
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    suse is good, my brother used it for a long time (he can be described as a linux addict). At the moment I'm using Obuntu, which is a more user-friendly version of Linux (I'm not sure which distribution it is based on).
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  6. #5  
    Forum Sophomore cleft's Avatar
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    At present, I have moved on from Suse to try Redhat. This machine, no longer a dual boot but rather a straight forward linux machine. I downloaded a copy of both the run disc and the install of Ubuntu and plan to give that a try also.
    "Moral indignation is jealousy with a halo."
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  7. #6  
    Forum Isotope (In)Sanity's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cleft
    At present, I have moved on from Suse to try Redhat. This machine, no longer a dual boot but rather a straight forward linux machine. I downloaded a copy of both the run disc and the install of Ubuntu and plan to give that a try also.
    I think moving to Redhat is kind of going backwards, that however is just my opinion. Redhat tends to be a bit of the weaker Linux distros in terms of it just has too much bulk overhead. It's not a lean mean machine so to speak.
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  8. #7  
    Forum Freshman poly_nightmare's Avatar
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    I run Windows now and I rarely have a serious problem. My work computer acts up a lot since it only has 128 MB of RAM. So, it runs unbearably slow. My home computer runs fine. I have Linux on another computer in my house. I don't turn it on a whole lot. I mostly use it to learn Linux. I don't have it hooked up to the internet. Mostly because I am too lazy to hookup a wireless connection in my house. I really don't have a problem with either operating system.
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  9. #8  
    Forum Sophomore cleft's Avatar
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    I sort of agree with the bulk overbloat on Redhat. Since I am sampling before deciding on what to sort of stay with. For now it is a whole new world out there. I intend to uninstall Redhat shortly and try the Ubuntu next.

    At some point I will reach a place where I need to get serious with it and learn the compling methods to change source code to install programs. I ran into the need to know with the Redhat and its RPM installer packages. For now that is a point in the future but I now understand the need to know.
    "Moral indignation is jealousy with a halo."
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  10. #9  
    Forum Isotope (In)Sanity's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by poly_nightmare
    I run Windows now and I rarely have a serious problem. My work computer acts up a lot since it only has 128 MB of RAM. So, it runs unbearably slow. My home computer runs fine. I have Linux on another computer in my house. I don't turn it on a whole lot. I mostly use it to learn Linux. I don't have it hooked up to the internet. Mostly because I am too lazy to hookup a wireless connection in my house. I really don't have a problem with either operating system.
    Having been a windows user since it's conception before 3.1 I have to say it works ok. I however did find that like a car in need of an oil change you have to rebuild it from time to time. My longest running windows install has been about 8 months before something went wrong. I would love to say this laptop is the longest running but it has weird issues with the OS. Linux servers on the other hand I've had up for years and they work flawlessly. I think it's the patches MS provides that cause many of the problems.
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  11. #10  
    Forum Freshman poly_nightmare's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by (In)Sanity
    Having been a windows user since it's conception before 3.1 I have to say it works ok. I however did find that like a car in need of an oil change you have to rebuild it from time to time. My longest running windows install has been about 8 months before something went wrong. I would love to say this laptop is the longest running but it has weird issues with the OS. Linux servers on the other hand I've had up for years and they work flawlessly. I think it's the patches MS provides that cause many of the problems.
    The only Windows I had a real problem with was '98. That was an awful OS. The real beef with Windows is the updates and patches. MY school runs Server 2003 and there is nothing more annoying that having to update the server and then having to worry about restarting. If hackers really wanted to, they would try to hack into Linux and do things.
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  12. #11  
    Forum Isotope (In)Sanity's Avatar
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    If hackers really wanted to, they would try to hack into Linux and do things.
    They do try, and sometimes succeed. The difference is because all the source code is open to the world a patch or fix often comes out 10x faster then a Windows patch. Windows is a car with the hood welded shut, Linux comes with a factory service manual.
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  13. #12  
    Forum Sophomore cleft's Avatar
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    Windows is a car with the hood welded shut, Linux comes with a factory service manual.
    Love that simile. This is part of what I am after in the long run. I am so tired of the spyware, the virii, and the malware, etc. The cost of all the programs to support the removal of all those problems simply isn't worth it to try and maintain the OS (not to even consider the cost of the OS).
    "Moral indignation is jealousy with a halo."
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  14. #13  
    Forum Sophomore cleft's Avatar
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    Ok, I am back to SuSE. Question I have is how to I make RPMs or installable packages from tarballs? Many supporting libraries and the like only come in the tarballs which isn't supported by YAST that I know of. So how do I get these into a configuration that will allow the installion of those items?
    "Moral indignation is jealousy with a halo."
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  15. #14  
    Forum Freshman poly_nightmare's Avatar
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    I'm actually looking into getting Linux Certification and then get Microsoft Certifcation. I'd be skilled in both OSeseseseseses
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