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Thread: Learning a programming language.

  1. #1 Learning a programming language. 
    Forum Freshman maxking's Avatar
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    Guyz i'm still a newbie and i have no expirience in programming can you guyz help me. like which programmin language is best to i start learning.


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    Forum Radioactive Isotope MagiMaster's Avatar
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    I've heard good things about Python as a beginner language. I started with BASIC myself, although I'm not sure I'd recommend that. Pascal was designed for teaching programming.

    More important than a specific language though is motivation. You need to keep yourself motivated to learn the next bit. So the question is, what do you want to do with programming? If you're working towards game making, my suggestions would be different than if you were going in to scientific computing or business computing, etc.


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  4. #3  
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    i personally will suggest c++.
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    Forum Radioactive Isotope MagiMaster's Avatar
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    C isn't the base of that many languages, and I don't recommend it at all. It's also horribly ugly for more complicated programs. Go with C++ if you want to learn one of the major languages.

    The only places where C is heavily used, as far as I'm aware, is OS programming (and other systems programming) and some business enterprise systems (though they use a lot of very old languages in general).
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    Forum Professor Wild Cobra's Avatar
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    Well, I'm rather biased, and my answer will likely not be a popular one.

    I say Assembler is the only way to go. It is the closest to machine language you can get. If you get real good at it, you can write faster programs than others, and not the "bloatware" commonly found today.
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    Forum Professor river_rat's Avatar
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    The trick is to pick a language you like (or you think you may like), be it java or python or C or object C or C++ or C# etc etc etc and start programming. Hell be daring and pick LUA Or be crazy and pick Haskell! Once you are happy with that language pick another one. Learn whats good about each language but more importantly what is bad about each language. Rinse and repeat.

    The language is not what is important, its thinking like a programmer that's important and you only learn that when trying to program. Worrying about the language when you are starting out is like worrying about the brand name of hammer you should use when you want to start learning woodwork.

    But if you need a place to start I suggest python. It's far enough away from the bare metal that you can't get into too much trouble but powerful enough so that you can start doing some interesting things quite quickly.
    As is often the case with technical subjects we are presented with an unfortunate choice: an explanation that is accurate but incomprehensible, or comprehensible but wrong.
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  8. #7  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope MagiMaster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wild Cobra
    Well, I'm rather biased, and my answer will likely not be a popular one.

    I say Assembler is the only way to go. It is the closest to machine language you can get. If you get real good at it, you can write faster programs than others, and not the "bloatware" commonly found today.
    I'll agree that not many people would agree with you. I don't think assembly is good for beginning programmers. Also, you have to be really good to outperform modern optimizing compilers (at least on normal problems on normal architectures). Though I suppose most of those are geared towards speed, not space, so yeah, you can write smaller code easier.
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  9. #8  
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    Hello,
    I started learning c++. It is the basic programing course! If you are a newbie, I suggest you start with it.
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  10. #9  
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    C and C++ you'll have to learn memory management which can be overwhelming for a beginner. With C you won't learn much about object orientated programming. Java is a good starter language simply because you don't have to deal with memory management, advanced API's, and can dabble in OOP. Once you learn that back up to C++, then C.

    That is unless your masochistic then try for assembly first and go to C.
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  11. #10  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope MagiMaster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlinton View Post
    C and C++ you'll have to learn memory management which can be overwhelming for a beginner. With C you won't learn much about object orientated programming. Java is a good starter language simply because you don't have to deal with memory management, advanced API's, and can dabble in OOP. Once you learn that back up to C++, then C.

    That is unless your masochistic then try for assembly first and go to C.
    The only problem there is that if you skip the memory management, it can be hard to pick it up fully later. Forgetting a delete is the kind of error you don't want to make regularly.
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  12. #11  
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    Quote Originally Posted by MagiMaster View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by tlinton View Post
    C and C++ you'll have to learn memory management which can be overwhelming for a beginner. With C you won't learn much about object orientated programming. Java is a good starter language simply because you don't have to deal with memory management, advanced API's, and can dabble in OOP. Once you learn that back up to C++, then C.

    That is unless your masochistic then try for assembly first and go to C.
    The only problem there is that if you skip the memory management, it can be hard to pick it up fully later. Forgetting a delete is the kind of error you don't want to make regularly.
    Welp start off in memory management C/C++ but for godsake, please anything you do, remember to check the length of your data type when copying!
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    Forum Freshman iantresman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by maxking View Post
    Guyz i'm still a newbie and i have no experience in programming can you guyz help me. like which programming language is best to i start learning.
    It depends what you want to do with your programming language. I make web sites, so it is useful to know php. But PHP can be deficult to set-up and run (you need to have an Apache server running), which can be set-up with a WAMP package. On the other hand, Javascript is even easier to start using.
    Ian Tresman
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  14. #13  
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    Quote Originally Posted by maxking View Post
    Guyz i'm still a newbie and i have no expirience in programming can you guyz help me. like which programmin language is best to i start learning.
    Here's not anything clear about the purpose of your learning. First you should clarify for what purpose you want to learn a programming language?
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    One of our specializations is mobile phone programming; Softage is the team of mobile software developers who build technological expertise in mobile area since 2000. They use proven project management methodologies and QA practices, carefully. In the past years successfull projects have been completed with a number of mobile & wireless networks. Software development departments deal with embedded Linux development, developing mobile applications, Windows Mobile development services.

    Learning mobile phone programming was a strategy for business with time been the essence. These days certain networks reached an advataged platform where the network cleared a signal not breaching the space of other networks, so this improvement worries me to some extent, the frequency programs are platformed on different networks where other networks users have businesses of trust and need the same quality. I'm not an expert for exmaple if I was an business holder, director or member of governmental department and the employees worked from a network that was trusted, would I have to change networks for a higher faster more direct clearer signal to allow non-signal dropouts. It's a strange scenario, I was connected to a virgin mobile network last month and there was no signal, later that day, still no signal i recieved a call later and the quality of the call was second to none.

    A qualitive research of each network would be a waist of time, Most networks claim to have at least 90% + coverage of the nation. I guess one solution or investigation could be that the programmers that built the software placed phones onto a platform that had already lost the knowledge and tech adavantage needed to complete the platfroms security, It's a simple fact that Knowone owns the air space and that each devided so called platforms that mobiles work on have breached that space, so where does leave the money spinners in the programming world. 03
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