Notices
Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Help deciding on a college(online) for a CS degree!

  1. #1 Help deciding on a college(online) for a CS degree! 
    New Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    1
    hmmmm


    Last edited by ericg570; February 7th, 2013 at 07:11 AM.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    8
    hello eric!

    good to see that you are super stoked on computer science and even cooler that you're looking for online degrees. sometimes it's what is best for people with busy lives and can't spend all day in front of computers.

    i would try to stray away from sites such as: http://www.onlinecomputersciencedegree.com/ as they tend to have a broader range of schools. try out colorado technical university: http://www.coloradotech.edu/ or university of phoenix: http://www.phoenix.edu/ are some pretty popular ones. But actually, this look like a good resource of schools: http://www.guidetoonlineschools.com/...r_science.html

    good luck in your search!


    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    1
    One of the schools that I can suggest for an online CS degree is Stevens-Henager. Itís one of the oldest colleges in Utah and has a good reputation. It started offering its Computer Science degree online just recently. I checked it out and there is no difference in the curriculum of the online and classroom versions of the program.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope MagiMaster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    3,440
    I can't tell if you're being serious, joking or spamming. In any case, no, I won't help you find fake degrees. Degrees are meant to be earned.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    6
    I'd agree with MagiMaster,you'll learn how to program but none of these "degrees" are accredited by any meaningful program or the department of education. So most companies will simply look at what you learned there and consider whatever "degree" you get as meaningless.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    6
    BTW, rule of thumb when getting a degree, if the degree you're getting is from a for-profit school. RUN.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7  
    New Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1
    As an online student at Baker, almost having completed my BS in CS/Database Technologies, I am glad to answer your questions. First, Baker Online is fully accredited. You should check the accreditation of any school that you are thinking about going to by visiting U.S. Department of Education Database of Accredited Postsecondary Institutions and ProgramsAlthough you may think that a regionally accredited school is "better" than a nationally accredited school, it is often more difficult to transfer credits from a regionally accredited school to another college. You should consider this when choosing the college that you want to attend. If you won't be able to finish your degree, it will be difficult to go to another school without starting over. With that being said, I had trouble transferring credits from Texas A&M to NMSU, so I think that schools are in general becoming less excited about accepting transfer credits, although Baker was pretty liberal in their transfer policies. I did have to argue with them to accept my Calculus credits for Trigonometry, since I skipped Trig at Texas A&M because I tested out of it.

    I've taken 21 classes so far at Baker and I have 11 more to go for my bachelors. I transferred in 16 classes, which took care of most of my 100 and 200 level classes. Just like in a bricks and mortar classroom, you have good instructors and instructors that are less than good. I would say that 3/4 of my classes have been taught by Doctorates, the other 1/4 were taught by Master's degrees. I've never had a class that was taught by a professor (or instructor) with a Bachelor's degree. I've learned a lot. I've also skated through some classes. It's up to you what you get from the class and I'll admit that the classes that don't really apply to my degree don't interest me very much so I tend to take them less seriously.

    Don't get me wrong, I still work very, very hard on my classes. Most of my classes require about 20 hours a week of reading, studying, completing assignments and doing research. I am on the President's list and plan on graduating Magna cum Laude. Keeping my school work up to this level takes a tremendous amount of effort on my part. It is not a degree mill, you will work very hard to obtain your degree. Going to school online is very different from going in a face-to-face environment, and anyone who thinks that going to school online is easy is crazy. You must be self motivated, dedicated to a schedule and have the ability to use technology to it's fullest. You must be technically literate, and I can't emphasize this enough. You will need to do research on your own to find out how to install Oracle 11g on your Windows 7 system. The professor will help, but by the time you are in these classes you should have the knowledge to solve problems on your own.

    I love going to Baker, and am really insulted by anyone who would say that this is a degree mill or that it is not accredited. Since I used to do the hiring at my previous company, I can tell you that no employer cares whether you went to school online or in the classroom. What they care about is that your school is accredited and that you learned.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #8  
    Forum Sophomore
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    133
    abcdefghij
    Last edited by sploit; August 16th, 2011 at 10:03 PM. Reason: Not a productive post
    - sploit -
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •