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Thread: How are freshly made chips programmed?

  1. #1 How are freshly made chips programmed? 
    Forum Bachelors Degree Waveman28's Avatar
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    When a new computer is manufactured, the machine code must somehow be written onto the memory. How is this done? I remember that the very first computers used to use punch cards to achieve this, but now what?


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  3. #2  
    Forum Freshman freeyourmind's Avatar
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    They are flashed.

    Like, when you flash a new version of BIOS into your motherboard or in some cases GPUs. I believe its achieved by a small controlled burst of electricity.


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  4. #3 Re: How are freshly made chips programmed? 
    Forum Masters Degree Twit of wit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Waveman28
    When a new computer is manufactured, the machine code must somehow be written onto the memory. How is this done? I remember that the very first computers used to use punch cards to achieve this, but now what?
    DVD, bluray, internet...
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  5. #4 Re: How are freshly made chips programmed? 
    Forum Freshman freeyourmind's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Twit of wit
    Quote Originally Posted by Waveman28
    When a new computer is manufactured, the machine code must somehow be written onto the memory. How is this done? I remember that the very first computers used to use punch cards to achieve this, but now what?
    DVD, bluray, internet...
    No dude

    Hes not talking about installing an OS or game. Hes talking about going right back to where the components receive the ability to do what they do and read the information correctly. Right back to binary and 010101011101010 coms.

    Flashed dude. Parts and flashed with hardcode for BOIS, binary, and manufacturing information.
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  6. #5 Re: How are freshly made chips programmed? 
    Forum Masters Degree Twit of wit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by freeyourmind
    Quote Originally Posted by Twit of wit
    Quote Originally Posted by Waveman28
    When a new computer is manufactured, the machine code must somehow be written onto the memory. How is this done? I remember that the very first computers used to use punch cards to achieve this, but now what?
    DVD, bluray, internet...
    No dude

    Hes not talking about installing an OS or game. Hes talking about going right back to where the components receive the ability to do what they do and read the information correctly. Right back to binary and 010101011101010 coms.

    Flashed dude. Parts and flashed with hardcode for BOIS, binary, and manufacturing information.
    No, punchcards served the same purpose as DVD and bluray today.
    The ability to do what they do is hardwired to them. Everything else is software. "Flashed" means writing software to chip's flash memory.
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  7. #6 Re: How are freshly made chips programmed? 
    Forum Junior Steiner101's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Twit of wit
    No, punchcards served the same purpose as DVD and bluray today.
    The ability to do what they do is hardwired to them. Everything else is software. "Flashed" means writing software to chip's flash memory.
    computers and most electronic devices aren't manufactured "hard wired" to know how to boot, or do anything atall frankly.
    They contain programmable ROM's on the motherboard or PCB and are flashed with the code in the factory.
    The backbone of all electronic devices (including computers) contain a family of programmable chips like PROM or EEPROM in order to store factory shipped firmware that actually allows the device to work. This is not regarded as software, it is firmware and is stored on chips in the device. "Software" is the guff you install to hard drives, or other storage that is not actually part of the circuit.

    The OP specifically asked about how code is present on newly manufactured computers and microchips. That process is done in the factory and is called flashing. None of the things you listed have anything to do with manufacturing.
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  8. #7  
    Forum Masters Degree Twit of wit's Avatar
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    Firmware is software. BIOS is software. "Flashing" means just copying this software to the flash memory present on the chip. It's not different from copying data to a USB flash drive.
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  9. #8  
    Forum Junior Steiner101's Avatar
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    It's not different from copying data to a USB flash drive.
    I didn't say it was different from that, if EEPROM is used it is exactly the same type of chip as the ones in memory sticks. Most xbox hacks, for example, involve flashing hacked firmware to the EEPROM using a DIY connection to their computer.

    The point is that virtually no devices nowadays come "hard wired" to do anything. If you bought a Blu-ray player with no firmware flashed to it you would quickly find you bought an expensive paperweight. That's not to say custom chips with the code hard wired couldn't be made, but it would be expensive and impractical.
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  10. #9  
    Forum Masters Degree Twit of wit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by harvestein
    It's not different from copying data to a USB flash drive.
    I didn't say it was different from that, if EEPROM is used it is exactly the same type of chip as the ones in memory sticks. Most xbox hacks, for example, involve flashing hacked firmware to the EEPROM using a DIY connection to their computer.

    The point is that virtually no devices nowadays come "hard wired" to do anything. If you bought a Blu-ray player with no firmware flashed to it you would quickly find you bought an expensive paperweight. That's not to say custom chips with the code hard wired couldn't be made, but it would be expensive and impractical.
    All chips are hardwired enough to run the firmware, I think it's quite obvious.
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