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Thread: Java and Visual Studio

  1. #1 Java and Visual Studio 
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    Dear All

    I work in construction mgmt. I want to pursue a career in developing software solutions and decision support systems for construction firms.
    Which path should I take now? Java or Visual Studio? or something else?
    I need to figure out which of them to study so I can decide on a course.
    I know this is a question from someone less than a beginner. I will appreciate the enlightenment very much.


    think outside the earth
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  3. #2  
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    I am a beginner with the concepts of computer science as well. your choice between visual studio (c++) and java are preference, as ive been told. I decided to learn C first, before jumping into C++ and Java which utilizes object oriented concepts, I wanted to understand the basics of programming first. If you are in a hurry to jump into the field, it may be difficult to follow OOP concepts at first, so id recommend looking into C or BASIC or other languages which are easier to follow.


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  4. #3  
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    I recommend learning enough C and Java to be able to write simple programs and understand the basics of software development. C because it is pretty-much the UR-syntax of many other languages (Java included), and it puts you fairly close to the machine so you get some idea of how things work, functions, variables, addresses, pointers, stacks, yadayada. Java because it is a "simplified" Object (dis)Oriented language that is not as hard to use as C++, where you can learn about OO techniques and architectures which are very useful in real software. Edsger Dijkstra and I both recommend that you give BASIC a wide berth, as it destroys your mind for learning real programming.

    Wikibooks and java.sun.com have pretty good online manuals and tutorials for many languages. Look into the Eclipse IDE (Integrated Development Environment), a free version of a Visual Studio thingie, originally for Java but now supporting a number of other languages as well.

    Your objective applications are more likely to be very high level, using databases, math tools, and various kinds of modeling software -- with which I am not familiar. They may involve cobbling together existing programs like Excel and Project with your own application "glue" more than down and dirty programming. You can probably find some examples of similar tools that you can poke at to see how they are constructed and let that lead you to what languages and techniques you need to learn after you get your feet wet with the basics.
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  5. #4  
    WYSIWYG Moderator marnixR's Avatar
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    the problem with Visual Studio is that you need a licence, and you'll need to upgrade from time to time as the server gets upgraded

    having said that, from .NET 2.0 Microsoft has finally caught up with the functionality of Java, and from the point of view of C# as a language, there's very little to choose between the 2
    "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away." (Philip K. Dick)
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  6. #5  
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    Thank you all for replying

    As schip666 put very well:
    "Your objective applications are more likely to be very high level, using databases, math tools, and various kinds of modeling software -- with which I am not familiar. They may involve cobbling together existing programs like Excel and Project with your own application "glue" more than down and dirty programming. You can probably find some examples of similar tools that you can poke at to see how they are constructed and let that lead you to what languages and techniques you need to learn after you get your feet wet with the basics."

    I was hoping I could use Java to "cobble together" SQL database, VBA for excel, Project Management Software and Drawings.

    So I guess I'll start with Java for now, and see where that takes me.

    Thanks again. If you can give any more guidance please do.
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  7. #6  
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    Java may not be the glue you need. If you are mostly looking to tie various Microsoft products together I'd bet either C++, at a lower level, or Visual Basic (ugh...but that's only a prejudice on my part...) are the paths of least resistance. If it's more web based, then Java and LAMP -- Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP/Perl -- could unhook you from the Redmond Behemoth.
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  8. #7  
    WYSIWYG Moderator marnixR's Avatar
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    ASP.NET is quite good at doing all the things you have in mind - haven't used Java to the same extent, so can't really say whether it's easier or not, but since ASP.NET (and .NET apps, come think of it) are developed in Visual Studio, and these Microsoft products are likely to fit in well with other Microsoft products such as SQL (although .NET is equally good at accessing other data sources such as Oracle, Oracle RDB, PI etc) and Excel
    "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away." (Philip K. Dick)
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