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Thread: Copying Thunderbird folders

  1. #1 Copying Thunderbird folders 
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    How I copy my local TB folders from one machine to another, both running under Ubuntuu?

    PS I have, of course, a flash drive


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  3. #2  
    Forum Ph.D. Darius's Avatar
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    You spend an hour attempting to navigate the grossly incoherent file structure, spend 2 more looking for a forum with a solution only to post the problem yourself, a few hours or days depending on wait punctuated by repeated attempts to locate a simple folder for transfer (that is never listed IN the program itself), get bogus answers a few hours/days later, keep trying to find ANY answers/updates to remedy problems found along the way, still cannot figure out the incoherent file system, all programs to automagically solve the issue don't work with your build/are broken/are fucking retarded, format your hard drive and return to windows.

    Oh, wait, that was me over the course of a few months.

    UBUNTU - Not even once.


    Om mani padme hum

    "In dishonorable things we are not bound to obey any man." - The Book of the Courtier [1561], pg 99 (144 in pdf)
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  4. #3  
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    Thanks Darius, that was really helpful. Next problem I have I'll come straight to you for PRACTICAL advice
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  5. #4  
    Forum Ph.D. Darius's Avatar
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    Hey, "uninstall Ubuntu and install Windows" is pretty practical. Your productivity will go up over 9000 percent.
    Om mani padme hum

    "In dishonorable things we are not bound to obey any man." - The Book of the Courtier [1561], pg 99 (144 in pdf)
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  6. #5  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard SkinWalker's Avatar
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    Simply back up your profile folders to a USB dongle. Then import them or copy/paste them to the same folders of the new Ubuntu machine.

    This profile folder should be under ~/.thunderbird/xxxxxxxx.default/

    You should have a "Mail" and/or an "ImapMail" folder. Within these folders should be your mail files in pairs. "INBOX" without an extension and "INBOX.msf." These pairs should exist for each folder you have within TB and they're in standard mbox format.

    Moving them is actually easier in Linux than in Windows, since there are a couple of different places the profile folder can reside in Microsoft OS. Since the "thunderbird" folder is preceded with a "." you'll need to check the "view hidden files" box in Nautilus, Thunar, Dolphin, etc.

    I upgraded from XP to Ubuntu about two years ago and rarely ever load windows these days. I currently have a dual boot between Ubuntu Jaunty and Vista, but the wife and kid aren't all that computer literate, so they're more comfortable in Linux than Windows. That couldn't be said just two years ago.
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  7. #6  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard SkinWalker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darius
    Hey, "uninstall Ubuntu and install Windows" is pretty practical. Your productivity will go up over 9000 percent.
    Why? Can you cite a source to that figure? I can't imagine my productivity changing by any positive integer by making such a move.

    In fact, I highly recommend Ubuntu's latest release (it's on a 6-month schedule -new release every 6-months) to even the most novice of computer users. It's far more stable than Windows, loads 3 times as fast (on my machine anyway), has a wide breadth of software for all but the most obscure niches, is far more customizable and personal, far less resource-intensive. One of my favorite features: updates are painless, quick and don't bog your system down. And you never have to restart your system unless it's a kernel update and even then only if you want to start using the new kernel right away.

    I've been a Windows supporter since Windows 3.11 and I even used a 2.x version in 1987. I thought Win 95 was an engineering marvel. I played around with Linux all those years off and on as well but always stuck by Windows. Windows still has it uses for me (I use ARCGIS on it for my GIS work on occasion), but I go weeks without ever booting into Windows since the last three releases of Ubuntu. Ubuntu Karmic promises to be an even better, easier to manage release.

    And you can't beat the price.
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  8. #7  
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    Quote Originally Posted by SkinWalker
    Why? Can you cite a source to that figure? I can't imagine my productivity changing by any positive integer by making such a move.
    It's a combination of its horrible interface, the fact ALMOST NOBODY FOLLOWS THE GODDAMN GNOME HUMAN INTERFACE GUIDELINES, and the fact it takes hours (weeks, months) just to customize the interface to your liking. Honestly, with all the hours you just INVESTED into beating down Ubuntu to your liking, only to discover you can't beat it to your liking, you could have been doing something useful. Then again, I am significantly more picky than anyone else I've seen, and return volumes of interface issues where a normal user would go "this is fine".

    In fact, I highly recommend Ubuntu's latest release (it's on a 6-month schedule -new release every 6-months) to even the most novice of computer users. It's far more stable than Windows, loads 3 times as fast (on my machine anyway), has a wide breadth of software for all but the most obscure niches, is far more customizable and personal, far less resource-intensive. One of my favorite features: updates are painless, quick and don't bog your system down. And you never have to restart your system unless it's a kernel update and even then only if you want to start using the new kernel right away.
    I'm hardly a "novice", and that's the problem. I see all the problems Ubuntu has, and the grand majority of them are from noncompliance with the Gnome Human Interface Guidelines.

    Judging by your general use of the term "windows", I take it you're not that good at using windows machines or properly differentiating them. Windows XP and Ubuntu pretty much run the same in benchmarks, though Ubuntu's interface automatically wins because it's not windows API. As for programs, I initially found Ubuntu's host of free programs to be beneficial, until I discovered most of them are shit and the ones that aren't I could find for Windows.

    Not that it matters, as I use windows 2000. It's the lightest most stable version of Windows ever presented to the public (with SP4, that is). Most users of XP or win2k don't have to reboot constantly, either, and the computers are set to stay up for weeks or months at a time with no issue.

    I've been a Windows supporter since Windows 3.11 and I even used a 2.x version in 1987. I thought Win 95 was an engineering marvel.
    Ahahahaha. I thought Win 95 was an absolute nightmare of a halfassed job. Not only did it contain nowhere near all the features users kept requesting, but the kernel it was based on was fit to explode. On top of this, designers of the win95 days got the "bright idea" to add a "HURRRR WRONG OS!" message if your OS wasn't win95. That jackassery practice has continued long into the modern era, and damn well ensures I can't play AoE3 until I hack the shit out of it (and after I do, SURPRISE, I CAN PLAY!).

    I played around with Linux all those years off and on as well but always stuck by Windows. Windows still has it uses for me (I use ARCGIS on it for my GIS work on occasion), but I go weeks without ever booting into Windows since the last three releases of Ubuntu. Ubuntu Karmic promises to be an even better, easier to manage release.

    And you can't beat the price.
    I spent months learning all about Ubuntu, and in the end I went back to win2k. The fact I am still using such an old operating system says something about the modern world. Honestly, if my hardware was newer, I'd probably suffer dual booting with windows XP and Ubuntu, but currently neither give me anything win2k does not.
    Om mani padme hum

    "In dishonorable things we are not bound to obey any man." - The Book of the Courtier [1561], pg 99 (144 in pdf)
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  9. #8  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard SkinWalker's Avatar
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    All I can say is I have a precisely opposite opinion of nearly every comment you made.

    Ubuntu "out of the box" runs fine and is looks good. I used Win2k from 2000 to about 2006. I still have it, but XP runs better. More stable? Now.. no differences in stability that I can tell between 2K & XP.

    I like Windows. Use it all the time at work and occasionally at home. I prefer Ubuntu only because its a superior OS. And far easier to use.

    If the new Windows version due out soon is runs better, I'll likely switch back or at least spend more time on it than Ubuntu.

    I suppose there are fanatics and zealots out there who align themselves ideologically with an OS like its a religion, with no real reason for their preferences other than zealotry, but I'm not one of them. I let my experiences and personal comfort guide my choice of OS.
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  10. #9  
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    Frankly I find the "Windows vs Linux" debate pretty barren - it's a matter of taste, and what you use your rig for. Personally I prefer Linux for speed, lack of clutter, relatively low risk of infection, and the fact that I am not using Microsoft products (this is, of course, an ideological stance on my part). If I were a gamer, maybe I might feel differently. However........
    Quote Originally Posted by SkinWalker
    Simply back up your profile folders to a USB dongle. Then import them or copy/paste them to the same folders of the new Ubuntu machine.
    ....it's not quite that simple.

    I had to edit my "profiles.ini" file to read my imported "xxxxx.default" folder, then go back to "Account settings" and change the "Local folder" for saving new messages.

    But thanks for your help, all is looking good now
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