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Thread: Does baking soda put in water create hydrogen vapors?

  1. #1 Does baking soda put in water create hydrogen vapors? 
    Forum Cosmic Wizard icewendigo's Avatar
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    just wondering


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  3. #2  
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    No, absolutely not.

    All you get is a solution of baking soda.


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  4. #3 Re: Does baking soda put in water create hydrogen vapors? 
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    Quote Originally Posted by icewendigo
    just wondering
    No. Any bubbles you see are CO2 or simply air trapped in the powder. You'll get more CO2 bubbles if the water is acidic - for example if you add vinegar to it.
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  5. #4 Re: Does baking soda put in water create hydrogen vapors? 
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    Quote Originally Posted by icewendigo
    just wondering

    They used to use baking soda to stop timber mold. This I have documentation for.

    Years ago there were some that thought the formula for baking soda was NaCL2

    It had something to do with Latin. And sodium being called phenol, and barbital being or meaning two chlorine atoms, in Latin.

    Now that might seem off topic, and totally wrong however, it meant something to a chemist. We were called in, to remove his chemicals from his laboratory. He had died. We did a standard lab pack, for disposal. Some of the chemicals and his work made it into my collection. Ha-ha.

    Some of his research was fascinating. I cannot say if it is correct, with any proof, however I have always been fascinated by the possibility.

    I liked the way he tracked it down. And some of the proof seemed feasible if only enough to check it out. I lost the work from this fellow during my divorce. However it always stuck with me.

    I have seen chemical formulas change here in my Area almost over night. So I am not real firm about to many chemicals. Ha-ha. That is why I am always on the hunt for inconsistencies.

    I was reading about a mishap in a hospital where, sodium Fluoride was used instead of sodium chloride and I believe around 157 people died. So it is possible to confuse chemicals to the point of death.





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    William McCormick
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  6. #5  
    Forum Masters Degree organic god's Avatar
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    wow i wonder how anyone could divorce you.
    everything is mathematical.
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    Quote Originally Posted by organic god
    wow i wonder how anyone could divorce you.

    That is what I said!

    I would make explosives, flares and powerful chemical reactions, outside the house at 9:30 pm when I got done with my second job. With my son who was actually still two years old at the time.

    He would run out of the house. Yelling dad, dad can we make powerful explosives?

    The neighbors loved us, or were to afraid to complain. Ha-ha.

    I think I am a lot of fun.


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    William McCormick
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  8. #7 Re: Does baking soda put in water create hydrogen vapors? 
    Forum Cosmic Wizard i_feel_tiredsleepy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by William McCormick
    Quote Originally Posted by icewendigo
    just wondering

    They used to use baking soda to stop timber mold. This I have documentation for.

    Years ago there were some that thought the formula for baking soda was NaCL2

    It had something to do with Latin. And sodium being called phenol, and barbital being or meaning two chlorine atoms, in Latin.

    Now that might seem off topic, and totally wrong however, it meant something to a chemist. We were called in, to remove his chemicals from his laboratory. He had died. We did a standard lab pack, for disposal. Some of the chemicals and his work made it into my collection. Ha-ha.

    Some of his research was fascinating. I cannot say if it is correct, with any proof, however I have always been fascinated by the possibility.

    I liked the way he tracked it down. And some of the proof seemed feasible if only enough to check it out. I lost the work from this fellow during my divorce. However it always stuck with me.

    I have seen chemical formulas change here in my Area almost over night. So I am not real firm about to many chemicals. Ha-ha. That is why I am always on the hunt for inconsistencies.

    I was reading about a mishap in a hospital where, sodium Fluoride was used instead of sodium chloride and I believe around 157 people died. So it is possible to confuse chemicals to the point of death.





    Sincerely,


    William McCormick
    I suspect those chemist were very poorly educated since it has been know for about 200 years that baking soda was produced from sodium carbonate and carbon dioxide, moreover I'm sure some scientist at one point would have attempted to get chloride out of a solution of baking soda and concluded that there was none there quite easily. Unless of course you are over 200 years old and predate modern chemistry.

    Also, sodium in latin is natrium, thus the periodic table symbol being Na, although I supose it was a clever little joke of yours to break down the drug phenolbarbital >.>
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  9. #8 Re: Does baking soda put in water create hydrogen vapors? 
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    Quote Originally Posted by i_feel_tiredsleepy
    Quote Originally Posted by William McCormick
    Quote Originally Posted by icewendigo
    just wondering

    They used to use baking soda to stop timber mold. This I have documentation for.

    Years ago there were some that thought the formula for baking soda was NaCL2

    It had something to do with Latin. And sodium being called phenol, and barbital being or meaning two chlorine atoms, in Latin.

    Now that might seem off topic, and totally wrong however, it meant something to a chemist. We were called in, to remove his chemicals from his laboratory. He had died. We did a standard lab pack, for disposal. Some of the chemicals and his work made it into my collection. Ha-ha.

    Some of his research was fascinating. I cannot say if it is correct, with any proof, however I have always been fascinated by the possibility.

    I liked the way he tracked it down. And some of the proof seemed feasible if only enough to check it out. I lost the work from this fellow during my divorce. However it always stuck with me.

    I have seen chemical formulas change here in my Area almost over night. So I am not real firm about to many chemicals. Ha-ha. That is why I am always on the hunt for inconsistencies.

    I was reading about a mishap in a hospital where, sodium Fluoride was used instead of sodium chloride and I believe around 157 people died. So it is possible to confuse chemicals to the point of death.





    Sincerely,


    William McCormick
    I suspect those chemist were very poorly educated since it has been know for about 200 years that baking soda was produced from sodium carbonate and carbon dioxide, moreover I'm sure some scientist at one point would have attempted to get chloride out of a solution of baking soda and concluded that there was none there quite easily. Unless of course you are over 200 years old and predate modern chemistry.

    Also, sodium in latin is natrium, thus the periodic table symbol being Na, although I supose it was a clever little joke of yours to break down the drug phenolbarbital >.>
    Besides the Na2Co3 as listed, in the soda ash, they use massive amounts of table salt, in the process, on the way to make baking soda.

    I suspect that it could indeed be a similar misunderstanding like ammonia being NH3, when it was well known that nitrogen is almost inert. Meaning that it would probably not want anything to do with hydrogen.

    When I went to school our school labs were stocked with Malincrodt Anhydrous (water free) Ammonia that was labeled NO2. It would create a brown gas if left with the stopper off.

    There are other ferric chloride reactions that can work in two ways. You can add either more iron or more hydrochloric acid to strengthen the etching solution. One drops out some of the iron, to strengthen the solution, the other just strengthens the solution.


    They also use ammonia and, CO2, to make soda ash, and the ammonia may supply oxygen, that might bond with a sodium atom. Causing a free chlorine atom, making Baking soda NaCl2.

    But the only mass is the table salt.

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    William McCormick
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  10. #9 Re: Does baking soda put in water create hydrogen vapors? 
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    Quote Originally Posted by William McCormick
    Besides the Na2Co3 as listed, in the soda ash, they use massive amounts of table salt, in the process, on the way to make baking soda.

    I suspect that it could indeed be a similar misunderstanding like ammonia being NH3, when it was well known that nitrogen is almost inert. Meaning that it would probably not want anything to do with hydrogen.

    When I went to school our school labs were stocked with Malincrodt Anhydrous (water free) Ammonia that was labeled NO2. It would create a brown gas if left with the stopper off.

    There are other ferric chloride reactions that can work in two ways. You can add either more iron or more hydrochloric acid to strengthen the etching solution. One drops out some of the iron, to strengthen the solution, the other just strengthens the solution.

    They also use ammonia and, CO2, to make soda ash, and the ammonia may supply oxygen, that might bond with a sodium atom. Causing a free chlorine atom, making Baking soda NaCl2.
    I am on the 4th year of my chemistry phd program, and the only thing I can say about the above is:

    WHAT THE F*CK???

    Reading your posts is like trying to make sense of an Escher picture:



    Sometimes parts of it seem to start to make sense, but then they don't - and if you step back and consider the whole thing, it's all nonsensical.
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  11. #10  
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    suspect that it could indeed be a similar misunderstanding like ammonia being NH3, when it was well known that nitrogen is almost inert. Meaning that it would probably not want anything to do with hydrogen.
    you some kind of idiot?

    look at a fulminate explosion that will tell you how inert nitrogen is.

    Reading your posts is lick trying to make sense of an Escher picture:
    lol I second that statement.
    everything is mathematical.
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  12. #11  
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    Quote Originally Posted by organic god
    suspect that it could indeed be a similar misunderstanding like ammonia being NH3, when it was well known that nitrogen is almost inert. Meaning that it would probably not want anything to do with hydrogen.
    you some kind of idiot?

    look at a fulminate explosion that will tell you how inert nitrogen is.

    Reading your posts is lick trying to make sense of an Escher picture:
    lol I second that statement.
    Mercury fulminate is listed as Hg(CNO)2, there is oxygen in there according to that. It is stated that it is made by treating mercury with strong nitric acid and alcohol.

    Nitrogen gas will put out a gasoline fire, stall a car faster then you can shut it off with a key. Nitrogen was used in fire extinguishers for years in my area in gas stations.

    We use Nitrogen in refrigeration to protect the copper from oxidation during brazing. It is almost inert.

    It has also been stated that mercury fulminate is made from chlorination. So someone will have to make some and find out.

    Oxygen is the mean one.

    Nitrous oxide when I used it in my car was marked NO4. It is a wild explosive. Because of all that oxygen.

    http://www.Rockwelder.com/Explosives/blast2.wmv


    That is just a bit of pure oxygen at work, on acetylene. Much under a cubic foot of gas even with the acetylene. That is one mean explosion.

    For a quarter mile radius it sets off car alarms. The only thing that came close were 8 inch mortars being fired, from four foot long pipes. They go up 2,500 feet.

    When the shock wave hits you from that little bag of gas, thirty plus feet away, it actually burns the inside of your chest.

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    William McCormick
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  13. #12  
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    Well as far as i'm cincerned ,superficially, it might be ridiculous


    However, this will probably be a precious hypothesis.....since soda does contain the element of H.
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  14. #13  
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    But BAKing it ,seems to be an extreme way to figure out , even with H2 Vapor.....
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  15. #14 Re: Does baking soda put in water create hydrogen vapors? 
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    Quote Originally Posted by William McCormick
    I suspect that it could indeed be a similar misunderstanding like ammonia being NH3, when it was well known that nitrogen is almost inert. Meaning that it would probably not want anything to do with hydrogen.
    Are you trying to say that you think ammonia isn't really NH3?
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  16. #15  
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    Quote Originally Posted by ArezList
    Well as far as i'm cincerned ,superficially, it might be ridiculous


    However, this will probably be a precious hypothesis.....since soda does contain the element of H.
    So does practically every organic molecule on Eath...
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  17. #16  
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    inert means not chemically active.

    considering all the nitrogen compounds you have listed it seems strange that an inert gas would form so many compounds.

    Nitrogen gas N<sub>2</sub> is almost inert, but it can be made to react and therefore would form the NH3 compound ammonia
    everything is mathematical.
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  18. #17 Re: Does baking soda put in water create hydrogen vapors? 
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    Quote Originally Posted by icewendigo
    just wondering

    Yes anything with sodium in it can release hydrogen and oxygen gas. Especially where metals that like the oxygen more then sodium are concerned.

    Dried a sodium compound may be hijacked of its oxygen or chlorine. Or they may just switch places between the sodium and other element.

    Later moisture comes along and reacts with the free sodium. Releasing hydrogen and oxygen.

    Whole railings that were treated with sodium hydroxide Na2O that is put into a solution of water. Heated and allowed to react with aluminum. Later these railings detonated and vanished. Even after rinsing. There was just enough residue left.

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    William McCormick
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    Quote Originally Posted by organic god
    inert means not chemically active.

    considering all the nitrogen compounds you have listed it seems strange that an inert gas would form so many compounds.

    Nitrogen gas N<sub>2</sub> is almost inert, but it can be made to react and therefore would form the NH3 compound ammonia

    Rule number one, elements are the elements. You cannot alter them. You cannot make them do anything different then what they are.

    They actually use a fission and fusion process to make ammonia, to add a hydrogen atom to a nitrogen atom to get an oxygen atom. Under extreme pressure and heat.

    Then they can continue it and get Nitric acid.


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    William McCormick
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  20. #19  
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    so by your argument clearly nitrogen does react. therefore it is not inert.






    They actually use a fission and fusion process to make ammonia, to add a hydrogen atom to a nitrogen atom to get an oxygen atom. Under extreme pressure and heat.

    Then they can continue it and get Nitric acid.
    you really know nothing about chemistry do you.
    everything is mathematical.
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  21. #20  
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    Quote Originally Posted by organic god
    so by your argument clearly nitrogen does react. therefore it is not inert.






    They actually use a fission and fusion process to make ammonia, to add a hydrogen atom to a nitrogen atom to get an oxygen atom. Under extreme pressure and heat.

    Then they can continue it and get Nitric acid.
    you really know nothing about chemistry do you.
    It would be nice to just ignore William, but the thought of someone comming by and reading these outright lies and believing them is a little bit horrifying. For Christ sake he called sodium hydroxide Na2O >.>, when anyone who even payed attention in highschool chemistry would know NaOH is sodium hydroxide.

    Now it is quite obvious William spreads these lies on purpose and doesn't believe them, sometimes it's amusing, but for the most part I find it really annoying.
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    Quote Originally Posted by organic god
    so by your argument clearly nitrogen does react. therefore it is not inert.






    They actually use a fission and fusion process to make ammonia, to add a hydrogen atom to a nitrogen atom to get an oxygen atom. Under extreme pressure and heat.

    Then they can continue it and get Nitric acid.
    you really know nothing about chemistry do you.
    Nitrogen chemically combines with oxygen. You will find that all real compounds that contain nitrogen also contain oxygen.

    It is still a rather weak bond. That is why it is associated with explosions. Because it readily releases oxygen upon heating.

    The benz in my opinion are caused by the release of oxygen O1 caused by nitrogen letting go of the oxygen upon decompression. It used to be called the Benz, today they call it DCS Decompression Sickness.

    Just look at the premise that nitrogen is taken into the blood stream as nitrogen gas, while you are under the pressure of the deep sea. And as it decompresses it turns into bubbles. It was a gas when it went in, and it did not hurt you.
    It must have been holding onto something, or something that should have been expelled from the body was attached to the nitrogen, and rendered harmless. It makes no sense that it goes in gaseous under high pressure and then goes gaseous under low pressure.

    Oxygen O1 is a powerful acid to the body. If it is released in the body it will cause the benz or DCS symptoms. Ammonia would probably simulate the benz.

    What takes place is nitrogen N2 absorbs some oxygen. And while under pressure absorbs more oxygen then when hot. Pressure simulates cooling. When you surface you create an effect similar to heating, you create an expansion. Of the nitrogen contaminated with oxygen. The nitrogen or the oxygen lets go. The oxygen O1 hurts bad.

    Speed shops sold liquid nitrous oxide as NO4 for years, here on the Island. I used to use a forty pound bottle in 43 seconds in my car. You could flame the tires, after the car was moving at 20 miles an hour. ON a stock street car. Nitrogen will put out fires and stall a car. Oxygen will make it go, because you can add more fuel into the cylinder.

    That is how nitrous oxide systems work. You have one solenoid that pumps in the nitrous and the other that dumps in massive amount of fuel that will just stall the car without nitrous. It is the oxygen that makes it go.

    They have nitrogen fire extinguishers.

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  23. #22  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard i_feel_tiredsleepy's Avatar
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    Or it could be caused by the fact that at lower pressures your blood can absorb more gas.
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    Quote Originally Posted by i_feel_tiredsleepy
    Or it could be caused by the fact that at lower pressures your blood can absorb more gas.
    By what principle or bond? What is it bonding with at high pressure and not bonding with at low pressure.

    I am not disputing that it is going gaseous upon decompression. I am saying why is it going gaseous. What is it releasing or being released from.

    CO2 like in soda must like to bond at increased pressure with water or something in water. What is it bonding to at increased pressure. What is it releasing at decreased pressure?

    But in the case of soda it goes in as a liquid under pressure. I believe the same would have to be somewhat true of nitrogen. You can only get in so much. Evidently enough.

    But I still stand on, this, that when the bonds with whatever is holding it, more then likely oxygen, are broken, the dangerous compound is oxygen.

    Here is something else to ponder. Breath in soda water gas. It is chocking carbonic acid. No longer pure CO2. Because pure CO2 is a pleasure to breath in. Actually almost refreshing, when gotten in liquid commercial form in special tanks.



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  25. #24  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard i_feel_tiredsleepy's Avatar
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    It's Henry's Law http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry%27s_Law it is a property of all liquids not of water.
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    Quote Originally Posted by i_feel_tiredsleepy
    It's Henry's Law http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry%27s_Law it is a property of all liquids not of water.

    CO2 does not come out of soda water. Carbonic acid comes out of soda water. Yet pure CO2 went in.

    There has to be some bonding there. Dissolve would mean to form a solution. A solution is a chemical bond. A mixture is not a chemical bond.

    If I dissolve food dye in water, it can be frozen and will maintain a uniform color. There is a bond present. If I boil off the water, the die will probably stay in the pot. While the water boils off. This breaks the bond.

    The water vapor often takes dye or some portion of the dye with it.

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    William McCormick
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