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Thread: ABSOLUTE ZERO

  1. #1 ABSOLUTE ZERO 
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    If you left a bottle of water in pitch black space, so far away from anything that no light could be seen, would the water reach absolute zero?


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    no the watter would freeze to -270 degrease below normal 0 achiveing absolute 0 is a very hard thing to do i think the lowest ever tempachure ever recorded was 2.7k


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    How would this happen? I don't understand the relation between light and absolute zero that you're trying to make.
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    No because the water is in thermal equilibrium with itself. How could it reach zero if there is nothing to cool it? I'm not sure which law of thermodynamics this is reffering to, but I'm guessing the second.

    But still its in the middle of nowhere so I dunno, it could reach 0K for all I know .
    "If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe". - Carl Sagan
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  6. #5  
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    Wouldn't it radiate heat into the void until it reached equilibrium with the background radiation? And if the space would lack background radiation, wouldn't it eventually reach 0K? I don't know for sure, though, might confuse things.
    ...Wait, what?
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    empty space is -270F so im realy shure that it wouldent hit 0k but enythings possable i gess
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  8. #7  
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    Quote Originally Posted by 425 Chaotic Requisition
    No because the water is in thermal equilibrium with itself. How could it reach zero if there is nothing to cool it? I'm not sure which law of thermodynamics this is reffering to, but I'm guessing the second.

    But still its in the middle of nowhere so I dunno, it could reach 0K for all I know .
    I meant space as in "outer space" like as in star trek space kind of space, but in the middle of no where so that it would be in the dead cold of space.and it would be so far from anything that no light could see it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Always_growing
    Quote Originally Posted by 425 Chaotic Requisition
    No because the water is in thermal equilibrium with itself. How could it reach zero if there is nothing to cool it? I'm not sure which law of thermodynamics this is reffering to, but I'm guessing the second.

    But still its in the middle of nowhere so I dunno, it could reach 0K for all I know .
    I meant space as in "outer space" like as in star trek space kind of space, but in the middle of no where so that it would be in the dead cold of space.and it would be so far from anything that no light could see it.
    1. It is not possible to attain Absolute Zero.

    2. Water, or any substance in a hard vacuum with no light sources, will eventually radiate enough heat to reach a temperature close to 0 K.

    3. The famous background radiation of the universe sits at approx 2.7 K, which is very low, and an indication of the sort of temperatures that can be reached over time (although in this case, the reduction in temeprature is more due to the expansion of the universe).
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  10. #9  
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    Quote Originally Posted by sunshinewarrio
    Quote Originally Posted by Always_growing
    Quote Originally Posted by 425 Chaotic Requisition
    No because the water is in thermal equilibrium with itself. How could it reach zero if there is nothing to cool it? I'm not sure which law of thermodynamics this is reffering to, but I'm guessing the second.

    But still its in the middle of nowhere so I dunno, it could reach 0K for all I know .
    I meant space as in "outer space" like as in star trek space kind of space, but in the middle of no where so that it would be in the dead cold of space.and it would be so far from anything that no light could see it.
    1. It is not possible to attain Absolute Zero.

    2. Water, or any substance in a hard vacuum with no light sources, will eventually radiate enough heat to reach a temperature close to 0 K.

    3. The famous background radiation of the universe sits at approx 2.7 K, which is very low, and an indication of the sort of temperatures that can be reached over time (although in this case, the reduction in temeprature is more due to the expansion of the universe).
    Yes, a quote in a quote in a quote...

    Actually, it is possible to attain Absolute zero...
    The reason that the universe is 2.7 K is because there is still some background radiation from the Big bang...
    In about 120 billion years, because of the theory of an open universe, all energy will be GONE from the universe... (probably changed into another form, since energy can't just dissappear...)
    After that, background radiation would eventually dissipate...

    If that doesn't get you, how about the space outside the universe...
    How can you say that the space OUTSIDE THE UNIVERSE can't reach absolute zero? (Yes, i know you people will nag at me, nag nag, the universe is an endless curve, nag nag, einstien said so, nag nag... Remember folks, science is essentially putting physiology to the test, and we haven't proved that there ISN'T something outside the universe, just that we haven't found a way to get out... YET...)

    When i say it is possible to reach absolute zero, I say it in a physiological way, not in a purely scientific way... but unless you can surely eliminate it, it is still there...

    Even then, you can still get pretty close... A cryogenics lab has gotten to 3 billionths of a degree above absolute zero...

    People said time travel was impossible...
    All you need is something with a mass of about 10 times that of the sun wound into an infinitely long cylinder, and spinning at about 80,000 rotations a second...
    SCIENCE BOWL RULES AND SO DOES FUEL CELL CAR RACE
    IF ANY OF YOU HAVE HEARD OF IT
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  11. #10  
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    How can you say that the space OUTSIDE THE UNIVERSE can't reach absolute zero? (Yes, i know you people will nag at me, nag nag, the universe is an endless curve, nag nag, einstien said so, nag nag... Remember folks, science is essentially putting physiology to the test, and we haven't proved that there ISN'T something outside the universe, just that we haven't found a way to get out... YET...)
    I don't really follow where you're going by this. The universe is all of space and all of the matter/energy contained therein. How can you say "outside the universe". That's a contradiction of what the universe is. And by physiology do you mean philosophy?
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  12. #11  
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    I think he means since the universe is expanding, it has to be expanding into "something" as far as i know, absolute zero is the point where all matter stops moving, so i don't really thing it's possible to attain this, because no matter how cold you can get it, there will always movement, especially by gravity, which no matter how far you get away from a massive object, or small object, there will always be some type of gravity running interference, meaning that this will somehow affect matter and the atoms inside what you are trying to get to absolute zero.
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  13. #12  
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    i think the lowest ever tempachure ever recorded was 2.7k
    It's my understanding that a Finnish research group reached within a picokelvin (one of those exotic ones!) of Absolute Zero.

    Barry
    Thinking of the question is greater than knowing the answer...
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  14. #13  
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    The Finnish research group did make the world record, but the temperature was 100 picokelvins (0,000 000 000 1 K). That's pretty low.
    Absolute zero is unreachable. That is the third law of thermodynamics, and this law comes from the second law.
    The second law of thermodynamics says that the thermal efficiency must always be smaller than 1.
    I found this formula from my physic book.

    T2 = 0K
    n = Thermal efficiency

    n = 1 - T2/T1
    = 1-0
    = 1

    But remember, n < 1

    P.S. Writing formulas with computer keybord sucks.
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  15. #14  
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    On this subject, I really am outside the so called box, I am probably asking for clarification.

    If after BB, the temperature of space was not 0-K, what was it that cooled space to begin with. Adding space even with 0-K could never get the total space to 0-K. Wouldn't twice the cubic space for the current 2.7, simply drop it to approximately 1.35 and so on down into low fractions, where the total was infinitesimal.

    Space can't create heat and am unaware that it could hold heat or disperse energy which is the effects of decay or mass losing mass. Its energy and requires actual mass to spend it. Nothing material or which could then effect space.

    numb3; Gave you the thought outer space temp, just forgot C, which 273DC is 0-K. (Centigrade)
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