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Thread: Help me! This is so hard!

  1. #1 Help me! This is so hard! 
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    hello everyone my name is Kwesi and I'm new in here could someone help me with my assignment I already research this for 1 week and still I can't find the true answer yay! So help me please.

    List 1 of the practical application of Gas Laws (or Application of Gas Law in Technology)

    1. List
    2. Explain the Science Principle

    Yay I wish my problem will be resolve have fun!


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  3. #2  
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    A gas tank (or gas cylinder) stores a lot of gas by keeping it at very high pressure.Boyle's law says that an increase in pressure causes a decrease in the volume of the gas.


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  4. #3  
    Forum Professor sunshinewarrior's Avatar
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    For homework, there is lots of research you can do yourself on the web.

    Basic Gas Law:

    PV/T = constant

    Where P = Pressure of a fixed mass of gas

    V = Volume of that gas

    T = absolute temperature (measured, for instance, in Kelvin) of the gas.

    A simple everyday demonstration of how this works is in a bicycle pump.

    Hope those are hints enough. The rest should be up to you.

    cheer

    shanks
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  5. #4  
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    Quote Originally Posted by sunshinewarrio
    For homework, there is lots of research you can do yourself on the web.

    Basic Gas Law:

    PV/T = constant

    Where P = Pressure of a fixed mass of gas

    V = Volume of that gas

    T = absolute temperature (measured, for instance, in Kelvin) of the gas.

    A simple everyday demonstration of how this works is in a bicycle pump.

    Hope those are hints enough. The rest should be up to you.

    cheer

    shanks
    DAMMIT! You beat me to the only Chemistry I know half by heart!!!

    Lol.

    How about this:

    Pv=nRT
    "If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe". - Carl Sagan
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  6. #5  
    Forum Professor sunshinewarrior's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by svwillmer
    Quote Originally Posted by sunshinewarrio
    For homework, there is lots of research you can do yourself on the web.

    Basic Gas Law:

    PV/T = constant

    Where P = Pressure of a fixed mass of gas

    V = Volume of that gas

    T = absolute temperature (measured, for instance, in Kelvin) of the gas.

    A simple everyday demonstration of how this works is in a bicycle pump.

    Hope those are hints enough. The rest should be up to you.

    cheer

    shanks
    DAMMIT! You beat me to the only Chemistry I know half by heart!!!

    Lol.

    How about this:

    Pv=nRT
    Apologies. And what's R in this? (Assuming n is the molar constant or some such.)
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  7. #6  
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    The gas constant 8. something
    "If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe". - Carl Sagan
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  8. #7  
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    yay thanks everyone thats a big help I love this forum full of fun and science wahahaha!
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  9. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by rancidchickn
    A gas tank (or gas cylinder) stores a lot of gas by keeping it at very high pressure.Boyle's law says that an increase in pressure causes a decrease in the volume of the gas.
    yay this is a big help thanks!

    Quote Originally Posted by sunshinewarrio
    For homework, there is lots of research you can do yourself on the web.

    Basic Gas Law:

    PV/T = constant

    Where P = Pressure of a fixed mass of gas

    V = Volume of that gas

    T = absolute temperature (measured, for instance, in Kelvin) of the gas.

    A simple everyday demonstration of how this works is in a bicycle pump.

    Hope those are hints enough. The rest should be up to you.

    cheer

    shanks
    thanks for the idea!
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  10. #9  
    ehL
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    Quote Originally Posted by svwillmer
    The gas constant 8. something
    R is the ideal gas constant. It has a value of 0.0821 li-atm/K mole. Meaning P (pressure) must be in "atm", V (volume) be in "liters", and T (temperature) must be in K (kelvin).
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  11. #10  
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    Quote Originally Posted by ehL
    Quote Originally Posted by svwillmer
    The gas constant 8. something
    R is the ideal gas constant. It has a value of 0.0821 li-atm/K mole. Meaning P (pressure) must be in "atm", V (volume) be in "liters", and T (temperature) must be in K (kelvin).
    Jargon for a young student? Tut tut. Kidding :wink:
    "If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe". - Carl Sagan
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  12. #11  
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    lol I know already that but I don't know technologies that has an application of gas law!
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  13. #12  
    ehL
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwesifriends
    lol I know already that but I don't know technologies that has an application of gas law!
    I see. Sorry about that. :wink:
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  14. #13  
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    lol its ok heheheh
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  15. #14 Namastey! 
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    Vacuum Technology, it is the term applied to all processes and physical measurement carried out under conditions of below-normal atmospheric pressure.
    http://www.mcallister.com/vacuum2.html
    On this page you might check it in detail.
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  16. #15  
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    Application of the gas law is thermodynamics rather than chemistry. It turns up in the design of all kinds of industrial equipment such as compressors, pressure vessel, pipelines and heat exhangers. This link describes how the gas law is used in the design of an air compressor, which is a piece of equipment found in just about every industrial process.

    Scroll down a few pages to find a direct reference to the gas law, but read the whole thing if you really want to understand.

    http://www.freestudy.co.uk/thermodynamics/t2201.pdf
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  17. #16  
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    thanks everyone I love it mwah!
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  18. #17  
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    why cant you do your assignment alone
    Fact is fact!
    You cant hide the truth forever!
    I will soon find out!
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  19. #18  
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    Quote Originally Posted by climax
    why cant you do your assignment alone
    Climax, I'll remeber that the next time you ask a question.

    Kwesi, a lot of things in technology (and not only) involve gases being compressed, decompressed, heated or cooled. Or a combination of all of those.

    I am sure people who design car engines (both of the Otto and Diesel variety) spend a lot of time thinking how the air gets compressed in the cylinder prior to fuel injection - especially how hot it gets. You may want to look up "adiabatic compression".Then the fuel gets injected and ignited and the hot combustion gases expand, pushing the piston - another reason to do a lot of maths with the laws of gases. Although I suppose they use some more sophisticated formulas than , because combustion gases are not quite perfect, and as the fuel is still burning even the changes all the time.

    Other things include:
    - steam engines, from Hero's (of Alexandria) aeolipile to Watt's engine to the turbines in a thermal or nuclear power plant;
    - tyres, basketballs and other bouncy inflatable things;
    - air conditioning;
    - meteorology;
    - jet and rocket engines;
    - aerodynamics;
    - the device which produces dry ice without electricity, just connecting to a cylinder of compressed (letting some of the gas expand produces the cold needed to freeze );
    - the suitcase-sized bedside device that separates air to provide a sick person with near-pure oxygen (priceless when you have serious lung problems);
    - -based fire extinguishers;
    - firearms (what happens in a gun barrel is similar to cylinder in an engine) and other uses of explosives; also air guns and paintball "rifles";
    - bag pipes
    - all sorts of foams and aerosols;
    - .... I think by now you're getting the idea and can think of more examples.

    Good luck,
    Leszek.
    Leszek. Pronounced [LEH-sheck]. The wondering Slav.
    History teaches us that we don't learn from history.
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