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  1. #1 how is water created 
    Pep
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    Hi guys I am just a newbie to this forum. Ok I have got a question how is water created eg is it from the atmospheric preasure by forcing the hrydogen and oxgen together or is it created in volcanos or what.


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  3. #2 Re: how is water created 
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pep
    Hi guys I am just a newbie to this forum. Ok I have got a question how is water created eg is it from the atmospheric preasure by forcing the hrydogen and oxgen together or is it created in volcanos or what.
    Good question, never thought about it. Will wait for an answer as well.

    Welcome to the forum.


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    You might have better luck by having an Admin move this thread to Chemistry, but this physicist will take his best crack at it. :wink:

    Water is created in any number of ways. All you have to do is find a chemical reaction in which water is one of the products, and not one of the reactants. One such reaction is (sorry, can't make subscripts on this forum)

    CH4+2O2 --> CO2 + 2H2O

    That is, reacting 1 mole of methane with 2 moles of oxygen gas results in 1 mole of carbon dioxide and 2 moles of (drumroll) water.

    I found that in a 5 min search in my old General Chem book. I'm sure you can turn up many, many more with a more extensive search.
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  5. #4  
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    Sure yah can


    CH<sup>4</sup>+2O<sup>2</sup> --> CO<sup>2</sup> + 2H<sup>2</sup>O

    Code:
    CH<sup>4</sup>+2O<sup>2</sup> --> CO<sup>2</sup> + 2H<sup>2</sup>O
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    Forum Masters Degree invert_nexus's Avatar
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    Yeah. I'm no expert on this either.
    But, I think that the amount of water created through chemical processes is actually minimal. I believe that the vast majority of water on out planet was not formed on the planet but is rather left over from early solar system formatiion. The Oort cloud is full of icy bodies. And many of them are perturbed into orbits that bring them around the sun.

    Comets.

    The early earth was pummeled with these things and they delivered the water to our fair globe.


    However, there are an innumerable number of chemical reactions that put out water as a byproduct, but these are neglible in the grand scale of things.


    Sure yah can.
    You're welcome...

    CH<sup>4</sup>+2O<sup>2</sup> --> CO<sup>2</sup> + 2H<sup>2</sup>O
    You mean?

    CH<sub>4</sub>+2O<sub>2</sub> --> CO<sub>2</sub> + 2H<sub>2</sub>O

    Code:
    CH<sub>4</sub>+2O<sub>2</sub> --> CO<sub>2</sub> + 2H<sub>2</sub>O
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  7. #6  
    Pep
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    yeah but! what is the force that causes the reaction
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  8. #7  
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    Quote Originally Posted by invert_nexus
    But, I think that the amount of water created through chemical processes is actually minimal.
    You could very well be right about that, and I suspected that the answer would be given by a chemist, geologist, or astrophysicist. I'd like to make it clear that I am only offering my 2 cents. Prior to looking it up in my chem book, I thought water was created by Evian.

    I'll bow out now and read with interest.
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  9. #8  
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    Moved to Chemistry.
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  10. #9 Re: how is water created 
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pep
    Hi guys I am just a newbie to this forum. Ok I have got a question how is water created eg is it from the atmospheric preasure by forcing the hrydogen and oxgen together or is it created in volcanos or what.
    How queer! This seems to be the sort of obvious question nobody ever bothered to ask. Not sure I can answer it either (although originally trained as a chemist), but I do know one thing.

    All the free oxygen in our atmosphere originates from the activity of green plants (including phytoplankton) which of course require water to exist. So chemical reactions involving free oxygen cannot possibly have been the origin of water on Earth - chicken and egg, so to speak.
    There also are a number of bits of biochemistry which produce water in quite substantial molar amounts, but again, it's chicken and egg.

    As to the comet scenario, fine. But that really only pushes the problem into space, it don't solve it.

    Hmm. Nice one....
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  11. #10  
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    It would have to start with an understanding of the water cycle.

    But, where did all the water come from? Here's a link that explained a little bit. http://www.madsci.org/posts/archives...6464.Es.r.html
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    As I understand it if you mix hydrogen + oxygen then ignite them, then the hydrogen + oxygen fuse creating very small amounts of water. So on earth could it be that water is formed by bolts of lighting supplying the required energy to fuse them into water, and so water goes throught a life cycle from water to too separate partical state and back again
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    it is possible, but the amount of hydrcogen in earths atmosphere is minimal if any. if is not dense enough to stay in our gravitational field.

    however there is hydrogen constantly being created(separaetd form other compounds)on earth, so if there was a good enough heat source near this(eg comets colliding into earth while it was being created) then it would haev made some given enough oxygen was present
    and so the balance of power shifts...
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    Water is always created in a neutralization reaction, where an acid and a base result in salt water.

    NaOH + HCl ==> H<sub>2</sub>O + NaCl

    Normally once the water is created it stays that way unless hydrogen is displaced by another element.

    2 Na + 2 H<sub>2</sub>O ==> 2 NaOH + H<sub>2</sub>, but with the atmospheric oxygen and the massive heat produced...

    4 Na + 4 H<sub>2</sub>O + O<sub>2</sub> ==> 4 NaOH + 2 H<sub>2</sub>O.

    So no water is truly lost, the only way to get rid of water is by electrolysis.
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  15. #14  
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    hmm, that gives me an idea.

    electrolysis produces hydrogen and oxygen form the water, so what if we were to take warm water near the equator, convert it into rocket fuel, send a massive fridge to mars, where the heat created would aid a future colonisation. then use the firdge to cool massive metal rods to ridiculously low temperatures, then bring them back to earth and place them in the ocean, where they will cool it to a temperature where it refreezes the ice caps it melted.

    i figure that cooling the ocean, would have a much more direct effect on the global climate than cutting out greenhouse gases, which will not happen in the near future.

    i know this idea is crazy, and almost impossible, but if we were able to harvest the nitrogen on mars ot the same time, and bring it back here, we could convert it to nitrates and sell it to the agricultural industry in ordre to cover the insane costs
    and so the balance of power shifts...
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  16. #15 water evolves 
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    my god. is this a religious forum ?
    water is not created it evolves.
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  17. #16 Re: water evolves 
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    Quote Originally Posted by genep
    my god. Is this a religious forum?
    Water is not created it evolves.
    where'd that come from? Elements don't evolve loll they join

    To discover where water came from, you have to go back to the very beginning, before our life began. Because water was there. We are water based, so water was there first. Then life and stuff started the water cycle. (Im talking bout the one I have to learn for my chemistry exam)

    Hydrogen is the simplest, most important element in our humble lil planet. Not sure why.
    H<sub>2</sub>O is made up of H<sub>2</sub> and one O.
    But oxygen is always O<sub>2</sub>, two atoms.
    Hydrogen has one electron, and thus two electrons in the H<sub>2</sub>form.
    O, Has 16 electrons in the 2, 8, 6 and need's two electrons to satisfy it. It stays in the O<sub>2</sub> form. (Both H<sub>2</sub> and O<sub>2</sub> are covalent bonds with themselves.

    So they are present from the big bang. (Not sure what that’s all about.) And are floating around. And now the covalent bond in the h<sub>2</sub> and O<sub>2</sub> have electro negativity. Arising form the position of the lone pairs. H<sub>2</sub> has very little electro negativity, because the 2 electrons are the only two involved. While O<sub>2</sub> has two lone pairs. It’s more electronegative, so they are attracted in a + to - type thing. Although they are both neutral just slight charge. So they get closer. And they realise its easier to have a 2 and 2, 8, 6+2(from the h<sub>2</sub>) so the O<sub>2</sub> splits. And thus H<sub>2</sub>O is formed. And the lone O atom flying around finds an H<sub>2</sub> to join. And this happens easier because the O atom is not now satisfied.

    That’s how I understand it after thinking, and making it up. I’ll check it out. I told it in a half science story/ fact.
    Problem is I'm not sure how H and O came about, when they joined, so eh. It is just a possible reason. Also my understanding of electro negativity aient great. But I think it makes sense. Get a professor to check it?
    Might I suggest also that you read up on electro negativity, and why it occurs? I didn’t explain it well.
    last point. thats my understanding, and i may of heard it somewhere before, but i dunno. it makes a lil sense, as long as i am talking proper!
    Stumble on through life.
    Feel free to correct any false information, which unknown to me, may be included in my posts. (also - let this be a disclaimer)
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