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Thread: Can the alcohol destroy the property of vitamin C?

  1. #1 Can the alcohol destroy the property of vitamin C? 
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    If I put some kind of alcohol, can it destroy the property of vitamin C?


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  3. #2  
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    Well, I read somewhere that over 90% of alcoholics suffer from shortage of vitamin C. So I guess that alcohol and vitamin C don't fit together very well.


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    Forum Freshman Dantak's Avatar
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    Vitamin C is an antioxidant. But it only functions as an antioxidant in the presence of an oxidizing agent. You can see by it's structure that it is almost completely surrounded by hydroxyl groups (ie. alcohol).


    I think that vitamin C would be stable in alcohol for a very long time.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dantak
    Vitamin C is an antioxidant. But it only functions as an antioxidant in the presence of an oxidizing agent. You can see by it's structure that it is almost completely surrounded by hydroxyl groups (ie. alcohol).


    I think that vitamin C would be stable in alcohol for a very long time.
    So what that mean?
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    Forum Freshman Dantak's Avatar
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    Well, when your are determing whether or not things will react in organic chemistry, you look at the functional groups and guess as to what reactions could happen at those functional groups. In the case of Vitamin C the only functional groups are alcohols, getting those to react with another alcohol is not very likely.
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    I think it's more the case that C is more susceptible to reactions in an alcoholic solution as compared to water, so EtOH would not be the killer but rather an accomplice.
    Also it's possible that alcohol simply reduces absorption of C from the intestines. see http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/reprint/34/11/2394.pdf
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    Well, when your are determing whether or not things will react in organic chemistry, you look at the functional groups and guess as to what reactions could happen at those functional groups.
    This is a very simplistic approach. It is more important the strength of the bonds that may be implied in a given reaction and the electronic distribution in a given molecule. In other words, functional groups will behave differently depending on the molecule and the reaction.

    Best regards,

    César
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  9. #8 hi 
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    i think it would be very much stable inside alchohol.
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  10. #9 Chemistry lab vs Parachute oil!!! 
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    You reminded of my good old days too. In our house it was a ritual of women gathering and oiling and braiding each others hair, only we sweared by Dabur Amla. Like you I used to hate it at that time. I used to be envious of my friends who were allowed to have their hair loose and not like me all oiled and plaited with no one strand out of its place. But once married and setteled I use it regularly and have learned that there is no substitution. Of course getting my daughter to do it is impossible she just complains of the smell...how could I explain to her that the same smell makes me nostalgic.
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    Sujith





    Alcoholism Treatment
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  11. #10 Can the alcohol destroy the property of vitamin C? 
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    Other symptoms may be resolved as a side benefit of correcting another health problem. For example, many women find that their moods improve after taking B vitamins to reduce menstrual cramps.

    There are many benefits to rectifying relatively minor conditions, such as reducing the risk of more serious diseases down the line. For example, taking vitamin C for bleeding gums can prevent more serious infections that can lead to heart disease and stroke.
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    Luther Samuel

    http://www.alcoholisminformation.org
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  12. #11  
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    Well, that definitely wasn't an add bot...
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  13. #12 vitamuin C 
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    you will have a solution of vitamin C in alcohol, no big deal.
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  14. #13  
    Forum Masters Degree organic god's Avatar
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    you will have a solution of vitamin C in alcohol, no big deal.
    sounds like a screwdriver, only less lethal =)
    everything is mathematical.
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    Before you go to bed, drink at least a pint of water and some orange juice - vitamin C speeds up the metabolism of alcohol by the liver
    BBC/HEALTH

    so the answer is no, taking more vitamin C helps you. so we could determine alchol does not affect vitamin C
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  16. #15  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gods servant
    Before you go to bed, drink at least a pint of water and some orange juice - vitamin C speeds up the metabolism of alcohol by the liver
    BBC/HEALTH

    so the answer is no, taking more vitamin C helps you. so we could determine alchol does not affect vitamin C
    As most know, alcohol is not terribly unpleasant while you are drinking it. But the next day after it mixes with oxygen, you can get a nasty hangover.

    We do know that alcohol will pick up oxygen in the body forming carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide. A hangover often simulates effects of diabetes.

    I know from actually experimenting with taking in oxygen in the morning after drinking, that it can cause you to pass out, if continued. However while you are drinking, or first pass out, it can revive you. I do not claim to understand all these points. However I have noted them, and am interested in the why.

    I believe that is why you cannot drink within 24 hours of receiving certain anesthetics. There are remnants of the alcohol left in your blood. Giving you oxygen might not revive you.

    Alcohol probably rips oxygen from nitrogen in the body. As does propane or butane. Some kids today get high breathing in butane. It gives them a rush. And then perhaps a hangover.

    I believe it is the oxygen ripped from the nitrogen that causes the problem. The carbon monoxide is probably more destructive, then carbon dioxide.

    I have found that usually the single oxygen atom, is capable of powerful corrosive destruction. While the double oxygen atom of O2 is not as corrosive.

    These are not hardened medical facts. Just things I have personally noticed. Along with my beliefs.



    Sincerely,


    William McCormick
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  17. #16  
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    You are entitled to your beliefs, that's called politics or religion, this is science , please keep that in mind.
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  18. #17  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard i_feel_tiredsleepy's Avatar
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    Never listen to William, hangovers are caused by dehydration and the lower blood pH.

    The liver metabolises ethanol to acetaldehyde, which then is quickly converted to the non toxic acetic acid which lowers the blood pH. This with the dehydration causes the pain.

    This also requires heavy use of NAD+, so the body needs to produce more NAD+ quickly and uses pyruvate to do so, which results in a drop in blood sugar, which contributes the lethargy and weakness symptoms of hangover.

    Nausea is caused by direct damage to the epithelial cells of the stomach.

    Edit: Since alcohol acts as a diuretic Vitamin C is depleted in the urine.
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