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Thread: vacuum

  1. #1 vacuum 
    Moderator Moderator AlexP's Avatar
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    Something I just thought of... If we consider a normal jar with air inside of it, it's pretty easy to say that there is not a vacuum inside the jar. However, everywhere, in jars, in the atmosphere around us, in solid objects, etc., there is always a vacuum. Because, the originally mentioned jar is filled with air, but there is always empty space between the individual gas molecules. So, the inside of the jar as a whole is not a vacuum, but you can think of the space surrounding and in-between the gas molecules as a vacuum. And even in solids, there is vacuum, because there is truly empty space within atoms, because they're not solid. Sure there are electrons, but the electron shells are not totally solid, there is space within them, wherever the electrons aren't. So really, when you look at things at the atomic/subatomic level, everything is completely surrounded by an enormous vacuum, because the atoms of the originally mentioned jar contain empty space, and this empty space flows from the inside space of the jar between gas molecules, out to the space in the interior of the atoms that make up the jar, and out into the air around the jar. Comments...?


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  3. #2 Re: vacuum 
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chemboy
    Something I just thought of... If we consider a normal jar with air inside of it, it's pretty easy to say that there is not a vacuum inside the jar. However, everywhere, in jars, in the atmosphere around us, in solid objects, etc., there is always a vacuum. Because, the originally mentioned jar is filled with air, but there is always empty space between the individual gas molecules. So, the inside of the jar as a whole is not a vacuum, but you can think of the space surrounding and in-between the gas molecules as a vacuum. And even in solids, there is vacuum, because there is truly empty space within atoms, because they're not solid. Sure there are electrons, but the electron shells are not totally solid, there is space within them, wherever the electrons aren't. So really, when you look at things at the atomic/subatomic level, everything is completely surrounded by an enormous vacuum, because the atoms of the originally mentioned jar contain empty space, and this empty space flows from the inside space of the jar between gas molecules, out to the space in the interior of the atoms that make up the jar, and out into the air around the jar. Comments...?
    I would agree for everything excepting in the case of a solid metal: in that case the electron's wavefunctions fill the entire space inside the metal. You can't say that, however, there is void between two electrons, because electrons are not point particles there.


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  4. #3  
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    When we speak of "vacuum" we are always referring to a macroscopic volume, such as the contents of the jar you first mentioned. Get down to interatomic spaces and the term "vacuum" loses it meaning.
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  5. #4  
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    The apparent anomaly you have identified is wholly contingent on the definition of vacuum. Science (and more especially pseudfo-science) is full of examples like this. Nevertheless, it can be useful to help our understanding of phenomena to follow the consequences of a particular definition.
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  6. #5  
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    Yeah, it's true. Because I discovered it 6 years before. see my thread.
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  7. #6  
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveF View Post
    When we speak of "vacuum" we are always referring to a macroscopic volume, such as the contents of the jar you first mentioned. Get down to interatomic spaces and the term "vacuum" loses it meaning.
    Yes, indeed. Conceptual problems often become simple when we pay attention to meaning of words.
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