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Thread: "K" for equilibrium rxns

  1. #1 "K" for equilibrium rxns 
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    What does k (equilib constant) for an equilibrium reaction represent--for example, ka, kp, kc, ksp...?


    Whence comes this logic: no evidence = false?

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    Forum Freshman Keith's Avatar
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    I think it tells you where the equilibrium lies or occurs. How much reactants/products there are or how much a salt dissociates etc. As for units or whatever idk which is bad cause I had the AP chem test today.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Keith
    I think it tells you where the equilibrium lies or occurs. How much reactants/products there are or how much a salt dissociates etc. As for units or whatever idk which is bad cause I had the AP chem test today.
    Yea...I had it too. I think MC wasn't that easy (but it wasn't that hard either); and Free Response was real easy.
    Whence comes this logic: no evidence = false?

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    Quote Originally Posted by scientstphilosophertheist
    Quote Originally Posted by Keith
    I think it tells you where the equilibrium lies or occurs. How much reactants/products there are or how much a salt dissociates etc. As for units or whatever idk which is bad cause I had the AP chem test today.
    Yea...I had it too. I think MC wasn't that easy (but it wasn't that hard either); and Free Response was real easy.
    I had it too. I thought the MC was ok. You thought the Free Response was really easy? Good thing you did. Of course, I think not taking the course really hurt me... Oh well.
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    Forum Freshman Keith's Avatar
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    Well, I thought the MC was easier than the free response. I never learned any kind of cell stuff, so that kind of hurt. My teacher was absent and we didn't learn anything for 6 weeks, so we didnt get through everything.

    Funny thing happened though.
    Usually, my school takes the AP exams at the department office, in a different town, except for this exam we had to take it in a different building because the Environment AP was where we usually are. The chem bus went to the wrong place, and we didnt know, so we all got off, and the bus left. So now everyone is in the parlking lot of some youth center in a town we've never been in. The majority of us thought that it was the greatest thing that could happen, however a select few went in search of the testing center. Eventually someone called the school and we ended up walking to the testing center, but we almost missed being able to take the test cause there is only that 1 hour time frame to start it during.
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    what i understand is that K (not k) for a reaction (in equilibrium) is always constant for a particular temperature. It tells you about how the reaction shifts and in which direction when we increase the conc. or pressure, or temperature etc. ( Le'Chatelier's principle)
    Also, if we know the rxn quotient (Q) for the reaction, we get to know in which direction it has progressed (towards reactants or towards products)
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