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Thread: Ferrous oxides.

  1. #1 Ferrous oxides. 
    Your Mama! GiantEvil's Avatar
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    Can kinetic energy (hammer, explosives, etc) cause any oxygen to disassociate from any particular ferrous oxide?


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    Bullshit Intolerant PhDemon's Avatar
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    No, the bonding between iron and oxygen is too strong...


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    10-4. Thanks.
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    Bullshit Intolerant PhDemon's Avatar
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    The only way to do it is to mix it with something that bonds even more strongly to oxygen and set off the reaction. The thermite reaction (using aluminium powder) is a good example.
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    So, I guess my next question is; What typifies a bond that tends to break under physical shock?
    Is it as simple as bond length and type(ionic/covalent)?
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  7. #6  
    Bullshit Intolerant PhDemon's Avatar
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    They tend to be covalent compounds and the decomposition/detonation needs a reasonably low activation energy, these reactions are of two main types:

    Those chemicals with with long/weak bonds, that produce products with stronger bonds. A good example is the N-Cl and N-I bonds in the nitrogen trihalides (enthalpy driven).


    Others contain groups of atoms that can produce a lot of gas (entropy driven) if the bonds are broken (like the nitro group in TNT etc)
    Last edited by PhDemon; September 20th, 2022 at 01:35 PM. Reason: Typo
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