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Thread: Aluminum-Sodium eutectic mixture

  1. #1 Aluminum-Sodium eutectic mixture 
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    Is Aluminum capable to form any eutectic atomic mixtures with any metals like Na, K, Rb, Ca? Does it react with them anyhow? If yes, is this reaction exothermic? What kind of substance will we obtain if we will try to mix them?


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  3. #2  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stanley514 View Post
    Is Aluminum capable to form any eutectic atomic mixtures with any metals like Na, K, Rb, Ca? Does it react with them anyhow? If yes, is this reaction exothermic? What kind of substance will we obtain if we will try to mix them?
    I do not know, but any such material will be highly reactive in the presence of either oxygen or moisture.


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    Quote Originally Posted by exchemist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Stanley514 View Post
    Is Aluminum capable to form any eutectic atomic mixtures with any metals like Na, K, Rb, Ca? Does it react with them anyhow? If yes, is this reaction exothermic? What kind of substance will we obtain if we will try to mix them?
    I do not know, but any such material will be highly reactive in the presence of either oxygen or moisture.
    Let say we store an alkali metal in adsorbent to minimize contact with water and air and reaction with aluminum happens in a sealed container.
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    KJW
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    I think it is unlikely that sodium and aluminium will react with each other on their own. But they might react in the presence of a cryptand.
    There are no paradoxes in relativity, just people's misunderstandings of it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by KJW View Post
    I think it is unlikely that sodium and aluminium will react with each other on their own. But they might react in the presence of a cryptand.
    Thanks for this: a term I did not know. I looked it up and was pleased to see that Donald Cram won a Nobel in 1987 for these.

    I used Hendrikson, Cram and Hammond as one of my three organic chemistry textbooks at university in the 1970s, the others being Finar - deadly dull but de rigeur to have it - and R O C Norman's "Principles of Organic Synthesis", which provided a fabulous vocabulary of methods for solving undergrad level organic synthesis puzzles. I used to love those.

    But I digress......an old man's reminiscences.....
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    Quote Originally Posted by KJW View Post
    I think it is unlikely that sodium and aluminium will react with each other on their own. But they might react in the presence of a cryptand.
    So, what compound will form as a result of this reaction? With which chemical and physical properties?
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  8. #7  
    KJW
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stanley514 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by KJW View Post
    I think it is unlikely that sodium and aluminium will react with each other on their own. But they might react in the presence of a cryptand.
    So, what compound will form as a result of this reaction? With which chemical and physical properties?
    I only said they might react. I don't know if they do react, and even if they do react, I can only guess the product. However, I guess that if they do react, the product formed would be a salt formed with Na+ cryptate as the cation and some form of negatively charged aluminium species as the anion. Did you read the linked article about cryptands? Although there was no mention of aluminium, there was mention of alkalides and Zintl ions.

    The point is that a cryptand can encapsulate and stabilise a Na+ cation to such an extent as to allow the formation of anionic species that one wouldn't normally expect to exist. Such anionic species would be expected to be very powerful reducing agents.
    There are no paradoxes in relativity, just people's misunderstandings of it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by KJW View Post
    The point is that a cryptand can encapsulate and stabilise a Na+ cation to such an extent as to allow the formation of anionic species that one wouldn't normally expect to exist. Such anionic species would be expected to be very powerful reducing agents.
    The ability of cryptands to enhance the reducing power of alkali metals is analogous to the ability of antimony pentafluoride to enhance the oxidising power of fluorine.
    There are no paradoxes in relativity, just people's misunderstandings of it.
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