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Thread: Acidic Attractant?

  1. #1 Acidic Attractant? 
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    Does anybody know of any substances that have the ability to actually attract acids? I'm working on a project and making good progress, but I need some help on this part.


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  3. #2  
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    Quote Originally Posted by jwscienceman View Post
    Does anybody know of any substances that have the ability to actually attract acids? I'm working on a project and making good progress, but I need some help on this part.
    This question needs tighter definition before it can be answered. Do you mean any particular types of acid or acids in general? Are they in solution? If so, would they be dissociated? If they are dissociated, are you interested in attracting the H+ ions or the anions?


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    Yes, a semipermeable membrane, of which you charge one side with a positive and one side with a negative charge. The membrane should only either support a positive or a negative ion to pass with a certain energy, and add any anion or kation to the side you want.

    Say you want to form nitric acid. Use a nitrate salt, for this, Like calcium nitrate. Next to it add any other salt. Charge the side with the calcium nitrate negatively, so it will attract protons. Slowly you will see protons heaping up on this side. And with enough power you will form solid calcium on as sediment, and you will have created nitric acid. Getting your hands on a good membrane is crucial though.

    There are plenty other ways, but i thought i'd give you an original one
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    Sorry I didn't specify, I meant substances that are acidic, pH-wise.
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    Sorry I didn't specify, I meant substances that are acidic, pH-wise.
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  7. #6  
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    Quote Originally Posted by jwscienceman View Post
    Sorry I didn't specify, I meant substances that are acidic, pH-wise.
    That just means acids.

    I asked you some questions to indicate the sort of further detail I was after and you come back with this. I'm beginning to wonder if you are serious.
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  8. #7  
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    Quote Originally Posted by exchemist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by jwscienceman View Post
    Sorry I didn't specify, I meant substances that are acidic, pH-wise.
    That just means acids.

    I asked you some questions to indicate the sort of further detail I was after and you come back with this. I'm beginning to wonder if you are serious.
    The specific substance I'm discussing is carbon dioxide. By nature, carbon dioxide is just slightly acidic, but I never really thought of it as an acid.
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  9. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by jwscienceman View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by exchemist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by jwscienceman View Post
    Sorry I didn't specify, I meant substances that are acidic, pH-wise.
    That just means acids.

    I asked you some questions to indicate the sort of further detail I was after and you come back with this. I'm beginning to wonder if you are serious.
    The specific substance I'm discussing is carbon dioxide. By nature, carbon dioxide is just slightly acidic, but I never really thought of it as an acid.
    When CO2 dissolves in water, about 0.2% of it is converted to carbonic acid H2CO3. This is the proportion that is converted to the acid form in a solution of the gas in water at equilibrium. The relationship between the amount of dissolved CO2, the amount converted to carbonic acid, and the resulting acidity due to the acid is fairly complex. There is more about it here: Carbonic acid - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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    So is carbon dioxide in and of itslef acidic?
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  11. #10  
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    Quote Originally Posted by jwscienceman View Post
    So is carbon dioxide in and of itslef acidic?
    No.

    It has no hydrogen, so cannot release H+, which is what gives acids a pH <7.
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  12. #11  
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    Quote Originally Posted by jwscienceman View Post
    So is carbon dioxide in and of itslef acidic?
    I think CO2 would qualify as a weak Lewis acid and a weak electrophile. It reacts with bases. For example, its reaction with amines to form carbamates may actually be what you are seeking.
    Last edited by KJW; October 4th, 2014 at 10:21 AM.
    There are no paradoxes in relativity, just people's misunderstandings of it.
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  13. #12  
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    Quote Originally Posted by KJW View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by jwscienceman View Post
    So is carbon dioxide in and of itslef acidic?
    I think CO2 would qualify as a weak Lewis acid and a weak electrophile. It reacts with bases. For example, its reaction with amines to form carbamates may actually be what you are seeking.
    Good points.
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